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NEWS
October 24, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a hastily arranged secret ceremony, Clarence Thomas was sworn in Wednesday as the nation's 106th Supreme Court justice, providing a fitting end to a consistently surprising confirmation process. Thomas had been scheduled to take his judicial oath of office in a traditional Supreme Court ceremony Nov. 1. Since the court is in recess this week and next, the justices will not conduct any official business or hear arguments until Nov. 4.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - A federal court ordered law enforcement officials Thursday to respond to an accusation by state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon that they leaked a confidential FBI affidavit alleging that he took bribes. A clerk for U.S. District Judge Troy L. Nunley in Sacramento sent federal authorities and Calderon an order to provide a "joint status report" on the leak allegations and on whether they can be resolved through mediation or settlement talks. A sealed FBI affidavit, published recently by a cable television network, accuses Calderon (D-Montebello)
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Bad news for American writers hoping for a Nobel Prize next week: The top member of the award jury believes the United States is too insular and ignorant to compete with Europe when it comes to great writing. As the Swedish Academy enters final deliberations for this year's award, permanent secretary Horace Engdahl said it's no coincidence that most winners are European. "Of course there is powerful literature in all big cultures, but you can't get away from the fact that Europe still is the center of the literary world . . . not the United States," he said in an interview Tuesday.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2012 | Times wire services
NEW YORK — A federal judge has approved a U.S. government settlement with three major publishers accused of conspiring with Apple to fix the prices of electronic books. The ruling released Thursday requires the publishers, Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster, to abandon a pricing system that they conceived in 2010 when Apple Inc. released the iPad and began selling digital books in its iTunes store. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote approved the deal nearly five months after the Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit alleging Apple worked with the largest digital book publishers to rig a system designed to counteract Amazon.com's pricing practices.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2012 | Times wire services
NEW YORK — A federal judge has approved a U.S. government settlement with three major publishers accused of conspiring with Apple to fix the prices of electronic books. The ruling released Thursday requires the publishers, Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster, to abandon a pricing system that they conceived in 2010 when Apple Inc. released the iPad and began selling digital books in its iTunes store. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote approved the deal nearly five months after the Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit alleging Apple worked with the largest digital book publishers to rig a system designed to counteract Amazon.com's pricing practices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2010
On a recent morning, Mexican criminal-court judge Reynaldo Madruga Picazzo sat in the back of a downtown Los Angeles courtroom and watched as a police officer testified in the case of an accused gang member and a gun. Over the years, the 72-year-old had presided over many murder and kidnapping trials in his country. Always, he was judge and jury. No one ever took the stand in his courtroom. Picazzo pored over reams of paper trails, outlining accusations and defenses, and dispensed justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A judge ordered a federal agency Tuesday to rewrite protections for migrating salmon that have reduced water shipments from Northern California, concluding that some of the pumping curbs were based on "equivocal or bad science. " But in a mixed ruling, U.S. District Judge Oliver Wanger also said that the National Marine Fisheries Service was justified in finding that government water operations that export supplies from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta jeopardize dwindling populations of chinook salmon and several other fish on the endangered species list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - A federal court ordered law enforcement officials Thursday to respond to an accusation by state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon that they leaked a confidential FBI affidavit alleging that he took bribes. A clerk for U.S. District Judge Troy L. Nunley in Sacramento sent federal authorities and Calderon an order to provide a "joint status report" on the leak allegations and on whether they can be resolved through mediation or settlement talks. A sealed FBI affidavit, published recently by a cable television network, accuses Calderon (D-Montebello)
WORLD
February 5, 2009 | Henry Chu
Two of Britain's most senior judges accused the United States on Wednesday of having threatened to withhold intelligence from the British government if it released information about the alleged torture of a terrorism suspect currently being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Binyam Mohammed, an Ethiopian resident of Britain, has alleged that he was tortured during interrogations by American, British and Pakistani security agents after being detained in Pakistan in 2002.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | Associated Press
Calling the murder and dismemberment of a Maryland teenager "an act of desecration," an Israeli judge Sunday ended a lengthy and painful episode in Israeli-U.S. relations by sentencing Samuel Sheinbein to 24 years in prison. Sheinbein, 19, hands behind his back, did not react as the verdict was read two years after he fled to Israel and successfully sought refuge from extradition, enraging Maryland authorities and briefly threatening U.S. aid to the Jewish state.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Apple Inc., which has been embroiled in a bitter patent fight with Samsung Electronics Co., won a court order Tuesday blocking the sale of Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer in the U.S. The preliminary injunction will be in effect while the two technology giants litigate Apple's patent infringement claims. "Although Samsung will necessarily be harmed by being forced to withdraw its product from the market before the merits can be determined after a full trial, the harm faced by Apple absent an injunction on the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is greater," U.S. District Judge Lucy H. Koh in San Jose said in the eight-page ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Judge Pamela Ann Rymer, who filled the seat vacated by Judge Anthony Kennedy on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1989 after he was named to the U.S. Supreme Court and who was highly respected for her sharp legal mind, productivity and dedication, has died. She was 70. Rymer, who was diagnosed with cancer in 2009, died Wednesday in a Los Angeles hospital, said a court spokesman. Rymer, whose chambers were in Pasadena, continued to work throughout her illness and was preparing for cases to be heard in October until two days before she died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
A judge ordered a federal agency Tuesday to rewrite protections for migrating salmon that have reduced water shipments from Northern California, concluding that some of the pumping curbs were based on "equivocal or bad science. " But in a mixed ruling, U.S. District Judge Oliver Wanger also said that the National Marine Fisheries Service was justified in finding that government water operations that export supplies from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta jeopardize dwindling populations of chinook salmon and several other fish on the endangered species list.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Federal court officials declared a judicial emergency Tuesday in Arizona, allowing courts to delay criminal trials up to six months because of a shortage of judges worsened by the shooting death two weeks ago in Tucson of the state's chief jurist. Arizona federal courts were already overwhelmed by a 65% increase in criminal cases in the last two years and two judicial vacancies when U.S. District Judge John M. Roll was killed in the Jan. 8 attack that also severely wounded Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan and Noam N. Levey,
A U.S. district judge on Monday blocked the federal government from funding all research involving human embryonic stem cells on the grounds that it violates a 1996 law intended to prevent the destruction of of human embryos. The ruling came in the form of a preliminary injunction in a case involving two scientists who challenged the Obama administration's stem cell funding policy, which was designed to expand federal support for the controversial research. Embryonic stem cell researchers said the decision would throw the field into turmoil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2010
On a recent morning, Mexican criminal-court judge Reynaldo Madruga Picazzo sat in the back of a downtown Los Angeles courtroom and watched as a police officer testified in the case of an accused gang member and a gun. Over the years, the 72-year-old had presided over many murder and kidnapping trials in his country. Always, he was judge and jury. No one ever took the stand in his courtroom. Picazzo pored over reams of paper trails, outlining accusations and defenses, and dispensed justice.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Federal appeals courts in the West face a staggering increase in their caseloads over the next five years, prompting calls from some of the region's top judges for specialized panels to hear complex cases and for a new system of appellate magistrates. The proposals for managing an expected 50% increase in the workload of the U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Francis C. Whelan, a senior U.S. District Court judge and former U.S. attorney for Southern California, has died at age 83. His death on Thursday at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Palm Desert was announced late Friday by Chief Judge Manuel L. Real of the U.S. Central District Court, based in Los Angeles. Whelan, whose judicial philosophy was simply "a case is a case, and you decide it the way you think it should be," had officially retired from the court in 1978.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2009 | Richard Fausset
In a ruling that could leave the government open to billions of dollars in claims from Hurricane Katrina victims, a federal judge said late Wednesday that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had displayed "gross negligence" in failing to maintain a navigation channel -- resulting in levee breaches that flooded large swaths of greater New Orleans. U.S. District Judge Stanwood R. Duval peppered his 156-page decision, issued in New Orleans, with harsh criticism of the Army corps, at one point citing its "insouciance, myopia and shortsightedness" in failing to maintain the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, known locally as MRGO.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
A federal judge has rejected key provisions of a plan for managing millions of acres in the California desert, saying the U.S. Bureau of Land Management designated roughly 5,000 miles of off-road vehicle routes without properly taking into account their impact on public lands, archaeological sites and wildlife. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston on Monday ruled that the West Mojave plan, which the bureau approved in 2006 after a decade of development, is "flawed because it does not contain a reasonable range of alternatives" to limit the number of miles of off-road routes.
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