Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges United States
IN THE NEWS

Judges United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of the narrow sandy road that winds to the marshy shore of Moon River lies the life into which Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas was born--and the life that his sister never left. Emma Mae Martin still lives in a dilapidated frame house with a hole in the roof just a few steps from the spot where a midwife delivered her and her two younger brothers. Nearby stands the rotting factory where she had once picked crabs, as her mother had done before her.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in New York said Thursday that he was on the verge of declaring the federal death penalty law unconstitutional because too many condemned inmates have turned out to be innocent. U.S. District Judge Jed S. Rakoff issued the tentative order in a pending narcotics and murder case in which two men face a possible death sentence. If he makes the order final, the two defendants would still face murder charges but could not be executed if convicted.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the throes of a civil war that left his wife, baby son and brother dead and made him the target of Muslim rebels, Moses Cirrilo fled Sudan for a free life in America. He thought that once the authorities heard his story, they would greet him with open arms and grant him political asylum. He never expected he would spend the next three years in jail, sometimes handcuffed and shackled, he said, "like a criminal."
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court justices do not spend all their time indoors squinting over legal briefs, or so they are quick to report. Take Justice Antonin Scalia, the combative conservative, for instance. When he's not firing verbal shots at his colleagues over what he views as flawed reasoning, he likes to take aim at deer, ducks and turkeys. In a May interview with GQ magazine, the former University of Chicago law professor said his favorite magazine is "Ducks Unlimited."
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar was sentenced Thursday to six months in prison for obstruction of justice for lying to FBI agents and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped. U.S. District Judge Louis Bechtle of Philadelphia imposed far less prison time than prosecutors had sought. But he told Aguilar that an obstruction of justice conviction "by a judge, no less, is a chilling message indeed."
NEWS
June 18, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Chief Justice Warren Burger told President Reagan in 1986 that he planned to retire from the Supreme Court, he handed Reagan's aides exactly the opening they had hoped for. Reagan's agenda on abortion, school prayer and affirmative action was blocked in Congress, and Burger's resignation gave the White House a chance to break what they saw as the liberals' lock on constitutional law.
NEWS
June 27, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The U.S. Senate on Friday confirmed Century City lawyer A. Howard Matz to a federal district judgeship in Los Angeles. "I'm very honored, and I'm truly looking forward to serving," said Matz, 54, a partner at Bird, Marella, Boxer, Wolpert & Matz. "It's a wonderful opportunity to participate in the process of pursuing justice." Matz was nominated for the position by President Clinton last October on the recommendation of Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial federal judge surprised a Senate committee Tuesday by asserting that young blacks who were attacked by police dogs may have benefited from the experience. Judge Kenneth L. Ryskamp, President Bush's nominee to move up to a federal appeals court, said the mauling of several young black men by police attack dogs may have provided "a negative reinforcement" against their committing future crimes.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | from Associated Press
The judge who tried the white supremacists charged in the slaying of radio talk show host Alan Berg was appointed Monday to handle the Oklahoma City bombing case, replacing a judge whose chambers were damaged in the blast. U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch, a 65-year-old ex-prosecutor appointed to the Denver bench by then-President Richard Nixon, was assigned the case by the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. The appellate court Friday ordered U.S.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | Marlene Cimons
Moderate Republican U.S. appeals court judge Amalya L. Kearse, 54, a black woman and moderate Republican, was appointed to the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City in 1979 by President Jimmy Carter. She was the first woman and second black to join that court. (The first was Thurgood Marshall.) Kearse's name has come up before as a possible Supreme Court appointee.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the throes of a civil war that left his wife, baby son and brother dead and made him the target of Muslim rebels, Moses Cirrilo fled Sudan for a free life in America. He thought that once the authorities heard his story, they would greet him with open arms and grant him political asylum. He never expected he would spend the next three years in jail, sometimes handcuffed and shackled, he said, "like a criminal."
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From the Washington Post
President Bush decided Thursday to discontinue a half-century tradition in which presidents have relied on the American Bar Assn. for advice on potential candidates for federal judgeships, concluding that it is unfair to give "any single group such a preferential, quasi-official role." Bush's chief counsel, Alberto R. Gonzales, told the head of the nation's main organization of lawyers that the administration would not give the names of people under consideration for the U.S.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Americans should not get into a "major food fight" over issues such as affirmative action but should be thoughtful, as the Constitution's framers were, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said. "Now it's a war of words, it's a war of politics, and I don't see where it does any good," he said in a speech at James Madison University in Harrisonburg.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. Supreme Court opens the second half of its term today, its conservative majority has the opportunity to push the law to the right on several fronts before the incoming George W. Bush administration has a chance to pursue a legal agenda. The justices are expected to rule soon on cases concerning civil rights, employment and the environment--issues that have divided the court's conservative and liberal blocs.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President Clinton, complaining that Republicans have stymied his attempts to diversify the federal bench, bypassed the Senate on Wednesday to appoint the first black judge to the all-white U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va. The temporary appointment of Richmond lawyer Roger Gregory lasts a year, but Clinton said he will also formally nominate Gregory to the seat a second time in January, when the new Congress convenes.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two major presidential candidates are giving the voters a sharp, clear choice on the future of the Supreme Court. Texas Gov. George W. Bush says he would choose new justices in the mold of Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas. The court's two most conservative justices, they want to repeal a woman's right to abortion. For his part, Vice President Al Gore says he would impose a litmus test and choose only justices who support abortion rights.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Byron R. White, the lone Democrat on the Supreme Court, announced Friday that he will retire in June, clearing the way for the first time in a quarter-century for a Democratic President to select a new appointee to the high court. White's retirement was not unexpected, although many observers had thought that the court's oldest justice, Harry A. Blackmun, would depart first. White, 75, a terse, no-nonsense jurist, announced his decision in a typically brief written statement.
NEWS
August 19, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal appeals court judge who is a Democratic appointee apologized Friday for what he said was his inadvertent disclosure that a new grand jury had been impaneled to investigate President Clinton. The jurist, Richard D. Cudahy of Chicago, said he mentioned the existence of the new panel Thursday when responding to a media inquiry about why he had voted that the investigation of Whitewater independent counsel Robert W. Ray could continue for another year.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after House members raised charges of racism because of the Senate's foot-dragging on judicial nominees, senators approved Friday the first black female judge for the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. U.S. District Judge Johnnie B. Rawlinson, 48, of Las Vegas, was elevated to the appellate court on a voice vote. The circuit covers California, Arizona, Nevada, Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|