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Judges United States

NEWS
June 29, 1991 | Marlene Cimons
Moderate Republican U.S. appeals court judge Ferdinand F. Fernandez, 54, a member of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Los Angeles, was named to the appellate bench in 1989 by President Bush. At the time of his appointment, he was serving as a federal district court judge. Fernandez was first nominated for the appeals court in 1988 by former President Ronald Reagan, but Congress failed to act on the appointment before Reagan left office. Bush then resubmitted the nomination.
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NEWS
April 4, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All living things must either adapt to the snow and cold that drape the nation's oldest national park in a vast white blanket each winter, or leave. Elk migrate to lowlands. Grizzly bears hibernate. And U.S. Magistrate Steven Cole retreats to his wood-paneled lair to catch up on months' worth of paperwork while the sounds of Eric Clapton issue from a boombox next to a frost-coated window.
NEWS
June 25, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government Monday dropped its 7-year-old criminal prosecution of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar--the first federal judge ever indicted in California--in exchange for Aguilar's immediate resignation from the bench. In January, a federal appeals court paved the way for the agreement by overturning Aguilar's sole remaining conviction, on charges of disclosing wiretap information. The U.S. Justice Department had until Monday to decide whether to appeal to the Supreme Court.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 21-year-old Salvadoran stood before U.S. Immigration Judge Thomas Fong in a nearly empty chamber of the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles. The question before the judge: Was the young man a political refugee who deserved asylum in the United States, or was he a draft dodger who ought to be returned to El Salvador? Picked up by immigration agents as an illegal alien, the young man told the judge that he had come to the United States to escape political turmoil and threats on his life.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Federal agents reportedly examined items that were confiscated from a suspect in a probe of mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a Savannah, Ga., attorney in December. The FBI began searching a house, a storage shed and three vehicles belonging to Walter Leroy Moody of Rex, Ga. Moody became a target in the inquiry after federal agents noted similarities between a bomb that injured his former wife in 1972 and the ones used in the fatal bombings.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | By RICHARD SIMON,
After enduring a record 1,506-day wait, U.S. District Judge Richard A. Paez of Los Angeles won Senate confirmation Thursday to the federal appeals court. The surprisingly lopsided 59-to-39 vote ended a bitter partisan fight over the long-stalled nomination--one capped by Vice President Al Gore suspending his presidential campaign to stand by in the Capitol to cast a tie-breaking vote, if needed. But Gore's vote was not needed.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Americans should not get into a "major food fight" over issues such as affirmative action but should be thoughtful, as the Constitution's framers were, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said. "Now it's a war of words, it's a war of politics, and I don't see where it does any good," he said in a speech at James Madison University in Harrisonburg.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the U.S. Supreme Court opens the second half of its term today, its conservative majority has the opportunity to push the law to the right on several fronts before the incoming George W. Bush administration has a chance to pursue a legal agenda. The justices are expected to rule soon on cases concerning civil rights, employment and the environment--issues that have divided the court's conservative and liberal blocs.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
The judge who will decide the Microsoft antitrust case acknowledged Wednesday in surprisingly candid remarks that the pending $4-billion purchase of Netscape Communications by America Online "might be a very significant change of the playing field." On the last day of the trial before a holiday recess, U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | From The Washington Post
Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas faced down some of his harshest critics Wednesday, telling the nation's largest organization of black lawyers that he will not succumb to pressure to alter his conservative legal views even if it means being branded a traitor to his race. In a simultaneously plaintive and defiant address before the National Bar Assn.
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