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Judges United States

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June 29, 1991 | Marlene Cimons
Moderate Republican U.S. appeals court judge Amalya L. Kearse, 54, a black woman and moderate Republican, was appointed to the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City in 1979 by President Jimmy Carter. She was the first woman and second black to join that court. (The first was Thurgood Marshall.) Kearse's name has come up before as a possible Supreme Court appointee.
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NEWS
March 20, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justice Byron R. White, the lone Democrat on the Supreme Court, announced Friday that he will retire in June, clearing the way for the first time in a quarter-century for a Democratic President to select a new appointee to the high court. White's retirement was not unexpected, although many observers had thought that the court's oldest justice, Harry A. Blackmun, would depart first. White, 75, a terse, no-nonsense jurist, announced his decision in a typically brief written statement.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All living things must either adapt to the snow and cold that drape the nation's oldest national park in a vast white blanket each winter, or leave. Elk migrate to lowlands. Grizzly bears hibernate. And U.S. Magistrate Steven Cole retreats to his wood-paneled lair to catch up on months' worth of paperwork while the sounds of Eric Clapton issue from a boombox next to a frost-coated window.
NEWS
June 25, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government Monday dropped its 7-year-old criminal prosecution of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar--the first federal judge ever indicted in California--in exchange for Aguilar's immediate resignation from the bench. In January, a federal appeals court paved the way for the agreement by overturning Aguilar's sole remaining conviction, on charges of disclosing wiretap information. The U.S. Justice Department had until Monday to decide whether to appeal to the Supreme Court.
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 21-year-old Salvadoran stood before U.S. Immigration Judge Thomas Fong in a nearly empty chamber of the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles. The question before the judge: Was the young man a political refugee who deserved asylum in the United States, or was he a draft dodger who ought to be returned to El Salvador? Picked up by immigration agents as an illegal alien, the young man told the judge that he had come to the United States to escape political turmoil and threats on his life.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Federal agents reportedly examined items that were confiscated from a suspect in a probe of mail bombings that killed a federal judge and a Savannah, Ga., attorney in December. The FBI began searching a house, a storage shed and three vehicles belonging to Walter Leroy Moody of Rex, Ga. Moody became a target in the inquiry after federal agents noted similarities between a bomb that injured his former wife in 1972 and the ones used in the fatal bombings.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE
No one has ever accused Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist of being a stylish dresser. In his early years on the court, the tall and gawky Rehnquist sported loud ties and mismatched suits. While the other justices walked the halls in gray suits and black leather shoes, he wore khakis and Hush Puppies. Four years ago, he decided the plain black robe would not suffice.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | By RICHARD SIMON,
After enduring a record 1,506-day wait, U.S. District Judge Richard A. Paez of Los Angeles won Senate confirmation Thursday to the federal appeals court. The surprisingly lopsided 59-to-39 vote ended a bitter partisan fight over the long-stalled nomination--one capped by Vice President Al Gore suspending his presidential campaign to stand by in the Capitol to cast a tie-breaking vote, if needed. But Gore's vote was not needed.
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