Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudges Utah
IN THE NEWS

Judges Utah

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's nominations for 36 federal judgeships have stalled this year because of a five-month dispute between a key Senate Republican and the White House over a vacant judgeship in Utah. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, the Utah Republican who chairs the committee that oversees the federal judiciary, is demanding that the president nominate a conservative aide to Republican Gov. Mike Leavitt as a federal judge in Salt Lake City.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
May 11, 2011
SALT LAKE CITY — A federal judge on Tuesday blocked a new immigration law in Utah that would have allowed police to check the citizenship status of anyone they arrest. Judge Clark Waddoups issued his ruling in Salt Lake City hours after the law went into effect, citing its similarity to an Arizona law now before federal courts. The American Civil Liberties Union and National Immigration Law Center had sued to stop the law, warning that its implementation could lead to racial profiling.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has struck down a package of Utah laws designed to keep nuclear waste out of the state, saying it is a federal issue beyond the reach of state lawmakers. U.S. District Judge Tena Campbell said state officials have unfairly hindered nuclear utilities that are seeking a federal permit to store used nuclear fuel on the Skull Valley Goshute Indian Reservation.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge has struck down a package of Utah laws designed to keep nuclear waste out of the state, saying it is a federal issue beyond the reach of state lawmakers. U.S. District Judge Tena Campbell said state officials have unfairly hindered nuclear utilities that are seeking a federal permit to store used nuclear fuel on the Skull Valley Goshute Indian Reservation.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2011
SALT LAKE CITY — A federal judge on Tuesday blocked a new immigration law in Utah that would have allowed police to check the citizenship status of anyone they arrest. Judge Clark Waddoups issued his ruling in Salt Lake City hours after the law went into effect, citing its similarity to an Arizona law now before federal courts. The American Civil Liberties Union and National Immigration Law Center had sued to stop the law, warning that its implementation could lead to racial profiling.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
A three-judge federal panel on Tuesday dismissed Utah's complaint that it lost a congressional seat because the Census Bureau did not count Utah residents who are Mormon missionaries overseas. The judges in a unanimous ruling said the missionaries represent only a fraction of Americans living overseas and that counting them would give Utah a huge advantage over other states.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
A federal judge said Wednesday it would be "wildly" unfair to count Utah's Mormon missionaries overseas in the 2000 census because other Americans abroad cannot be counted so easily. "Including only missionaries would not advance the cause of equal representation," said Stephen Anderson, a U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals judge.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A federal judge in San Antonio overturned the Texas ban on same-sex marriage, ruling that the prohibition is unconstitutional and stigmatizes the relationship of gay couples in the conservative state. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia does not allow same-sex couples to immediately marry because he stayed the injunction pending any appeal. Garcia ruled that the state's ban deprives same-sex couples of due process and equal protection, stigmatizing their relationships and treating them differently from opposite-sex couples.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Michigan's ban on same-sex marriage treats gays as second-class citizens and should be overturned, an attorney representing a lesbian couple argued Tuesday at the start of the latest legal challenge to such laws. The case is being closely watched for more than its central argument that a state can ban same-sex marriage if its voters chose to pass such a constitutional amendment. The case also will focus on some claims that having parents of the same sex is bad for the children. Seventeen states and the District of Columbia allow same-sex marriage.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The legal campaign for marriage equality is picking up speed, moving at a pace that has surprised even longtime advocates and increasing the likelihood of a definitive Supreme Court test as early as next year. Efforts by some lawyers to plan a careful strategy for which cases to push forward to the high court have largely been put aside amid a rush of lower-court rulings striking down bans on same-sex marriage. The most recent came Thursday in Virginia, the first such ruling in the South.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | From Associated Press
A three-judge federal panel on Tuesday dismissed Utah's complaint that it lost a congressional seat because the Census Bureau did not count Utah residents who are Mormon missionaries overseas. The judges in a unanimous ruling said the missionaries represent only a fraction of Americans living overseas and that counting them would give Utah a huge advantage over other states.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's nominations for 36 federal judgeships have stalled this year because of a five-month dispute between a key Senate Republican and the White House over a vacant judgeship in Utah. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch, the Utah Republican who chairs the committee that oversees the federal judiciary, is demanding that the president nominate a conservative aide to Republican Gov. Mike Leavitt as a federal judge in Salt Lake City.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|