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NEWS
October 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Alexandria, Va., rejected an emergency request from a conservative state legislator that a feeding tube be reinserted into a severely brain-damaged man. Judge Albert Bryan held a hearing by telephone shortly after state Republican Delegate Robert Marshall made the request. The judge did not explain his ruling. Marshall had argued that depriving Hugh Finn of water and food violates Medicaid guidelines.
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OPINION
June 11, 2011
Like it or not, and we didn't like it, the Supreme Court's controversial decision in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission determined that corporations have a constitutional right to make independent expenditures in connection with an election — expenditures, that is, on behalf of (or against) a candidate, but not given directly to the candidate's campaign. Such spending, the court said, may not be limited. But the court left standing a 100-year-old prohibition on direct corporate contributions to political campaigns.
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NEWS
April 3, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the SS Central America broke apart in a hurricane and its passengers fought desperately to live, the fortunes harvested from California's gold fields no longer mattered. "The love of gold was forgotten in the anxiety and terror of the moment and many a man unbuckled his gold-stuffed belt and flung his hard-earned treasure upon the deck, some hoping to lighten their weight . . .
NATIONAL
October 20, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Acting on a request from the Obama administration, a federal appeals court in San Francisco on Wednesday lifted a judge's order that had halted enforcement of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays, leaving the much-disputed law in legal limbo. The three-judge panel said it was setting aside the judge's order temporarily to give it time to "consider fully the issues presented. " It gave opponents of the law until Monday to file a motion arguing why the judge's order should stay in effect.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | From The Washington Post
Just before midnight Tuesday, a federal judge reversed a lower court ruling and preserved--at least for now--Virginia's new ban on late-term, "partial-birth" abortions. J. Michael Luttig, a 44-year-old federal appeals judge from McLean, Va., known for his conservative philosophy, rejected a federal district court judge's ruling that the Virginia ban was too vague and likely unconstitutional. Luttig's ruling, which abortion rights advocates said they will appeal, put Virginia's U.S.
OPINION
June 11, 2011
Like it or not, and we didn't like it, the Supreme Court's controversial decision in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission determined that corporations have a constitutional right to make independent expenditures in connection with an election — expenditures, that is, on behalf of (or against) a candidate, but not given directly to the candidate's campaign. Such spending, the court said, may not be limited. But the court left standing a 100-year-old prohibition on direct corporate contributions to political campaigns.
NATIONAL
October 20, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
Acting on a request from the Obama administration, a federal appeals court in San Francisco on Wednesday lifted a judge's order that had halted enforcement of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays, leaving the much-disputed law in legal limbo. The three-judge panel said it was setting aside the judge's order temporarily to give it time to "consider fully the issues presented. " It gave opponents of the law until Monday to file a motion arguing why the judge's order should stay in effect.
NEWS
April 29, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An appeals court in Richmond has refused to rehear the federal government's lawsuit challenging the all-male admissions policy at the Virginia Military Institute. The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals voted 6 to 4 in favor of rehearing the case. However, three judges did not vote, and a rehearing requires approval of a majority of the court's 13 judges. Virginia is establishing a separate military-style program for women at Mary Baldwin College to comply with a ruling by an appeals panel.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | From Associated Press
The district that elected Virginia's first black member of Congress since Reconstruction is unconstitutional because it was drawn too heavily along racial lines, a panel of federal judges ruled Friday. Unless the ruling is overturned on appeal, Democratic Rep. Robert C. Scott will have to run in a redrawn district in 1998.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
A U.S. judge declared the federal death penalty law unconstitutional Tuesday in a ruling that defense lawyers said could provide a new argument for challenging capital cases across the country. U.S. District Judge William Sessions said recent cases, including a U.S. Supreme Court ruling which found that juries and not judges must hand out death sentences, have rendered existing death penalty law unusable.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal judge in Alexandria, Va., rejected an emergency request from a conservative state legislator that a feeding tube be reinserted into a severely brain-damaged man. Judge Albert Bryan held a hearing by telephone shortly after state Republican Delegate Robert Marshall made the request. The judge did not explain his ruling. Marshall had argued that depriving Hugh Finn of water and food violates Medicaid guidelines.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | From The Washington Post
Just before midnight Tuesday, a federal judge reversed a lower court ruling and preserved--at least for now--Virginia's new ban on late-term, "partial-birth" abortions. J. Michael Luttig, a 44-year-old federal appeals judge from McLean, Va., known for his conservative philosophy, rejected a federal district court judge's ruling that the Virginia ban was too vague and likely unconstitutional. Luttig's ruling, which abortion rights advocates said they will appeal, put Virginia's U.S.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the SS Central America broke apart in a hurricane and its passengers fought desperately to live, the fortunes harvested from California's gold fields no longer mattered. "The love of gold was forgotten in the anxiety and terror of the moment and many a man unbuckled his gold-stuffed belt and flung his hard-earned treasure upon the deck, some hoping to lighten their weight . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Union ratification of a tentative settlement in the United Mine Workers' bitter 10-month strike against Pittston Coal in three southeastern states is being delayed by the union's insistence that all court fines stemming from the strike be dropped, union President Richard Trumka said Friday in Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Virginia men on death row won reprieves from the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday as the justices concluded that conservative judges in Richmond had wrongly closed the courthouse door to their appeals. While federal judges should be cautious about second-guessing the handling of state cases, they should intervene when "clearly established" constitutional rights have been ignored, the justices said.
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