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NEWS
April 3, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors Monday began to deliberate the guilt or innocence of John M. Poindexter, former President Ronald Reagan's national security adviser, after a federal judge instructed them to ignore the politics of the Iran-Contra affair in reaching their verdict. Deflating the defense's contention that the retired rear admiral was the target of a political vendetta by Reagan's opponents, U.S. District Judge Harold H.
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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
District of Columbia police believe that a human skull found inside a Washington house during a drug raid was being used to put a hex on a D.C. Superior Court judge, and they have alerted the U.S. Marshals Service, authorities said. The name of the judge, which police would not release, was found on a note inside the skull during the raid. Police have asked the Marshals Service, which provides protection for judges here, to inform the judge.
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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
District of Columbia police believe that a human skull found inside a Washington house during a drug raid was being used to put a hex on a D.C. Superior Court judge, and they have alerted the U.S. Marshals Service, authorities said. The name of the judge, which police would not release, was found on a note inside the skull during the raid. Police have asked the Marshals Service, which provides protection for judges here, to inform the judge.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Judge Patricia M. Wald said Monday that she will step aside as chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to allow Judge Abner J. Mikva to take the post. Wald, 62, said she plans to step down before Mikva's 65th birthday, Jan. 21. Under the law, a federal judge who is 65 or older cannot become a chief judge.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter smiles rarely and takes notes often at his Iran-Contra trial. Because he has not testified yet, the jury must rely a good deal on its mental snapshots of his image as he sits at a table opposite them every day. But that image poses a riddle. The balding retired rear admiral has grown a mustache since his days in the Ronald Reagan Administration as Oliver L. North's boss. When he takes off his glasses, the mustache softens his manner.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Judge Patricia M. Wald said Monday that she will step aside as chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to allow Judge Abner J. Mikva to take the post. Wald, 62, said she plans to step down before Mikva's 65th birthday, Jan. 21. Under the law, a federal judge who is 65 or older cannot become a chief judge.
SPORTS
November 6, 1990 | BOB OATES
When the season began, critics of the run-and-shoot offense said it would never work in pro football. They called it a high school offense. They said that the NFL's first two run-and-shoot teams, the Houston Oilers and Detroit Lions, were just wasting their time. They were wrong. Or so it seems at the halfway point of a long season in which the Oilers are leading the AFC in offense, and the Lions are second in the NFC in points scored.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | BARTON GELLMAN, The Washington Post
As she stood before the camera crews in her first rainy moments of freedom, a reporter asked Elizabeth Morgan, "Where will you go?" "Wherever my fiance takes me," she replied, beaming. The man on her arm, unblinking in the lights, was Paul R. Michel, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington. But who was this earnest gentleman, and what was he doing in the picture? How did a federal judge find himself in the supporting cast of so sensational a piece of legal and political theater?
SPORTS
November 6, 1990 | BOB OATES
When the season began, critics of the run-and-shoot offense said it would never work in pro football. They called it a high school offense. They said that the NFL's first two run-and-shoot teams, the Houston Oilers and Detroit Lions, were just wasting their time. They were wrong. Or so it seems at the halfway point of a long season in which the Oilers are leading the AFC in offense, and the Lions are second in the NFC in points scored.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors Monday began to deliberate the guilt or innocence of John M. Poindexter, former President Ronald Reagan's national security adviser, after a federal judge instructed them to ignore the politics of the Iran-Contra affair in reaching their verdict. Deflating the defense's contention that the retired rear admiral was the target of a political vendetta by Reagan's opponents, U.S. District Judge Harold H.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter smiles rarely and takes notes often at his Iran-Contra trial. Because he has not testified yet, the jury must rely a good deal on its mental snapshots of his image as he sits at a table opposite them every day. But that image poses a riddle. The balding retired rear admiral has grown a mustache since his days in the Ronald Reagan Administration as Oliver L. North's boss. When he takes off his glasses, the mustache softens his manner.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | BARTON GELLMAN, The Washington Post
As she stood before the camera crews in her first rainy moments of freedom, a reporter asked Elizabeth Morgan, "Where will you go?" "Wherever my fiance takes me," she replied, beaming. The man on her arm, unblinking in the lights, was Paul R. Michel, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington. But who was this earnest gentleman, and what was he doing in the picture? How did a federal judge find himself in the supporting cast of so sensational a piece of legal and political theater?
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