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Judgment

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NEWS
January 31, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Imagine navigating a world of social situations in which you are a very poor judge of other people's motivations and state of mind. It could seem like a very random world indeed. That is the world as seen through the eyes of someone with profound autism . Without the capacity to infer or deduce correctly what other people know, and why other people act as they do, one's sense of cause and effect is severely impaired. When bad things happen, you can only assume it was the work of bad people acting badly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Sandy Banks
My column Tuesday on the courtroom tears of a gang member sentenced to 40 years in prison for a campus shooting resonated with readers - but not in the way I imagined it would. I considered the courtroom scene a cautionary message to other young men who glorify gangs and are enamored of guns: You could spend the rest of your life in prison over a stupid vendetta and a single violent act. But readers focused not just on the threat posed by hotheads with guns, but on the perceived injustice of such a long sentence for a young man who didn't kill anyone.
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NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Years ago, only half-facetiously, I suggested that the Constitution should be amended to require a year's waiting period before the passage of any law inspired by a made-for-TV movie. I feel the same way about legislation fueled by outrage about idiosyncratic miscarriages of justice (or perceived miscarriages). The latest example of this ambulance-chasing approach to lawmaking is a proposed bill by California Assemblyman Mike Gatto to prohibit defense attorneys from invoking “affluenza” as a defense at trial or as a mitigating factor in sentencing.
OPINION
April 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended this week with roughly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchanges, including more than 1.3 million at Covered California. That's an amazing and welcome result, considering how badly many of the exchanges stumbled when sign-ups began in October. Nevertheless, it's far too early to judge the success or failure of the healthcare law, given that key tests of the program's sustainability have yet to be passed.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2012
NEW YORK — A federal judge in New York has refused, for now, to halt collection of an $18 billion court judgment against the energy giant Chevron for environmental damage in an Ecuadorean rain forest. In one sense, the case shows the potential costs that can accrue from the massive consolidation of the oil industry into just a handful of mega-firms. Oil companies that have acquired former competitors wind up shouldering legal liabilities as well as assets. In this case, Courts in Ecuador have ordered San Rramon-based Chevron to pay the steep penalty for pollution that occurred when Texaco was operating in the forest, between 1972 and 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1991
How dare Ted Kennedy sit in judgment of Clarence Thomas? How dare Ted Kennedy sit in judgment of anyone? PAT SAMUELSON, Costa Mesa
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
An appellate court decision upholding a $30-million judgment against this High Sierra ski resort has left civic leaders scrambling to avoid financial catastrophe. Residents reacted bitterly to the breach-of-contract judgment, blaming the town of Mammoth Lake's five-member council and its staffers for the fiscal dilemma that has overshadowed the snowiest winter in memory in the scenic Mono County community of 7,500 year-round residents, situated about 300 miles north of Los Angeles on Highway 395. "We're fed up with the Town Council," fumed Steve Schwind, a real estate broker and 30-year resident.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Matea Gold, Washington Bureau
CARTAGENA, Colombia - President Obama said Sunday he would be angry if an internal investigation showed Secret Service personnel engaged in misconduct while in Colombia, because he expected representatives of the U.S. to act with the "utmost in dignity and probity. " But as he finished a weekend meeting with other Western Hemisphere leaders here, Obama said he would wait until the investigation concluded before passing judgment on the agents and military officers, part of a team that he said performed "extraordinary work on a day-to-day basis protecting me, my family and U.S. officials.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1993
The estate of a co-founder of the Phil & Jim's TV & Appliance discount chain has been ordered by an Orange County Superior Court Judge to pay the Anaheim-based corporation $1 million. The judgment stemmed from a suit brought two years ago by company chairman Philipe E. Delgado, who alleged that his late partner, James Ousterhout, had concealed a terminal illness for more than three years and falsified the company's books to increase income to his estate and heirs.
SPORTS
January 24, 1987
There are some worldly observers who believe that sports is infantile, that shedding tears over a defeat in a meaningless game is chi-chi and that it is gauche to argue on national television whether a ball bounced in or out. I am glad for the existence of such people because every time I hear their kaffeeklatsch chatter, I thank God that, in sports, I have an endeavor in which, at some point, all the talking stops. Games, matches and contests should be decided on the field, by the players who each have an equal opportunity to win. Finger-pointing, arguments and protests have never been more apparent and the recent instant-replay rule seems just a shield for officials instead of a help to the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
On Thursday, James Franco was looking like a creepy old guy or a PR maestro for his leaked social-media come-on to a 17-year-old Scottish tourist. Come Friday, Franco was just looking embarrassed.  The 35-year-old actor appeared on "Live! With Kelly and Michael" and admitted his gaffe, saying he was "embarrassed," "doubly embarrassed" and had "used bad judgment" over social media with the fan. He didn't address the difference in their ages. The story was brought up first thing during Franco's appearance on "Live!
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | Meghan Daum
Rush Limbaugh is right on this one. The reporting on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared March 8, has turned into a spectacle - not the good kind. It's all "such a show," Limbaugh told his listeners Monday. "We've got anchors and anchorettes who don't know beans about even why an airplane flies. They couldn't explain the concept of air pressure differential or lift to you if their jobs depended on it. " Actually it's even worse than "such a show": The lack of any real information has pushed television news to new levels of unintentional self-parody.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Shan Li
A U.S. judge ruled in favor of Chevron Corp. and declared a $9.5-billion judgment in Ecuador against the oil giant for environmental damage was obtained by fraud and racketeering. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan in Manhattan ruled Tuesday that the 2011 judgment against the San Ramon, Calif., company on behalf of thousands of villagers living in the Lago Agrio region of the Amazon rain forest was procured by "corrupt means," including coercion and money laundering. Kaplan said that Steven Donziger, a New York lawyer, along with attorneys in Ecuador, poisoned the case by promising money to a judge for a favorable ruling and submitting faulty evidence, among other actions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
Perhaps in an attempt to live up to the drama implied by its apocalyptic-sounding name, the second night of the "final judgment" phase on "American Idol" included twists and tricks that were unexpected at least, it appeared, by the contestants themselves. At the top of the show, 17 of the top 30 slots - 15 guys and 15 young women - who would be featured in next week's live rounds had been claimed. And far more than 13 singers sat stressed out, their fates suspended, in the holding room.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
As it kicked off its "final judgment" round on Thursday, a name that one contestant griped sounded alarmingly apocalyptic, "American Idol" showed a clip of Harry Connick Jr. lecturing the 48 contestants who'd made it to the solo round. "At the top of my list of pet peeves is hearing people bitch about that they don't feel good," he told the stressed-out singers, some of them apparently sick. "Just suck it up and sing. It's entertainment. " As Connick gave his little speech, the following words flashed on the screen: "No more Mr. Nice Guy. " PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV Poor Harry.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It's been a year since Christopher Dorner went on a killing spree to avenge his firing from the Los Angeles Police Department. Over nine days, he killed two civilians and two law enforcement officers and led authorities on a manhunt that crossed Southern California before he died in a burned-out cabin in Big Bear following a shootout. Communities were nervous, and police feared Dorner might target anyone in a uniform. All of that makes it understandable that police officers were on edge in the early hours of Feb. 7 last year as they took up positions to guard the home of a potential Dorner target in Torrance.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2009 | Associated Press
Two men who contend PepsiCo Inc. stole their idea to sell bottled water sued the snack- and drink-maker in Wisconsin and won a $1.26-billion judgment last month after the company didn't respond. PepsiCo, which calls the accusation "dubious," says it didn't know about the lawsuit until almost a week after the court granted the award without a trial. The company wants the court to toss out the ruling, known as a default judgment, or at least give PepsiCo a chance to fight the accusation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By David Colker
When Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell won the best actor Academy Award in 1962 for his role in "Judgment at Nuremberg," he gave a short thank-you speech in which he recalled being questioned by a customs official upon first arriving in the United States. "He was asking me what I was doing here, and I said, 'I'm going to do a film,'" Schell told the glittering crowd in his accented English. "And he said to me, 'Good luck, boy.' And I think that was very unusual for a customs man. And I can tell him now that I had it. " Undoubtedly, Schell, whose family fled the Nazis when he was a boy, made his own luck - not only as a celebrated actor who amassed more than 100 film and TV credits, but also as a director of films, documentaries, plays and opera.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Years ago, only half-facetiously, I suggested that the Constitution should be amended to require a year's waiting period before the passage of any law inspired by a made-for-TV movie. I feel the same way about legislation fueled by outrage about idiosyncratic miscarriages of justice (or perceived miscarriages). The latest example of this ambulance-chasing approach to lawmaking is a proposed bill by California Assemblyman Mike Gatto to prohibit defense attorneys from invoking “affluenza” as a defense at trial or as a mitigating factor in sentencing.
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