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Judicial Misconduct

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1998
The alcoholism that destroyed Judge Robert Bradley's career began 30 years ago when he turned to drinking to cope with the horror and bloodshed of the Vietnam War, a psychiatrist told a panel reviewing misconduct charges against the jurist. Dr. Lloyd Moglen testified Tuesday, the final day of Bradley's hearing, that the 57-year-old judge suffers from post-traumatic stress syndrome.
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NEWS
November 23, 1988 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
When Robert H. Furey Jr. ran for Los Angeles municipal judge two years ago, the voters lacked an important piece of information about him. Furey, a Catalina Justice Court judge, had been under investigation by the state Commission on Judicial Performance for 22 months for misconduct, including the repeated jailing of a woman who had filed a complaint about him. Furey lost the election, and eight days later the commission recommended to the state Supreme Court that he be removed from the bench.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Claiming its trial was tainted by judicial misconduct, Microsoft Corp. on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to set aside the landmark ruling that it violated antitrust laws and to force the government to start over with a new judge. The software giant also asked a federal appeals court to delay any further proceedings until the Supreme Court decides whether to accept the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1988 | TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writer
Former Catalina Justice Court Judge Robert H. Furey Jr., ousted last year by the California Supreme Court for repeatedly abusing his contempt powers and other acts of judicial misconduct, has been hired as a deputy Los Angeles County public defender, the head of the office said Thursday. "He did a good job when he worked for us before," said Public Defender Wilbur F. Littlefield.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Three of the five justices on Vermont's Supreme Court have been accused of judicial misconduct, and Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin asked them Thursday to step down until the charges are resolved. The allegations range from attempts to derail a criminal investigation against an assistant county judge to an effort to fire a court employee who rebuffed a sexual advance by one of the justices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2001 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of California's judicial watchdog agency said Thursday that his panel will hire an independent examiner to investigate charges that its director engaged in conflict of interest during a pending disciplinary action against a Sonoma County judge. Michael A. Kahn, chairman of the Commission on Judicial Performance, said the investigator will look into allegations by a Los Angeles lawyer against Victoria Henley, the agency's director and chief counsel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Orange County Superior Court judge accused of releasing suspects at the request of a longtime friend has been cleared of most misconduct charges by a panel of the state Commission on Judicial Performance. The three-judge panel, in a report released Thursday, said Luis A. Cardenas did not show favoritism by releasing or reducing the bail of more than 20 clients of criminal defense attorney Leonard Basinger.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
After protests by local judges and public officials, the state Judicial Performance Commission announced Thursday that it has decided not to seek the removal of a Northern California judge it accused of repeated delays in deciding cases. The commission, in an unusual action, said it had reconsidered the matter and instead had asked the state Supreme Court to publicly censure Judge Bernard P.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once he was a dominant and respected presence on the San Diego Superior Court--known for his hard work, confident manner and booming voice. But on Thursday, former Superior Court Judge Michael Greer--now sick, disgraced and described in court papers as suicidal--stood before a federal judge and struggled to take responsibility for "this incredible disaster" that led him to plead guilty to taking bribes from a flamboyant trial attorney. In the end, U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Judicial Performance Commission said Friday it had rejected a proposal that for the first time would have put non-judges in control of the watchdog agency. The commission, however, did vote to go forward with proposals to the Legislature that would increase the commission's power to discipline judges for misconduct.
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