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Judicial Performance

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001
Your April 23 editorial calls for an overhaul of California's judicial disciplinary system, advocating the adoption of timetables for the commission's investigations and giving more serious consideration to complaints from supervising judges. Each year, the commission resolves approximately 1,000 complaints. In 2000, the average length of time from the commission's receipt of a complaint to the disposition date was 3.7 months. The only state of which I am aware that has a state-mandated limit is Texas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Jack Leonard
A Los Angeles County judge acquitted Thursday of battery in a trial that revolved around a dispute over a bag of dog waste will return to his old assignment handling felony trials, the county's presiding judge told The Times. Superior Court Judge Craig Richman will resume his post Monday in the same courtroom in the downtown criminal courts building, Richman's attorney, James Blatt, said. Richman, who was transferred to the Chatsworth courthouse after the battery charge was filed in October, heard the news about his assignment soon after Thursday morning's not guilty verdict, Blatt said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Alhambra Municipal Court judge who jailed a Temple City man for four days for forgetting to license and vaccinate his dog was publicly reprimanded Monday by the state Commission on Judicial Performance. The commission found that Judge Michael A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
A longtime Orange County judge who said that a rape victim "didn't put up a fight" and that her sexual assault was only "technical" has been publicly admonished by a state agency that said his remarks seemed outdated, insensitive and possibly biased. The Commission on Judicial Performance said Superior Court Judge Derek G. Johnson's comments breached judicial ethics. At a sentencing in 2008, Johnson denied a prosecutor's call to impose a 16-year prison term on Metin Gurel, who had been convicted of rape, forcible oral copulation, domestic battery, stalking and making threats against his former live-in girlfriend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2012 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County Superior Court commissioner who made "discourteous, undignified, gratuitous and denigrating remarks" during family law cases was publicly admonished Tuesday by a state agency overseeing judges' discipline. The Commission on Judicial Performance determined that Commissioner Alan H. Friedenthal should be "severely publicly admonished" for misconduct, including "humor at the expense of litigants," during five cases over which he presided from June 2007 to January 2009, according to an 18-page order made public Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
In the long-running saga of Lindsay Lohan's legal troubles, every single misstep - each dirty drug test, every missed court appearance, even a profane message etched on her fingernail - was publicized, scrutinized and dissected in tabloids the world over. But there were two allegations of misconduct that came and went quietly, out of public view. They weren't transgressions by the former teen star growing up in the limelight. They were by two veteran judges presiding over her case.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court suspended a judge who is being investigated for his role in a dispute over fees involving prominent attorney Richard "Dickie" Scruggs. The court sided with the Mississippi Commission on Judicial Performance, which was concerned that Hinds County Circuit Judge Bobby DeLaughter might have accepted a bribe. The commission claimed the judge had improper communications outside court in a case he ruled on. It also said he engaged in willful and prejudicial misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2005 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
A state agency began formal proceedings Wednesday to determine whether to force Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Rodney E. Nelson off the bench because of a degenerative brain disease that the panel claims "seriously interferes" with his performance. The state Commission on Judicial Performance, which has the sole authority to involuntarily retire a judge, did not detail the disease or its alleged consequences. But attorney Clarke Holland of Emeryville, Calif.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | JERRY HICKS and JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writers
The state Commission on Judicial Performance announced today it will drop formal proceedings against Harbor Municipal Judge Brian R. Carter when his resignation becomes effective next month, on the condition that he not seek judicial office again or accept any appointment or assignment to the bench. Carter's decision to resign in mid-February was disclosed Monday. It follows four years of investigations of Carter and Harbor Municipal Judge Calvin P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1985
Moore is correct. A justice of the California Supreme Court--or any other judge--should be voted out of office only if that judge's decisions have not been representative of the constitutional role of a judge. In the present case, Chief Justice Bird has been accused of improper judicial conduct by usurping the legislative role, for instance, by invariably voting to reverse a death penalty sentence, thereby disregarding U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning capital punishment.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
Remember the movie "Desperately Seeking Susan," in which a young woman (played by Madonna, in what some thought wasn't much of a stretch) wreaks havoc on the lives of most of the folks she comes in contact with? I always thought Susan was fictional. But it turns out she has a real-life counterpart: Lindsay Lohan. Lohan's troubles have been well documented. What's new is the collateral damage on the legal system. Two judges have been disciplined by California's Commission on Judicial Performance for their handling of Lohan's DUI case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
In the long-running saga of Lindsay Lohan's legal troubles, every single misstep - each dirty drug test, every missed court appearance, even a profane message etched on her fingernail - was publicized, scrutinized and dissected in tabloids the world over. But there were two allegations of misconduct that came and went quietly, out of public view. They weren't transgressions by the former teen star growing up in the limelight. They were by two veteran judges presiding over her case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
An Orange County Superior Court judge has been rebuked by a state oversight committee for violating judicial ethics in trying to help his wife avoid paying late fees levied on an unpaid traffic citation. In a decision released Thursday, the Commission on Judicial Performance issued a public censure of Judge Salvador Sarmiento for "improper conduct in seeking preferential treatment" for his wife. The commission said Sarmiento bypassed typical procedures by asking a subordinate — a court commissioner — to schedule a trial date for his wife after she received a November 2010 citation for failing to yield to a pedestrian in a crosswalk and ignored multiple notices from the court to deal with the ticket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2011 | By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
A longtime Orange County judge accused of waiving traffic fines for friends, co-workers and even his minister has been ordered to appear before a statewide judicial panel that could recommend his removal from office. The hearing will examine a series of traffic cases that Superior Court Judge Richard W. Stanford Jr. allegedly had moved to his courtroom on behalf of acquaintances, relatives and co-workers. The complaint from the Commission on Judicial Performance formally documents nine allegations of misconduct from 2003 to 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2010 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
A San Bernardino County judge who was disciplined a decade ago for making sexually suggestive comments and for other inappropriate conduct toward women was publicly admonished Tuesday for making crude gestures and improper remarks. Among the incidents that led to his latest discipline, Superior Court Judge John B. Gibson displayed sarcasm and annoyance toward a female defense attorney during a hearing in May, according to the state's Commission on Judicial Performance. Gibson later spoke to the attorney in his chambers, showing irritation with her as he criticized a male lawyer who had appeared on her behalf at a hearing earlier in the day, the commission said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2009 | Victoria Kim
A former Los Angeles County Superior Court family law commissioner was publicly censured Wednesday and barred from taking on future judicial assignments for failing to decide a number of cases within the time required by law. According to the state Commission on Judicial Performance, which investigates misconduct by judges, one litigant complained to court officials that commissioner Ann Dobbs delayed ruling on a case for nearly five years.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court suspended a judge who is being investigated for his role in a dispute over fees involving prominent attorney Richard "Dickie" Scruggs. The court sided with the Mississippi Commission on Judicial Performance, which was concerned that Hinds County Circuit Judge Bobby DeLaughter might have accepted a bribe. The commission claimed the judge had improper communications outside court in a case he ruled on. It also said he engaged in willful and prejudicial misconduct.
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