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NATIONAL
July 14, 2009
Remarks delivered by Judge Sonia Sotomayor at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I also want to thank Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand for that kind introduction. In recent weeks, I have had the privilege and pleasure of meeting 89 gracious senators, including all the members of this committee. I thank you for the time you have spent with me.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 15, 2013 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - During Supreme Court arguments, Justice Clarence Thomas sits mute, not asking a single question while his colleagues on the bench jockey to get in the next interrogatory. But this week, in front of 1,300 adoring conservative lawyers in a Washington hotel ballroom, another Clarence Thomas emerged: loquacious, folksy, irreverent, and totally at ease with his audience and himself. The result was a glimpse of the court's most controversial figure letting down his hair, talking candidly about not just his upbringing but his feelings and his approach toward judging.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1985
I would be angered by Gary McDowell's letter to the editor (Nov. 19) regarding Justice William J. Brennan Jr. of the U.S. Supreme Court and the judicial philosophy of Chief Justice John Marshall if it did not so neatly demonstrate the seeming ignorance of history, the apparent inability to read simple English, and the ethical insensitivity that characterize far too many Reagan Administration officials. McDowell asserts that Brennan's (and The Times') understanding of Marshall's philosophy is flawed.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage and Kathleen B. Hennessey, Washington Bureau
Justice Antonin Scalia's appearance at a meeting organized by the House Tea Party caucus and Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) on Monday provoked new cries from liberals and some academics that conservative justices are shedding the appearance of impartiality. The session, part of what Bachmann calls a series of constitutional seminars, was closed to the media. Lawmakers said Scalia advised them to read the Federalist Papers and to follow the Constitution as it was written. University of Texas law professor Lucas A. Powe, a historian of the liberal Warren Court, said Scalia's appearance made the court look partisan.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In his new, bestselling memoir, "My Grandfather's Son," Justice Clarence Thomas tells the story of his personal struggle to overcome poverty and racism. Raised by his grandparents in Savannah, Ga., he credits his success to his grandfather's strict work ethic and to those who shaped his early life and helped him along the way. "Their story is my story," he writes.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Sonia Sotomayor deftly dodged conservative senators' efforts to pin her down on her "judicial philosophy" on issues like abortion and gun control Wednesday, leaving those on both sides of the issues frustrated, said legal experts following the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. But her restraint drew praise from some as evidence that she is a moderate judge who will decide cases on the facts, not preconceived opinions.
OPINION
July 2, 2005
Both sides have been gearing up for a brawl, and now it appears that it will be a double bill. In coming months, President Bush and the Senate will probably be filling two Supreme Court seats: those of Sandra Day O'Connor, who resigned Friday, and Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, whose health is in peril. This makes it doubly important to establish some ground rules. They have been in flux since the bitter fight over President Reagan's failed nomination of Robert H. Bork almost two decades ago. Here, though, is what they should be. First, advise and consent means advise and consent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991
"Judge Thomas, you have come here for confirmation with a judicial philosophy different from that of any other candidate to appear before this body." These (as nearly as I can remember them) were the pompous, posturing words used by Sen. Joseph Biden to open the hearings that will decide whether or not Clarence Thomas will receive a seat on the Supreme Court. Their reference to Thomas' belief in what is termed "natural law" indicates the strategy that our so-called "liberals" have chosen to employ to defeat his nomination.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It sounded a bit strange from the start: an election contest in which the candidates are barred from telling the voters what they think. And the more they considered the ban, the more it seemed unconstitutional, a violation of the candidates' right to freedom of speech. The Supreme Court justices, all of whom are appointed, took a hard look Tuesday at state elections for judges, and they spent much of the hour voicing their view that states cannot prohibit candidates from speaking their minds.
OPINION
May 23, 2002
The White House last year agreed to form a bipartisan committee to vet nominees for federal district judgeships in California. The idea behind it was a good one: to identify qualified and moderate candidates for the bench whom the president could nominate and whom both parties would vote to confirm. The committee, chosen by the White House and Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, has worked well; the first nominees it put forward were confirmed in less than three months, a record for the Senate.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Sonia Sotomayor deftly dodged conservative senators' efforts to pin her down on her "judicial philosophy" on issues like abortion and gun control Wednesday, leaving those on both sides of the issues frustrated, said legal experts following the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. But her restraint drew praise from some as evidence that she is a moderate judge who will decide cases on the facts, not preconceived opinions.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2009
Remarks delivered by Judge Sonia Sotomayor at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I also want to thank Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand for that kind introduction. In recent weeks, I have had the privilege and pleasure of meeting 89 gracious senators, including all the members of this committee. I thank you for the time you have spent with me.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In his new, bestselling memoir, "My Grandfather's Son," Justice Clarence Thomas tells the story of his personal struggle to overcome poverty and racism. Raised by his grandparents in Savannah, Ga., he credits his success to his grandfather's strict work ethic and to those who shaped his early life and helped him along the way. "Their story is my story," he writes.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2005 | David G. Savage and Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. pledged Tuesday to bring "modesty and humility" to his job as a justice on the high court, saying the judges did not have a "commission to solve society's problems." "Judges must be constantly aware that their role, while important, is limited," he wrote in response to a 67-page questionnaire from the Senate. Roberts also reported a personal net worth of $5.2 million, most of it in stocks and mutual funds.
OPINION
July 2, 2005
Both sides have been gearing up for a brawl, and now it appears that it will be a double bill. In coming months, President Bush and the Senate will probably be filling two Supreme Court seats: those of Sandra Day O'Connor, who resigned Friday, and Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, whose health is in peril. This makes it doubly important to establish some ground rules. They have been in flux since the bitter fight over President Reagan's failed nomination of Robert H. Bork almost two decades ago. Here, though, is what they should be. First, advise and consent means advise and consent.
OPINION
May 23, 2002
The White House last year agreed to form a bipartisan committee to vet nominees for federal district judgeships in California. The idea behind it was a good one: to identify qualified and moderate candidates for the bench whom the president could nominate and whom both parties would vote to confirm. The committee, chosen by the White House and Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, has worked well; the first nominees it put forward were confirmed in less than three months, a record for the Senate.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2013 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - During Supreme Court arguments, Justice Clarence Thomas sits mute, not asking a single question while his colleagues on the bench jockey to get in the next interrogatory. But this week, in front of 1,300 adoring conservative lawyers in a Washington hotel ballroom, another Clarence Thomas emerged: loquacious, folksy, irreverent, and totally at ease with his audience and himself. The result was a glimpse of the court's most controversial figure letting down his hair, talking candidly about not just his upbringing but his feelings and his approach toward judging.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2005 | David G. Savage and Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. pledged Tuesday to bring "modesty and humility" to his job as a justice on the high court, saying the judges did not have a "commission to solve society's problems." "Judges must be constantly aware that their role, while important, is limited," he wrote in response to a 67-page questionnaire from the Senate. Roberts also reported a personal net worth of $5.2 million, most of it in stocks and mutual funds.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It sounded a bit strange from the start: an election contest in which the candidates are barred from telling the voters what they think. And the more they considered the ban, the more it seemed unconstitutional, a violation of the candidates' right to freedom of speech. The Supreme Court justices, all of whom are appointed, took a hard look Tuesday at state elections for judges, and they spent much of the hour voicing their view that states cannot prohibit candidates from speaking their minds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991
"Judge Thomas, you have come here for confirmation with a judicial philosophy different from that of any other candidate to appear before this body." These (as nearly as I can remember them) were the pompous, posturing words used by Sen. Joseph Biden to open the hearings that will decide whether or not Clarence Thomas will receive a seat on the Supreme Court. Their reference to Thomas' belief in what is termed "natural law" indicates the strategy that our so-called "liberals" have chosen to employ to defeat his nomination.
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