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Judicial Privilege

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November 5, 2004 | From Associated Press
Lawyers who offer to help reporters by sending them copies of court documents by fax or e-mail do so at the peril of losing their immunity to defamation suits, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ruled. Under a long-recognized doctrine called "judicial privilege," attorneys who file lawsuits -- even frivolous or malicious ones -- are protected from being sued for slander or libel over the accusations they make in court.
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NEWS
May 28, 1997 | From The Times Washington Bureau
JUDICIAL PRIVILEGE: Moments after swearing in Bill Clinton to his second term of office, Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist was heard to utter a somewhat ominous-sounding "good luck"--as in, "You'll need it."
SPORTS
February 26, 2008 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Roger Clemens could be days away from learning whether Congress will refer him for a perjury investigation and when a Texas court might decide whether to allow his defamation suit to proceed. In testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Clemens said he never used steroids or human growth hormone, contradicting the testimony of his former trainer Brian McNamee. Rep. Henry A.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's lawyers and House prosecutors filed briefs with the Senate Monday, with the White House insisting that impeachment charges "do not rise to the level of "high crimes and misdemeanors" and House prosecutors arguing that "this case is not about sex or private conduct."
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