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Judicial Reform

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NEWS
June 16, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Legislation to dramatically reform California's lax and secretive system of disciplining judges passed a key test Wednesday as the Assembly Judiciary Committee approved it without a dissenting vote. Chaired by Assemblyman Philip Isenberg (D-Sacramento), the committee heard testimony Wednesday from people representing a broad range of interests.
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WORLD
January 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - In a country where citizens are regularly victimized by corrupt and abusive police, a court ruling freeing a woman from prison because of police mistreatment would seem welcome. Instead, many Mexicans are outraged. Ending a long legal case that had generated front-page headlines on two continents, the Mexican Supreme Court this week freed Florence Cassez, a 38-year-old French woman jailed for kidnapping, because authorities had trampled her right to due process.
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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | ANNE H. HARRISON, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
While democratic changes spread through Eastern Europe, San Francisco lawyer Steven Mayo is helping countries to reform their justice systems. "The world seems to be involved in legal reform; people are demanding a greater role in justice systems," Mayo said during a recent visit to Buenos Aires. "My feeling from my readings is that governments believe they cannot stay in power without giving a little," said Mayo.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2006 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
The Nevada Supreme Court on Tuesday indicated that it was prepared to take substantive steps toward reforming the state's judiciary, which has been plagued by allegations of cronyism, blatant conflicts of interest and judges who hand down money awards to friends and business associates. The justices made no final decisions and reserved the right to refer the measures to study groups or quash them altogether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | BEATRIZ MAGALONI, Beatriz Magaloni holds a law degree in Mexico and is associated with CIDAC (the Center of Research and Development) there. She also is a visiting fellow at Harvard University
President Ernesto Zedillo was elected in August 1994, promising a far-reaching judicial reform that theoretically would reduce corruption, bring state officials under the surveillance of the law and provide Mexican citizens with equal access to justice. Important as this reform is, citizens are yet to observe direct benefits from it.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Britain and the Irish Republic have become entangled in a potentially damaging dispute about judicial reform in Northern Ireland that has complicated relations between the two countries and cast a cloud over their two-year-old agreement to reduce religious strife in the troubled province.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2006 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Banning judges from personally soliciting or accepting campaign contributions would not represent an improper restriction on their constitutional rights and would help restore the integrity of Nevada's troubled judiciary, an advocate for reform has argued. The Nevada Supreme Court is expected to decide in coming months whether to implement the ban. The measure would put Nevada in line with much of the rest of the nation, and advocates believe it would mark a significant step in judicial reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER PUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 13 years, Patti Linebaugh has waited to see the terror in Theodore Frank's face as cyanide fumes rise around him in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison. "I want him to feel the fear that he put into Amy and all those other children," said the 53-year-old Camarillo woman. "I want him to see that someone else has finally had the upper hand."
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
El Salvador's leftist guerrillas Wednesday handed the government a sweeping proposal for an indefinite cease-fire in exchange for major political reforms to bring an end to their country's decade-long civil war by next February. The three-phase plan--the most detailed offer by either side since the war began--calls for a new Supreme Court, attorney general and Legislative Assembly but would leave in place the right-wing government of President Alfredo Cristiani.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | RON PRINCE, Ron Prince is chairman of Save Our State, the campaign committee for Proposition 187, and a coauthor of 187
Proposition 187 has finally been released from its purgatory in federal district court and now can work its way through the appellate system, where its chances of success are far better. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer served her cohorts well and delayed the "Save Our State" initiative as long as possible. But her final ruling reveals a curious logic that betrays her political agenda at last.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2006 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Banning judges from personally soliciting or accepting campaign contributions would not represent an improper restriction on their constitutional rights and would help restore the integrity of Nevada's troubled judiciary, an advocate for reform has argued. The Nevada Supreme Court is expected to decide in coming months whether to implement the ban. The measure would put Nevada in line with much of the rest of the nation, and advocates believe it would mark a significant step in judicial reform.
NEWS
February 7, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Immigrants fighting to stay in the United States will face a quicker road to deportation under a judicial reorganization plan unveiled by federal authorities Wednesday. The plan, which drew immediate fire from immigrant rights activists, will restructure the board that hears appeals on immigration claims in an effort to eliminate a growing backlog of more than 55,000 cases. Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | RON PRINCE, Ron Prince is chairman of Save Our State, the campaign committee for Proposition 187, and a coauthor of 187
Proposition 187 has finally been released from its purgatory in federal district court and now can work its way through the appellate system, where its chances of success are far better. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer served her cohorts well and delayed the "Save Our State" initiative as long as possible. But her final ruling reveals a curious logic that betrays her political agenda at last.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997 | BEATRIZ MAGALONI, Beatriz Magaloni holds a law degree in Mexico and is associated with CIDAC (the Center of Research and Development) there. She also is a visiting fellow at Harvard University
President Ernesto Zedillo was elected in August 1994, promising a far-reaching judicial reform that theoretically would reduce corruption, bring state officials under the surveillance of the law and provide Mexican citizens with equal access to justice. Important as this reform is, citizens are yet to observe direct benefits from it.
NEWS
February 19, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a saying legal reformers toss around often these days, in gloomy conversations marked by sighs and fretful frowns. "Nothing costs the state more," they say, "than a cheap judicial system." They do not need to elaborate. For five years now, Russia has been trying to cast off the repressive legal system it inherited from the Soviet Union. Politicians talk of forging a "law-based government" with a truly independent judiciary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994
Re "190 and 191: 'Yes' on Judicial Reform," editorial, Oct. 10: Prop. 190 rewrites the way judges are disciplined in California. California was the first state to set up a commission to handle complaints against judges and since 1960, it has helped us maintain a very high quality judiciary. Now the Legislature has a new set of rules it wants you to approve. The Legislature designed Prop. 190 so it could control the judiciary by dominating the Commission on Judicial Performance.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | PHILIP WILLIAMS, United Press International
Steal a goat, you lose a hand. Use a gun to steal it, you may lose your hand and foot. Such is the law of sharia, the Islamic judicial code in this East African nation, the abolition of which has become a powerful new organizing weapon in the arsenal of non-Muslim rebels leading a southern insurgency.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, defending himself from internal critics on the left and right, said in a speech made public Tuesday that overcoming resistance to reform is still the main task facing the Soviet Union in the years ahead. He warned that disaster would follow if the Soviet Union were to abandon his drive for economic and social restructuring, or perestroika, because opponents are frightened of sweeping economic and social changes.
NEWS
November 4, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joaquin Villalobos, who as a master guerrilla strategist eluded capture during 12 years of civil war, completed Day 16 as a prisoner Thursday, awaiting the outcome of a defamation lawsuit. Two years after peace accords ended the war, legal maneuvering has done to Villalobos what an army backed by billions of U.S. dollars never could. Villalobos was sued by a wealthy businessman he accused of having financed the right-wing death squads that terrorized Salvadorans through much of the 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1994
Two measures on the Nov. 8 ballot would bring needed reform to the state's judicial system. Proposition 190 would reform the state's Commission on Judicial Performance. California led the nation when it created the first judicial discipline system in 1960, but more than 30 years later that process is demonstrably clubby, secretive and ineffective at disciplining errant or incompetent judges.
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