Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudicial Review
IN THE NEWS

Judicial Review

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
February 18, 2013
The idea that the federal courts should play some role in deciding whether the government may kill U.S. citizens abroad allied with Al Qaeda has suddenly gained traction in Washington. During confirmation hearings for John Brennan, President Obama's nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the chair of the Intelligence Committee, said she would be considering legislation to establish a court to "review the conduct" of U.S. drone strikes. Brennan himself, asked by Sen. Angus King (I-Maine)
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Federal law allows the government to seize the ill-gotten gains of convicted drug dealers and other criminals, which is fair enough. But the law also permits prosecutors to freeze allegedly tainted assets of defendants who haven't yet been tried, in some cases making it impossible for them to afford the lawyer of their choice. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will be asked to require additional judicial review of such seizures. It should do so, despite exaggerated claims by the Obama administration that new protections would undermine the criminal justice system.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 7, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. District judge on Tuesday characterized accused Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry L. Nichols as an enemy of the federal government and said that the weight of evidence against him is "heavy" and "great." In a written order following up on his decision last week to deny bail for Nichols, Judge David L. Russell also went through the government's case against the 40-year-old Army veteran, point by point.
OPINION
July 19, 2013 | By John J. Gibbons
On Friday, a federal judge in Washington will hear a challenge to the Obama administration's approach to targeted killings. I find myself frustrated by how little progress we've made. In 2004, I represented Guantanamo Bay detainees in the Supreme Court in Rasul vs. Bush, challenging President George W. Bush's claim that he could hold noncitizens at Guantanamo without judicial review based on the administration's unilateral claim that the detainees were enemies of the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1995 | H. ERIC SCHOCKMAN, H. Eric Schockman of Sherman Oaks teaches political science at the University of Southern California
Since the passage of Proposition 187, attacks have been launched against elected officials for raising questions about the constitutionality of the voter-approved measure. One Valley activist recently accused the Los Angeles school board and City Council members of "playing hooky during Democracy 101" because they have not simply accepted the "voice of the people" and the "will of the majority" but have sought clarification of Proposition 187's legality.
OPINION
July 19, 2013 | By John J. Gibbons
On Friday, a federal judge in Washington will hear a challenge to the Obama administration's approach to targeted killings. I find myself frustrated by how little progress we've made. In 2004, I represented Guantanamo Bay detainees in the Supreme Court in Rasul vs. Bush, challenging President George W. Bush's claim that he could hold noncitizens at Guantanamo without judicial review based on the administration's unilateral claim that the detainees were enemies of the United States.
NATIONAL
September 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A judicial review board has launched an inquiry into allegations against a state Supreme Court justice, including claims that he threatened to "whip" the chief justice and intentionally delayed cases as payback before his term on the court ends. The complaint, dated Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1988 | CHRISTOPHER D. KNOPF, Christopher D. Knopf is a law student and member of the Law Review at the University of Virginia.
Passage of legislation elevating the Veteran's Administration to the President's Cabinet is a virtual certainty now that Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) has agreed not to attach a rider that would have provided for judicial review of veterans' claims. The White House indicated that it would veto the entire bill if such a provision were included.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1987 | MICHAEL MOORE, Michael Moore is a professor of law at UC Berkeley and at USC, and is a consultant for the People for the American Way.
The confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee have revealed that there are two Robert H. Borks: the Bork who forthrightly said what he thought before he was nominated to the Supreme Court, and the Bork who wants to be confirmed as an associate justice of that court. The pre-nomination Bork we have known for 25 years from numerous speeches, articles and judicial decisions.
OPINION
November 27, 2012
Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi overreached last week when he asserted near-dictatorial power under a "temporary" decree that placed his actions beyond judicial review. The move galvanized his political opponents, dismayed some of his supporters and jolted the Egyptian stock market - and on Monday, Morsi wisely retreated somewhat. But Egypt's Supreme Judicial Council also gave some ground by tacitly agreeing that the judiciary wouldn't thwart the drafting of a new constitution, the scenario Morsi had apparently been seeking to avert with his decree.
OPINION
February 18, 2013
The idea that the federal courts should play some role in deciding whether the government may kill U.S. citizens abroad allied with Al Qaeda has suddenly gained traction in Washington. During confirmation hearings for John Brennan, President Obama's nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the chair of the Intelligence Committee, said she would be considering legislation to establish a court to "review the conduct" of U.S. drone strikes. Brennan himself, asked by Sen. Angus King (I-Maine)
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- Former Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Sunday said there should be an outside check on the power of a president to order drone strikes on U.S. citizens. Gates, a former CIA director who served as Defense chief under Presidents Obama and George  W. Bush, said decisions to execute Americans should be subject to some outside review, perhaps by a panel of judges or by Congress. “I think that the rules and the practices that the Obama administration has followed are quite stringent and are not being abused,” said Gates, speaking with Candy Crowley on CNN's “State of the Union.” “But who is to say about a future president?
WORLD
November 27, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - President Mohamed Morsi suggested Monday that he would scale back broad powers he assumed last week but failed to appease Egypt's judiciary, which would still lack oversight of some institutions including the Islamist-led assembly drafting a new constitution. Morsi and senior judges met for nearly five hours to discuss differences resulting from the president's declaration that his office was free from judicial review. Morsi told judges that the decree was meant to be temporary, and mainly aimed at shielding the long-troubled constitutional assembly from any judicial attempt to disband it. Presidential spokesman Yasser Ali said after the meeting that Morsi's decree was not designed to "infringe" on the judiciary, suggesting not all of the president's actions would be immune from court review.
OPINION
November 27, 2012
Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi overreached last week when he asserted near-dictatorial power under a "temporary" decree that placed his actions beyond judicial review. The move galvanized his political opponents, dismayed some of his supporters and jolted the Egyptian stock market - and on Monday, Morsi wisely retreated somewhat. But Egypt's Supreme Judicial Council also gave some ground by tacitly agreeing that the judiciary wouldn't thwart the drafting of a new constitution, the scenario Morsi had apparently been seeking to avert with his decree.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. told a federal appellate court that President Obama respects the Supreme Court's power to interpret the constitutionality of the nation's law, adding that the president's recent comments about the healthcare reform law were "fully consistent" with established judicial precedent. His three-page letter Thursday came after Judge Jerry E. Smith of the 5th U.S. Court of Appeals in New Orleans criticized Obama for comments that the judge said questioned whether the courts have the power to invalidate acts of Congress.
OPINION
April 23, 2010 | Vicki Divoll
According to media reports, the United States has taken the apparently unprecedented step of authorizing the "targeted killing" of one of its citizens outside a war zone — though the government has not officially acknowledged it. Unnamed intelligence and counter-terrorism sources told reporters that the Obama administration had added Anwar al Awlaki, a Muslim cleric born in New Mexico, to the CIA list of suspected terrorists who may be...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1995
The O.J. Simpson double murder trial. * The prison sentences for Laurence Powell and Stacey Koon, who were convicted of violating Rodney King's civil rights. * The lawsuit over the quake-flattened Northridge Meadows apartments, which ended with a $1-million-plus settlement. * The criminal case against Orange County Treasurer Robert L. Citron, who pleaded guilty to six felonies involving fraud and misappropriation of public money in connection with the county's declaration of bankruptcy in 1994.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | Associated Press
Israel's Supreme Court today criticized the army for overcrowded conditions at the Ketziot tent prison and for failing to expedite judicial review for 1,500 detainees jailed there without trial. But the three-judge panel rejected an appeal for release by 14 detainees, only five of whom are still held. The court upheld the army's right to imprison Palestinians from the occupied territories in Israel despite Geneva conventions against transferring prisoners across borders.
OPINION
November 24, 2008
Re "The courts and Prop. 8," editorial, Nov. 20 The editorial regarding Prop. 8 cautions, "but the legal system is designed to guard against the tyranny of the majority." What? Any tyranny rests in our convoluted legal system. If the will of the people means nothing, revolution cannot be far behind. The Times' editorialists have gone over the cliff this time around. Barry Cook La Quinta :: I always suspected that you only tolerated the democratic process as long as it furthered your causes.
OPINION
August 8, 2007 | David B. Rivkin Jr. and Lee A. Casey, David B. Rivkin Jr. and Lee A. Casey are partners in a Washington law firm and served in the Justice Department under presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush.
The ink is still wet on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act amendments, adopted by Congress in the final hours before its August recess, and already this six-month-long compromise legislation has drawn strident criticisms from civil libertarians, who believe that it has given the president too much power.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|