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Judicial System

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1998
As a citizen of Ventura County, I feel it is time for people to work together to help one another. If you feel you have been wronged by the judicial system in Simi Valley or Ventura, please let your voice be heard. Write to me in detail and I will do my best to secure a better future for our children. We are all protected under laws, which no one should ever be in a position to ignore. Ventura County organizations do not have the resources to make a change. But if we can get enough responses, we do. Please write to P.O. Box 1082, Fillmore CA 93015.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Can a piece of paper be a smoking gun? A decade ago, the state of Texas executed Cameron Todd Willingham after a trial in which an arson investigation and a jailhouse snitch named Johnny Webb seemed to prove Willingham had set a 1991 house fire, killing his three children. Yet even before the trial began, doubts surfaced about the veracity of the arson report, which ultimately was discredited as abjectly incompetent. As for the witness Webb, the prosecutor at the time, John Jackson, insisted he had made no deal in return for Webb's testimony, the kind of detail jurors need to know to weigh the veracity of a witness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By David Ng
Ai Weiwei lost his appeal in his high-profile tax case on Friday, prompting the artist to speak out yet again against the Chinese government. A court in Beijing upheld an approximately $2.4-million fine for tax evasion against the artist. The tax fine had been imposed against Ai's company, Beijing Fake Cultural Development. Supporters of the artist believe that the fine is an attempt by Chinese officials to penalize Ai for his online political activism and fight for free speech. Ai told reporters Friday that the Chinese legal system "still has no respect for the truth, still will never give taxpayers and citizens an ability to justify themselves.
OPINION
August 21, 2013
Re “ Some teeth for Coastal Commission? ” Aug. 19 This is a terrible idea. The reasoning for the Coastal Commission to be able to issue fines is because it takes too long for the judicial system to work. So if some official (who could be politically motivated) decides to fine you or me, and even if we think it is wrong, we are stuck. We are faced with a judicial system that does not work, a judicial system that takes too long. So fix that problem. The Legislature should be working to get our courts sufficiently staffed to handle legal issues in a timely manner.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Connoisseurs of salacious gossip about the rich and famous must have found themselves in pig heaven in June 2008, when federal prosecutors went after the billionaire Henry T. Nicholas III . The indictment charging that he was part of a huge stock option manipulation scheme at Broadcom Corp., the Irvine high-tech company he co-founded, was only the beginning. The lagniappe was a second indictment related to his personal lifestyle: allegations of his purchases of illegal drugs and his hiring of prostitutes on a heroic scale, his construction of an underground drug den, his consumption of marijuana in such volume that the pilot flying Nicholas and his entourage aboard a private jet to Las Vegas had to don an oxygen mask.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valley residents Tuesday gave Los Angeles County judges and court administrators their assessment of the shortcomings of the judicial system and their suggestions for improvements. A public forum at the San Fernando Courthouse brought together about 25 residents with an equal number of court officials to discuss issues ranging from jury reform to accountability. It was the second in a series of five such forums designed to help reduce public dissatisfaction with the judicial system.
NEWS
January 5, 1987 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
In her final public appearance as California chief justice, Rose Elizabeth Bird decried what she considers to be the public's limited understanding of the judicial system and took a swipe at Gov. George Deukmejian's proposed appointees to the state Supreme Court.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until Felicia Bell stood before him in court and looked him in the eye, Judge Arthur Jean had planned to send the looters back to jail. But there she was, his very first riot defendant, a frightened 18-year-old barely over 5 feet tall, dressed in a black suit jacket and heels, trying her best to look like an adult. Perched behind his judicial bench, Jean read through the letter Bell had written him, in which she never once asked for mercy but merely apologized "for my stupidity."
OPINION
January 21, 2010
Just weeks ago, Colombian human rights activist Principe Gabriel Gonzalez Arango was making the rounds in Washington -- meeting with senior State Department officials, testifying before Congress -- and being feted in New York for his work on behalf of political prisoners and the steep personal price he has paid for his advocacy. Now he is facing seven years in prison. Gonzalez, who had been providing inmates with educational and social services, was arrested in 2006 and charged with the standard smear against activists who are thorns in the government's side: being a member of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, a drug-trafficking terrorist group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2000 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If computer technology can change the way we buy dog food, why can't it make the legal system less intimidating? That's the idea behind a groundbreaking project spearheaded by the Legal Aid Society of Orange County and the Superior Court that will soon allow the public to access the courts through computer kiosks across the county.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama believes the civilian justice system can handle cases of domestic terrorism and supports the decision to try the Boston Marathon bombing suspect in federal court, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said Monday. “The effective use of the criminal justice system has resulted in the interrogation, conviction and detention of both U.S. citizens and noncitizens for acts of terrorism committed inside the United States and around the world,” Carney said.
WORLD
April 20, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Gen. Tomas Angeles Dauahare, who once held the plum post of military attache to the Mexican Embassy in Washington, was rumored to be the next defense minister of Mexico. Until that day in May last year when he and three other top military men were arrested on suspicion of working on behalf of a notorious drug cartel. It was the largest indictment of army officers on charges of drug-trafficking in recent memory, hailed in many quarters as proof of then-President Felipe Calderon's determination to root out corruption at every level.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
The exceptional documentary "Holy Man: The USA vs. Douglas White" tells the haunting tale of White, a Lakota Sioux medicine man from South Dakota's storied Pine Ridge Reservation who, at age 72, was imprisoned for the alleged sexual abuse of his two young grandsons. Years later, his grandsons, who were ensnared as children in a family custody feud, confessed to lying at White's trial. But White, whose case this film asserts symbolizes the racial bias Native Americans frequently face in the U.S. courts, remained incarcerated until 2009, when he died at 89 from lung cancer.
WORLD
August 9, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - AfterO.J. Simpson was acquitted of murder in 1995, a well-connected Chinese lawyer pointed to the case as proof of the failure of the American judicial system. "An American trial always gives bad people a chance to take advantage of the loopholes," the lawyer, Gu Kailai, wrote in a 1998 book about her experiences working in the United States. "The Chinese judicial system is fairest.... If you kill somebody, they'll arrest you, try you and shoot you. " On Thursday, Gu, the wife of former Politburo member Bo Xilai, was on the receiving end of Chinese justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By David Ng
Ai Weiwei lost his appeal in his high-profile tax case on Friday, prompting the artist to speak out yet again against the Chinese government. A court in Beijing upheld an approximately $2.4-million fine for tax evasion against the artist. The tax fine had been imposed against Ai's company, Beijing Fake Cultural Development. Supporters of the artist believe that the fine is an attempt by Chinese officials to penalize Ai for his online political activism and fight for free speech. Ai told reporters Friday that the Chinese legal system "still has no respect for the truth, still will never give taxpayers and citizens an ability to justify themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Barbarian Nurseries A Novel Héctor Tobar Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 422 pp., $27 "The Barbarian Nurseries" is a book of extraordinary scope and extraordinary power. Héctor Tobar's second novel sweeps its central character from almost-serfdom and sends her on an odyssey through the teeming mysteries of Los Angeles and the wild jungles of the California judicial system. The publishers compare it to Tom Wolfe's "The Bonfire of the Vanities. " That's right only up to a point, for Tobar's concern isn't satire but the possibilities of social inclusion and redemption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | ALAN J. PETERSON, Alan J. Peterson lives in Santa Paula
We all understand the constitutionally guaranteed right to a trial by our peers. However, the ballooning of the judicial system, brought on largely by the "lottery" attitude toward personal-injury lawsuits and the drug industry, is out of hand and desperately in need of overhaul. The Times missed that point in its article, "Tough Rules for Jury Duty Try Patience of Residents," May 28. Recently I wasted a full day serving my "civic duty" along with 150 more silent lambs in the jury assembly room.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Newt Gingrich does not like judges. That's the message the former House speaker sent to attendees at the Values Voter Summit on Friday afternoon. Gingrich delivered his speech after three other Republican presidential candidates - former Sen. Rick Santorum, Texas Gov. Rick Perry and retired pizza chain executive Herman Cain - made their pitch to the gathering of social conservatives. Gingrich's performance, however, felt more like a law school lecture than an appeal for the nomination.
OPINION
April 18, 2011
Over the last two weeks, Mexican authorities in the northern state of Tamaulipas have unearthed more than 140 bodies. Many are believed to be the remains of passengers kidnapped from long-distance buses. The gruesome discoveries are just the latest reminder of the bloodshed that has overtaken some parts of Mexico. President Felipe Calderon has responded by dispatching troops to the area to patrol the highways where migrants are often targeted by criminal gangs that operate with impunity.
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