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OPINION
March 15, 2013
Re "A lament in a history lesson," March 12 California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye could also have given a brief accounting lesson on the effect of imprisoning people who have inadequate legal representation. For every prisoner incarcerated, it costs taxpayers about $50,000 per year. Illustrating the importance of a properly funded judiciary, Cantil-Sakauye tells the story of Clarence Gideon, the Floridian whose wrongful conviction in 1961 and five years in prison resulted in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Gideon vs. Wainwright.
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NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Sen. Elizabeth Warren's populist crusade has a new objective: preventing “a corporate capture of the federal courts.” The Massachusetts Democrat and progressive heroine graciously concedes that “there are some really talented judges who came from the private sector.” But she insists that “it matters that someone has represented people other than corporate clients, that they've had real experience with people who can't afford lawyers, that...
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NEWS
May 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Condemned murderer Marvin Francois died in the electric chair Wednesday, blaming a "racist" judicial system. "The white Miami institutionalized racist judiciary and law enforcement systems have made me, the once heroin addict, the scapegoat," Francois said. Francois, 39, who was denied a reprieve late Tuesday by the Supreme Court, was sentenced to die for murdering six persons in a drug-related robbery in July, 1977.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) recommended Tuesday that Sen. Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa) be replaced as chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and observers say it appears part of a political squabble between the two over the race for Evans' district. Steinberg's recommendation that Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) replace Evans as chairwoman will be considered Wednesday by the Senate Rules Committee, of which Steinberg is chairman, according to the agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1999
The House Judiciary Committee and Microsoft must have the same coaching staff. Bungling offense, inept defense. PAUL H. WANGSNESS Burbank
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Iranian President Mohammad Khatami has issued a rare warning to the hard-line judiciary to stop prosecuting reformist members of parliament, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported. Hard-line courts regularly summon outspoken reformist parliamentarians and have sentenced at least three to prison. "It is part of [the members of parliament's] duties to freely express their opinions, and they must be immune from prosecution," Khatami said in a letter to the judiciary chief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1986
The continuing debate over whether or not candidates for political office should or should not endorse or oppose Rose Elizabeth Bird in her bid for reconfirmation to the Supreme Court demonstrates a woeful ignorance of, and disregard for, the cornerstone of our particular brand of democracy. The strength of our democracy lies in the strength of our Constitution and the separation of powers enunciated therein, calling for an independent executive, legislature, and judiciary. And the most important of these is the independent judiciary.
OPINION
October 26, 1986
Your editorial states that the judiciary is the stabilizing force in the American system of government. In America, maybe. In California, hardly. If our judiciary were a stabilizing force, there would be no turmoil in this election. The Times further states, "the courts are not so easily swayed"--right on point. Rose Bird (59 for 59 death penalty reversals) supports this point 100%. But the really galling statement to California voters is where The Times implies that the California Supreme Court is, "the true conservative branch of government . . . that prevents the majority from trampling on the minority."
WORLD
March 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Iran's judiciary ended proceedings against the country's top academic dissident, a man who faced the death penalty for telling Iranians not to follow their ruling clerics "like monkeys," his lawyer said. Hashem Aghajari last July was freed on bail from two years' imprisonment, after winning two appeals against hanging. However, he still had to appeal against a remaining charge of insulting Islamic values.
OPINION
August 13, 2010 | By Tim Wildmon
The people of California spoke clearly at the polls in 2008 when they passed an amendment to the state Constitution that defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman. The public debate was held, the media wars were fought, both sides spent millions of dollars and the people voted for Proposition 8 by a margin of 52% to 48%. The people's will carried the day, as it is supposed to — until U.S. District Chief Judge Vaughn R. Walker came along. Last week, Walker nullified the votes of 7,001,084 people.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Journalists and bloggers who report news to the public will be protected from being forced to testify about their work under a media shield bill passed by a Senate committee Thursday. But the new legal protections will not extend to the controversial online website Wikileaks and others whose principal work involves disclosing "primary-source documents … without authorization. " Senate sponsors of the bill and a coalition of media groups that support it hailed Thursday's bipartisan Senate Judiciary Committee vote as a breakthrough.
NATIONAL
July 17, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - The Voting Rights Act, the landmark 1965 legislation that protects against racially discriminatory voting practices, had long received overwhelming bipartisan support in Congress, including for the last renewal of its temporary provisions in 2006. But at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday, early discussions on how to respond to the Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down Section 4 of the law saw Democrats and Republicans mostly divided over the provision's utility and future.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A sweeping bipartisan plan to overhaul the nation's immigration system headed to the Senate floor after a key committee approved it Tuesday, setting the stage for a debate next month that could lead to the biggest victory for advocates of immigrant rights in a generation. The centerpiece of the legislation - a 13-year path to citizenship for many of the 11 million people now in the country without legal status - survived intact. But the bill's supporters accepted amendments that tilted it to the right to attract GOP backing, including some to toughen border security.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
The Senate Judiciary Committee amended the sweeping immigration bill Tuesday to tighten student visa rules in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings. The committee, which is trying to get through the 844-page bill by the end of the week, also fended off changes that threatened to derail the delicate compromise reached by a bipartisan group of eight senators who drafted the legislation. The lengthy meeting of the committee unfolded as a core group of House Republicans turned up the volume against the immigration overhaul.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - On the third day of hearings on a bill to overhaul the immigration system, senators took a break from partisan sniping and grilled Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano on whether the Boston bombings had exposed shortcomings in the nation's immigration security apparatus. Conservative Republicans have tried to slow the Senate bill since two brothers, ethnic Chechens granted political asylum from Russia as minors with their family, were identified as the suspects in last week's bombings.
OPINION
March 15, 2013
Re "A lament in a history lesson," March 12 California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye could also have given a brief accounting lesson on the effect of imprisoning people who have inadequate legal representation. For every prisoner incarcerated, it costs taxpayers about $50,000 per year. Illustrating the importance of a properly funded judiciary, Cantil-Sakauye tells the story of Clarence Gideon, the Floridian whose wrongful conviction in 1961 and five years in prison resulted in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Gideon vs. Wainwright.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1986
As a seeker of truth and justice, and as a student of the media, I must hereby assert myself to protest the abuse of the term "independence" by the judiciary and the media. Warren Christopher in his article (Editorial Pages, Sept. 23), "Justice Grodin's Fair-Weather Friend," uses the terms "independent judiciary," "judicial independence," and the word independence several times in his defense of the Gang of Three. Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird uses these same terms and ideas constantly in her defensive campaign.
OPINION
January 11, 1987
May I please request that the approval for increases in Social Security benefits be transferred to the federal commission that is recommending increases in salary for the Congress, White House personnel and members of the judiciary. The increase on my Social Security check, just received, was $5 a month, or $60 a year--quite a difference between 75%, or $75,000 per year, which is being proposed for the above-mentioned Washington "dignitaries." The automatic increase of $5 in my Social Security benefit was described as "based on the rise in the cost of living."
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Melanie Mason
WASHINGTON - The Senate Judiciary Committee approved a bill Thursday to combat gun trafficking, the first firearms measure since the Newtown, Conn., shooting to move to consideration by the full Senate. The proposal, steered by committee chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), defines and imposes strict penalties for so-called straw purchasing, the act of buying a firearm for someone who cannot legally buy one themselves. The bill would also toughen punishment for selling weapons to a prohibited person.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2013 | By Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - "Speaking is difficult, but I need to say something important," former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords told her onetime colleagues. "Violence is a big problem. Too many children are dying. Too many children. We must do something. "It would be hard, but the time is now. You must act. " Her words, read from a single, handwritten page, were among the camera-ready scenes as the Senate began hearings on gun control Wednesday, in a charged atmosphere with each side reaching for emotional force.
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