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Judith Anderson

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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dame Judith Anderson, the Australian-born actress who stalked the world's stages and films in potent portrayals of complex and tormented women, died Friday. The quintessential Medea, Lady Macbeth and the obsessively deranged Mrs. Danvers of "Rebecca" was 93. She died at home, said Patricia Cartin of Welch, Ryce Haider mortuary. In August, she spent 18 days in a hospital for an undisclosed ailment. No cause of death was disclosed.
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SPORTS
December 3, 1996 | LON EUBANKS
Two NCAA investigators arrived on the Cal State Fullerton campus Monday in connection with the NCAA's preliminary inquiry into the school's athletic program. "They've begun their work on campus, and will be interviewing several people," said Judith Anderson, executive assistant to university President Milton Gordon. Anderson said university officials and the NCAA investigators have agreed to not comment further.
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SPORTS
December 3, 1996 | LON EUBANKS
Two NCAA investigators arrived on the Cal State Fullerton campus Monday in connection with the NCAA's preliminary inquiry into the school's athletic program. "They've begun their work on campus, and will be interviewing several people," said Judith Anderson, executive assistant to university President Milton Gordon. Anderson said university officials and the NCAA investigators have agreed to not comment further.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1992 | JAMES PRIDEAUX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Playwright James Prideaux was a friend of Dame Judith Anderson. She died Friday at her Montecito home, after a long illness. Prideaux is the author of several Broadway plays, including "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln." He also wrote "Bread," which starred Anderson in her last television appearance
"Come by tomorrow," said the still-beautiful voice of Dame Judith Anderson, "and have a drink." When I arrived at the house that August day it was closed and dark. There wasn't a sound from within except for the wild yapping of Bozo, her beloved dachshund. On the front door was pinned a note: WE'VE TAKEN HER TO ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL. I went immediately. She was still in the emergency room. I was told that she had had a stroke. Yes, I could see her, but wait--was I a relative? I lied glibly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1992 | JAMES PRIDEAUX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Playwright James Prideaux was a friend of Dame Judith Anderson. She died Friday at her Montecito home, after a long illness. Prideaux is the author of several Broadway plays, including "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln." He also wrote "Bread," which starred Anderson in her last television appearance
"Come by tomorrow," said the still-beautiful voice of Dame Judith Anderson, "and have a drink." When I arrived at the house that August day it was closed and dark. There wasn't a sound from within except for the wild yapping of Bozo, her beloved dachshund. On the front door was pinned a note: WE'VE TAKEN HER TO ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL. I went immediately. She was still in the emergency room. I was told that she had had a stroke. Yes, I could see her, but wait--was I a relative? I lied glibly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Theater great Dame Judith Anderson returns to the stage--briefly--for "Poems of a Silent Man," a one-night recitation of the works of Robinson Jeffers, tonight at the Alhecama in Santa Barbara. The actress will be introduced by Robert Mitchum; proceeds go to the city's Ensemble Theatre Company. "I don't know why (Jeffers) is unknown," Anderson said regretfully. "He's a great, great poet--way before his time."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
It's only seven little letters, with a hyphen thrown in just for the heck of it, but to people in the know, the phrase "pre-Code" signifies cinematic buried treasure of the most satisfying kind. They're a sign of the secret life of American films, of a time after sound fully arrived in 1930 but before the enforcement of the moralistic Production Code in 1934.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again." --From "Rebecca" by Daphne du Maurier PBS goes to Manderley again Sunday night, and the result is a near masterpiece of escapism, a gorgeously mounted, triumphant new two-part "Rebecca" that validates the remaking of at least some movie classics. First some bad news.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When David Stollery's old pal Tim Considine called to ask if he'd like to appear with him at a Holly wood memorabilia collectors show to sign autographs last fall, Stollery agreed it sounded like fun. But he wondered: "Is anyone going to remember us?" Stollery, a Laguna Beach resident, needn't have worried. No one who grew up watching television in the 1950s could forget Considine and Stollery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Oodles of Doodles: The doodles of more than 100 celebrities will be auctioned Saturday at the Lobero Theatre in Santa Barbara, with proceeds earmarked for "urgently needed" renovation of the edifice. Items from the estate of Dame Judith Anderson will also go on the block. The event begins with a cocktail buffet and silent auction preview at 5:30 p.m.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dame Judith Anderson, the Australian-born actress who stalked the world's stages and films in potent portrayals of complex and tormented women, died Friday. The quintessential Medea, Lady Macbeth and the obsessively deranged Mrs. Danvers of "Rebecca" was 93. She died at home, said Patricia Cartin of Welch, Ryce Haider mortuary. In August, she spent 18 days in a hospital for an undisclosed ailment. No cause of death was disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Theater great Dame Judith Anderson returns to the stage--briefly--for "Poems of a Silent Man," a one-night recitation of the works of Robinson Jeffers, tonight at the Alhecama in Santa Barbara. The actress will be introduced by Robert Mitchum; proceeds go to the city's Ensemble Theatre Company. "I don't know why (Jeffers) is unknown," Anderson said regretfully. "He's a great, great poet--way before his time."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Dame Judith Anderson Honored: Dame Judith Anderson, now 92 and living in Santa Barbara, was honored Wednesday night at the first acting awards competition held by UCLA's School of Theater, Film and Television. In her native Adelaide, Australia, Dame Judith told the audience, she'd had no interest in studies at all. "I was the dumbest girl, not only in my class but the whole school. All I wanted to do was show off, which I did."
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