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Judith Baca

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April 5, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Historically, artists have been thought of as the visionaries," says Judith F. Baca, a leading Chicana artist whose vision has created such monumental results as the half-mile-long "Great Wall of Los Angeles" mural painted along the Tujunga Wash during the past 10 years by Baca and hundreds of teens.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, Agustin Gurza is a Times staff writer
Judith F. Baca steps close enough to feel the massive mural she calls "Triumph of the Hearts," a 10-by-30-foot canvas rendered in colors as vivid as her red shoes and matching shirt. The tips of her fingers delicately rub the surface of the canvas, which is being treated for mold damage. "Touch it," invites Baca, L.A.'s pioneering Latina muralist, relishing the sheer sensuality of her large-scale medium. "Feel the stiffness of this section. It's hard to imagine it's living fiber."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural in Valley Glen that chronicles the history of Los Angeles, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading canvas while seeking another $1 million to finish the timeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural in Valley Glen that chronicles the history of Los Angeles, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading canvas while seeking another $1 million to finish the timeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people painted flowers on the rubble left from the 1992 riots. Artist Judith Baca felt the gesture did not go far enough. A specialist in "public art," Baca felt the need for a more culturally focused kind of expression, one that would promote healing and understanding between the splintered communities of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural chronicling the city's history, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading cultural canvas while seeking $1 million more to finish the timeline.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
As artist Judith Baca sees it, the resurrection of a city-financed mural program could mean nothing less than a "mural renaissance" for Los Angeles. Baca and other organizers of the $250,000 Neighborhood Pride: Great Walls Unlimited Program, revived when Mayor Tom Bradley signed the city budget July 1, plan to produce nine murals by next summer, employing young people to assist professional artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people painted flowers on the rubble left from the 1992 riots. Artist Judith Baca felt the gesture did not go far enough. A specialist in "public art," Baca felt the need for a more culturally focused kind of expression, one that would promote healing and understanding between the splintered communities of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much like the struggles and hardships depicted on a mural spanning half a mile in the Tujunga Wash flood control channel, an organization of artists that spent seven years painting the expansive "Great Wall of Los Angeles" is entrenched in its own battle. Faced with watching their work peel, crack and fade, the artists must find funding to restore the weather-beaten mural or possibly lose what many consider a cultural landmark.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1997 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two altars, aglow with the light of colorful votives and strewn with flowers and mementos, face each other across a tiny room. The room is one where police used to book prisoners, back when this 1929 Art Deco building housed the Venice jail. These days, however, it is the home of the Social and Public Art Resource Center, also known as SPARC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of a half-mile-long mural chronicling the city's history, particularly struggles by ethnic groups, remains in financial limbo. Supporters have begun raising $500,000 to restore the fading cultural canvas while seeking $1 million more to finish the timeline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | GREG RISLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much like the struggles and hardships depicted on a mural spanning half a mile in the Tujunga Wash flood control channel, an organization of artists that spent seven years painting the expansive "Great Wall of Los Angeles" is entrenched in its own battle. Faced with watching their work peel, crack and fade, the artists must find funding to restore the weather-beaten mural or possibly lose what many consider a cultural landmark.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1997 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two altars, aglow with the light of colorful votives and strewn with flowers and mementos, face each other across a tiny room. The room is one where police used to book prisoners, back when this 1929 Art Deco building housed the Venice jail. These days, however, it is the home of the Social and Public Art Resource Center, also known as SPARC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people painted flowers on the rubble left from the 1992 riots. Artist Judith Baca felt the gesture did not go far enough. A specialist in "public art," Baca felt the need for a more culturally focused kind of expression, one that would promote healing and understanding between the splintered communities of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996 | MAKI BECKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people painted flowers on the rubble left from the 1992 riots. Artist Judith Baca felt the gesture did not go far enough. A specialist in "public art," Baca felt the need for a more culturally focused kind of expression, one that would promote healing and understanding between the splintered communities of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Historically, artists have been thought of as the visionaries," says Judith F. Baca, a leading Chicana artist whose vision has created such monumental results as the half-mile-long "Great Wall of Los Angeles" mural painted along the Tujunga Wash during the past 10 years by Baca and hundreds of teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, Agustin Gurza is a Times staff writer
Judith F. Baca steps close enough to feel the massive mural she calls "Triumph of the Hearts," a 10-by-30-foot canvas rendered in colors as vivid as her red shoes and matching shirt. The tips of her fingers delicately rub the surface of the canvas, which is being treated for mold damage. "Touch it," invites Baca, L.A.'s pioneering Latina muralist, relishing the sheer sensuality of her large-scale medium. "Feel the stiffness of this section. It's hard to imagine it's living fiber."
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
As artist Judith Baca sees it, the resurrection of a city-financed mural program could mean nothing less than a "mural renaissance" for Los Angeles. Baca and other organizers of the $250,000 Neighborhood Pride: Great Walls Unlimited Program, revived when Mayor Tom Bradley signed the city budget July 1, plan to produce nine murals by next summer, employing young people to assist professional artists.
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