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Judith Freeman

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October 27, 1991 | Jay Parini, Parini, a poet and novelist, teaches at Middlebury College in Vermont. His most recent novel is "The Last Station." "Bay of Arrows," his fourth novel, will be published next summer
Judith Freeman attracted considerable attention with her two previous books, "Family Attractions"--a volume of stories--and "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel. What was obvious in both was Freeman's remarkable clarity in portraying characters and her luminous, often lyrical, prose. These gifts are confirmed in her second novel, "Set for Life," which is starkly beautiful and focused with an almost laser-like intensity on her two protagonists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
At the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Sunday, I got a chance to sit down with novelist and nonfiction writer Judith Freeman to discuss the lure of Southern California as a literary landscape, and also the influence of Raymond Chandler on the city and its cultural life. "When I moved here, one of the first writers that I started to read, through a friend of mine, was Raymond Chandler. And I thought, Wow, that's Los Angeles," Freeman said. "And I still think that he really got the city, he got underneath the city, he got everything about the city.
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BOOKS
February 14, 1988 | Merrill Joan Gerber, Gerber has published stories in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Sewanee Review, as well as in "Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards 1986." Her most recent collection is "Honeymoon" (University of Illinois Press)
In her first published collection of short stories, "Family Attractions," Judith Freeman tells her tales in passionate voices strong with the authority of deeply felt experience, folk wisdom, and close observation of life. The most important and affecting stories in the book are the final two, both about a young Mormon woman from Utah whose overwhelming responsibility in life is to care for her sick son.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Mitt Romney owes Judith Freeman money if you follow their genealogies back a few generations, to the time of the Mormon settlement of the West, she says. Freeman is the author of the biography "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved" and three novels; Romney is expected to be nominated by Republican delegates at the convention this week as their candidate for president. The financial connection was between Romney's great-grandfather Miles P. Romney and Freeman's great-grandfather William Jordan Flake.
BOOKS
November 19, 1989 | Barbara Kingsolver, Kingsolver is the author of two books of fiction and, most recently, "Holding the Line: Women in the Great Arizona Mine Strike of 1983" (ILR Press)
When I married, years ago in a foreign city, the ceremony was conducted hastily in a language I barely understood. The circumstances were admittedly odd but also appropriate, I thought. Contrary to all the romantic literature on the subject, marriage seems finally to be an almost absurd act of faith; we have no idea what we are promising.
BOOKS
June 9, 1996 | Julia Cameron, Julia Cameron is the author of "The Artist's Way." The focus of her current work is music- and sound-healing
Judith Freeman's novel, "A Desert of Pure Feeling," is aptly named. It is a book about people who lack the courage of their convictions--and evictions--and subsequently break their own hearts. Freeman is a fine writer but on this book her ear wobbles in and out of focus as if she is sometimes listening to her own true voice and at other times listening to erroneous advice from others: "Add a dialogue bridge here. They won't get it otherwise."
BOOKS
March 3, 1991
Judith Freeman failed her critical duty in her review of "Home Free." For comparison, she invoked John Steinbeck, when her first obligation should have been to evaluate the author's own intentions, then make a judgment as to style, characters, the place and time of the novel. I think what caught Hailey's attention was the notion that an upper-middle-class woman with pains of her own was suddenly alerted to a problem we all hear and talk about, but as individuals do very little to cure.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2009 | Judith Freeman, Freeman is the author of several novels, including "Red Water," as well as "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved."
The number of people who actually knew Raymond Chandler and who are still alive can pretty much be counted on one hand. Chandler died 50 years ago last week, on March 26, 1959, at the age of 70. Among his surviving friends are Natasha Spender, wife of the late poet Stephen Spender (now in her 90s), and the writer Neil Morgan, who, as a young journalist at the San Diego Tribune, met the writer.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Mitt Romney owes Judith Freeman money if you follow their genealogies back a few generations, to the time of the Mormon settlement of the West, she says. Freeman is the author of the biography "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved" and three novels; Romney is expected to be nominated by Republican delegates at the convention this week as their candidate for president. The financial connection was between Romney's great-grandfather Miles P. Romney and Freeman's great-grandfather William Jordan Flake.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2007 | Graham Fuller, Special to The Times
Twenty years ago, Judith Freeman became "obsessed," as she puts it, with Raymond Chandler, whose novels featuring the private detective Philip Marlowe still make up the most iconic literary portrait of Los Angeles. When, in 2003, Freeman began writing "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved," she found herself on a quest leading in many different directions. The author of a short-story collection and four novels, Freeman was raised in Utah.
BOOKS
November 4, 2007 | Richard Rayner, Richard Rayner's new book, "The Associates: Four Capitalists Who Created California," is due out in January. His column Paperback Writers appears monthly at latimes.com/books.
"I used to like this town. A long time ago. There were trees along Wilshire Boulevard. Beverly Hills was a country town. Westwood was bare hills and lots offering at eleven hundred dollars and no takers. Hollywood was a bunch of frame houses on the inter-urban line," Raymond Chandler wrote, in the voice of his detective hero, Philip Marlowe, in 1949. "Los Angeles was just a big dry sunny place with ugly homes and no style, but good-hearted and peaceful. It had the climate they yap about now.
BOOKS
January 27, 2002 | JANET FITCH
It must be every bride's nightmare--going home to meet your new husband's seven other wives. But in Judith Freeman's fourth novel, "Red Water," set in the Mormon West of the 1850s and '60s, it's only to be expected. Emma Batchelor, English emigre and convert, marries the charismatic John D. Lee, a real-life leader in the early church, and moves to a remote settlement in the red lands of the Great Basin in this tale of the sweat- and blood-soaked West.
NEWS
January 22, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Red Water," Judith Freeman's latest novel, is nothing less than the story of a haunting--families, meadows, an entire religious community haunted by a massacre. Questions about faith, fundamentalism, passion, perseverance, humility and justice sneak up out of the southwestern landscape and from the smallest movements of the characters. In 1857, a wagon train of migrants from Arkansas crossed Utah. Gentiles, as they were called by the Mormons whose territory they were crossing.
HEALTH
January 18, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
Paulson, of USC, is not only a leading authority on egg donation, he has treated the oldest mother in the world (a 63-year-old who gave birth in 1996). This book describes the process of pursuing motherhood well after natural fertility has diminished with age. Paulson starts out by honoring the concept that motherhood is a natural desire that should not be denied, even to women in menopause. From there, he and coauthor Sachs describe an actual patient's experiences undergoing treatment.
BOOKS
June 9, 1996 | Julia Cameron, Julia Cameron is the author of "The Artist's Way." The focus of her current work is music- and sound-healing
Judith Freeman's novel, "A Desert of Pure Feeling," is aptly named. It is a book about people who lack the courage of their convictions--and evictions--and subsequently break their own hearts. Freeman is a fine writer but on this book her ear wobbles in and out of focus as if she is sometimes listening to her own true voice and at other times listening to erroneous advice from others: "Add a dialogue bridge here. They won't get it otherwise."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2007 | Graham Fuller, Special to The Times
Twenty years ago, Judith Freeman became "obsessed," as she puts it, with Raymond Chandler, whose novels featuring the private detective Philip Marlowe still make up the most iconic literary portrait of Los Angeles. When, in 2003, Freeman began writing "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved," she found herself on a quest leading in many different directions. The author of a short-story collection and four novels, Freeman was raised in Utah.
BOOKS
October 27, 1991 | Jay Parini, Parini, a poet and novelist, teaches at Middlebury College in Vermont. His most recent novel is "The Last Station." "Bay of Arrows," his fourth novel, will be published next summer
Judith Freeman attracted considerable attention with her two previous books, "Family Attractions"--a volume of stories--and "The Chinchilla Farm," a novel. What was obvious in both was Freeman's remarkable clarity in portraying characters and her luminous, often lyrical, prose. These gifts are confirmed in her second novel, "Set for Life," which is starkly beautiful and focused with an almost laser-like intensity on her two protagonists.
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