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Judith Grossman

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February 7, 1988 | Carolyn See
This is a story bound to be incomprehensible to some; unbearably familiar to others. "Her Own Terms" is set in England, in the '50s. Irene, a scholarship undergraduate at a women's college at Oxford, is in the quintessential '50s female fix: She's pregnant; All the gin and quinine and running up and down stairs she can manage have had no effect whatsoever on her condition--she's going to have to find an (illegal, of course) abortionist.
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May 19, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long search for a writer to fill the second faculty teaching position in UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing has ended. English-born novelist Judith Grossman has accepted the post and will begin teaching graduate and undergraduate creative writing in the 1993 winter quarter. Grossman, author of the critically acclaimed 1988 novel "Her Own Terms," has more than 25 years of experience teaching writing.
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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long search for a writer to fill the second faculty teaching position in UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing has ended. English-born novelist Judith Grossman has accepted the post and will begin teaching graduate and undergraduate creative writing in the 1993 winter quarter. Grossman, author of the critically acclaimed 1988 novel "Her Own Terms," has more than 25 years of experience teaching writing.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lengthy search for a writer to fill the second faculty teaching position in UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing has finally ended. English-born novelist Judith Grossman has accepted the post and will begin teaching graduate and undergraduate creative writing in the 1993 winter quarter. Grossman, author of the critically acclaimed 1988 novel "Her Own Terms," has more than 25 years of experience teaching writing.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lengthy search for a writer to fill the second faculty teaching position in UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing has finally ended. English-born novelist Judith Grossman has accepted the post and will begin teaching graduate and undergraduate creative writing in the 1993 winter quarter. Grossman, author of the critically acclaimed 1988 novel "Her Own Terms," has more than 25 years of experience teaching writing.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judith Grossman, the London-born novelist who recently joined the faculty of UC Irvine's nationally acclaimed graduate Program in Writing, will lecture on women as storytellers at 8 p.m. today in Crystal Cove Auditorium in the UCI Student Center. General admission: $6. Tickets may be purchased at the door.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michelle Latiolais, a 1988 graduate of UC Irvine's graduate program in writing--the only student in the program's history to earn a master's in both poetry and fiction--has joined the school as a full-time faculty member. Latiolais, 41, will lead the spring writing workshop for the dozen fiction writers in the program in addition to teaching an advanced undergraduate writing workshop and a contemporary-literature class on the stylistic use of violence.
NEWS
January 31, 1994
Calling it the world's "most extreme case of race hate" author Thomas Keneally spoke of the Holocaust at a recent gala dinner on behalf of UC Irvine's Program in Writing. "This was the case in which the organs of a government were devoted to producing death of a minority as an industrial product. This was as far as you can go in race hate--the furthest track of the line," said the author of "Schindler's List." Not your everyday gala topic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2009 | Ed Park, Park is the author of the novel "Personal Days." His "Astral Weeks" column appears monthly at latimes.com/books.
"There's a special gut-check moment the first time you write a scene in which somebody casts a spell," says novelist and Time book critic Lev Grossman, over drinks at a hotel bar in the Time Warner Building. "I remember ['Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell' author] Susanna Clarke telling me about the first time she wrote a scene with a fairy in it and saying to herself, 'Am I really writing a book with a fairy in it?' It's definitely a naked-lunch moment where you're going through the portal and declaring yourself as a fantasy novelist."
NEWS
December 17, 1995
For someone undergoing her baptism of fire, Aimee Bender doesn't look nervous. The weekly graduate fiction writing workshop at UC Irvine is in progress, and Bender, a 26-year-old first-year grad student from San Francisco, is having one of her short stories critiqued for the first time. Bender listens intently as her 11 fellow writers, seated at two pushed-together conference tables, take turns holding forth in a sort of literary round robin: The combination of "being plain and somewhat fanciful in style" works well, says one. The transition of one character seemed too abrupt, says another.
BOOKS
February 14, 1988
Irene, winning a state scholarship to Oxford, leaves the oppressed world of women and the underclass for the equally terrible, oppressing world of men and the upper class.--Carolyn See RACHEL AND HER CHILDREN Homeless Families in America by Jonathan Kozol (Crown Publishers: $16.95; 261 pp.) Kozol attacks attitudes and policies that perpetuate homelessness and allows the monologues of women, men and children to speak their desperation and helplessness.--Garry Abrams
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For someone undergoing her baptism of fire, Aimee Bender doesn't look nervous. The weekly graduate fiction writing workshop at UC Irvine is in progress, and Bender, a 26-year-old from San Francisco, is having one of her short stories critiqued for the first time. She listens intently as 11 fellow writers, seated at pushed-together conference tables, take turns holding forth in a sort of literary round robin: The combination of "being plain and somewhat fanciful in style" works well, says one.
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