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Judith Howarth

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March 10, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some singers can't wait to find their vocal niche. British soprano Judith Howarth has been looking for 20 years and is content to continue waiting to spot hers. "My voice still seems to be developing," said Howarth, 36 and one of four vocal soloists with the Royal Opera Orchestra of Covent Garden, which makes its North American debut tonight in Costa Mesa. "I feel I still haven't really fallen into a fach [vocal category] I'm going to settle in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some singers can't wait to find their vocal niche. British soprano Judith Howarth has been looking for 20 years and is content to continue waiting to spot hers. "My voice still seems to be developing," said Howarth, 36 and one of four vocal soloists with the Royal Opera Orchestra of Covent Garden, which makes its North American debut tonight in Costa Mesa. "I feel I still haven't really fallen into a fach [vocal category] I'm going to settle in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1999
The identities of the sopranos are switched in Mark Swed's March 12 review of the Royal Opera Orchestra. It was Rita Cullis, not Judith Howarth, who performed excerpts from Wagner's "Tannhauser." Likewise, it was Howarth, not Cullis, who sang excerpts from "La Traviata" and "La Boheme." ROBIN DEEMER, Huntington Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Royal Opera was once a great company and will undoubtedly become one again. But for the moment it is in a sorry state. Anyone who has spent time in its cramped but elegant opera house in London's fashionable Covent Garden will surely have valuable memories. One of mine is a performance of Strauss' "Elektra," about 25 years ago, that Carlos Kleiber conducted.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
Mendelssohn's incidental music--parts of it, at any rate--to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is among the handful of works of its kind to have achieved popularity in the concert hall. The brief list of others would certainly include Grieg's "Peer Gynt" and Bizet's "L'Arlesienne." All three are, coincidentally, available in new recordings, not of the familiar concert suites but of the complete scores.
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