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Judith Ivey

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By David Rooney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— The last time Judith Ivey played a Tennessee Williams role was opposite Karl Malden. As introductions to playwrights go, it's hard to imagine many more authoritative guides than a man who had famously shared the stage with Jessica Tandy, Marlon Brando and Kim Hunter in Elia Kazan's 1947 premiere of "A Streetcar Named Desire. " Ivey's encounter with Malden was roughly 40 years ago, while she was studying acting at Illinois State University. The play was "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
"The Heiress," Ruth and Augustus Goetz's oft-revived 1947 stage adaptation of "Washington Square," Henry James' novel of 1850s New York, is back again -- Thursday was opening night for the latest of the tale of misplaced love, coveted property and a plain, diffident heroine who learns to bare her fangs. Jessica Chastain's profile has shot up via recent film roles, including "The Tree of Life," "Take Shelter" and "The Help"  She made her Broadway debut as Catherine Sloper, the mousy heiress who's caught between an insincere suitor (Dan Stevens of "Downton Abbey")
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"I don't have to deal with typecasting," declared esteemed character actress Judith Ivey. "I've avoided that by proving myself capable of portraying a wide variety of characters. Consequently, there aren't really any types of parts that I yearn to play but can't get cast in, and I'm very happy with my career."
NEWS
September 7, 2010
Judith Ivey: An article in Sunday's Calendar section about actress Judith Ivey's taking on the role of Amanda Wingfield in "The Glass Menagerie" said that she'd appeared in Neil Dunn's play "Steaming. " The playwright's first name is Nell. Westlake shooting: An article in Monday's LATExtra section about a fatal police shooting in Westlake misspelled the last name of LAPD Cmdr. Blake Chow as Chou.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1988 | RODERICK MANN
Anyone wondering why it is that Judith Ivey lives in New York rather than out here should spend 10 minutes reading her theater notices. They are the kind guaranteed to make even the most spoiled actress dash off thank-you notes and send baskets of flowers. They're so glowing and adulatory that you suspect the reviewers must all be near relatives.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judith Ivey has always been the bridesmaid, never the bride. Not that she hasn't had ample opportunities at stardom. The Texas-native has two Tony Awards for her supporting roles in "Steaming" and "Hurlyburly" and garnered crackerjack reviews for her supporting performances in such films as "Compromising Positions," "Hello Again" and "In Country." But those films didn't burn up the box office. "People don't read movie reviews," said Ivey.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
Judith Ivey: An article in Sunday's Calendar section about actress Judith Ivey's taking on the role of Amanda Wingfield in "The Glass Menagerie" said that she'd appeared in Neil Dunn's play "Steaming. " The playwright's first name is Nell. Westlake shooting: An article in Monday's LATExtra section about a fatal police shooting in Westlake misspelled the last name of LAPD Cmdr. Blake Chow as Chou.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Designs on Ivey: It's official. Actress Judith Ivey, winner of two Tony Awards, will join the cast of CBS' comedy series "Designing Women," said co-executive producer Linda Bloodworth-Thomason. Next season, Ivey will play a Texas widow who inherits her husband's fortune and moves to Atlanta. She replaces actress Julia Duffy, whose contract wasn't renewed after one season on the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
"The Heiress," Ruth and Augustus Goetz's oft-revived 1947 stage adaptation of "Washington Square," Henry James' novel of 1850s New York, is back again -- Thursday was opening night for the latest of the tale of misplaced love, coveted property and a plain, diffident heroine who learns to bare her fangs. Jessica Chastain's profile has shot up via recent film roles, including "The Tree of Life," "Take Shelter" and "The Help"  She made her Broadway debut as Catherine Sloper, the mousy heiress who's caught between an insincere suitor (Dan Stevens of "Downton Abbey")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By David Rooney, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— The last time Judith Ivey played a Tennessee Williams role was opposite Karl Malden. As introductions to playwrights go, it's hard to imagine many more authoritative guides than a man who had famously shared the stage with Jessica Tandy, Marlon Brando and Kim Hunter in Elia Kazan's 1947 premiere of "A Streetcar Named Desire. " Ivey's encounter with Malden was roughly 40 years ago, while she was studying acting at Illinois State University. The play was "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Designs on Ivey: It's official. Actress Judith Ivey, winner of two Tony Awards, will join the cast of CBS' comedy series "Designing Women," said co-executive producer Linda Bloodworth-Thomason. Next season, Ivey will play a Texas widow who inherits her husband's fortune and moves to Atlanta. She replaces actress Julia Duffy, whose contract wasn't renewed after one season on the show.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judith Ivey has always been the bridesmaid, never the bride. Not that she hasn't had ample opportunities at stardom. The Texas-native has two Tony Awards for her supporting roles in "Steaming" and "Hurlyburly" and garnered crackerjack reviews for her supporting performances in such films as "Compromising Positions," "Hello Again" and "In Country." But those films didn't burn up the box office. "People don't read movie reviews," said Ivey.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1988 | RODERICK MANN
Anyone wondering why it is that Judith Ivey lives in New York rather than out here should spend 10 minutes reading her theater notices. They are the kind guaranteed to make even the most spoiled actress dash off thank-you notes and send baskets of flowers. They're so glowing and adulatory that you suspect the reviewers must all be near relatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"I don't have to deal with typecasting," declared esteemed character actress Judith Ivey. "I've avoided that by proving myself capable of portraying a wide variety of characters. Consequently, there aren't really any types of parts that I yearn to play but can't get cast in, and I'm very happy with my career."
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | Don Heckman
This 1997 TV movie, based on G.D. Gearino's novel, creates a beautifully textured, eminently believable view of the complex layers of life in a small Southern town. Matthew Modine heads a notable cast that includes Tom Skerritt, Judith Ivey, Claire Bloom, James Earl Jones (pictured) and Bernadette Peters, all of whom have approached their parts with care and sensitivity (CBS Sunday at 9 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1990
"Amen," "The Hogan Family," "Mancuso, FBI" and the NBC Monday movie will go on hiatus to make way for four new sitcoms and one drama, NBC announced today. "Hunter" will move to Mondays and a revamped version of the cop series "Hardball" will return to the Friday lineup, temporarily displacing "Mancuso." On Saturday, April 14, three new shows will be introduced.
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