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Judith Krantz

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MAGAZINE
January 20, 1991
The explanation of why Judith Krantz is so popular yet receives "no respect" is explained by yourselves in an article in the same issue, "A Nation of Know-Nothings." FAWN HARRIS Van Nuys
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steve Krantz, the husband of novelist Judith Krantz who produced the X-rated animated movie "Fritz the Cat" and created successful TV miniseries out of his wife's potboilers, has died. He was 83. Krantz died Jan. 4 at a hospital in Los Angeles of complications of pneumonia, according to John Tellem, a family spokesman.
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NEWS
May 2, 1996 | LAURIE DRAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fashion meets fiction in the novels of Judith Krantz, the best-selling author of "Scruples," "Princess Daisy" and "Spring Collection," her latest about three rookie models living in Paris. "Clothes are symptomatic of a heroine's state of mind," Krantz says. "The way she dresses is part of her psychological makeup. And in real life, I think women dress from the inside out, as it were. I always wonder what makes people choose the clothes they do," she says.
BOOKS
July 16, 2000 | PATTY MARX, Patty Marx is the author of numerous books, including "The Skinny: What Every Skinny Woman Knows About Dieting (And Won't Tell You!)" and, most recently, "Meet My Staff."
Let's begin by judging the book by its cover. A photo of an effervescent Judith Krantz, then age 70 but looking 50, tops, features prominently. This is a woman with a fantastic life--the life, in fact, of a character from a Judith Krantz novel--and it shows. I covet her face lift (she's had two, she unabashedly tells us). I covet her pretty pink suit (I believe it's a Chanel). I covet her Tiffany's gold cuff bracelet (one of the many many gifts from her husband).
BOOKS
May 4, 1986 | Betty Goodwin, Goodwin is a free-lance writer.
Although it may sound like the title of a Woody Allen movie, "I'll Take Manhattan" is pure Judith Krantz ("creme de la Krantz" if you listen to her publicity machine), the fourth novel by the popular author of "Princess Daisy" and "Scruples." With its arrival on the book stands comes the announcement that the novel will be transformed into a television miniseries. That should tell you something. Much like the creators of "Dynasty" or "Dallas," Judith Krantz (the Aaron Spelling of literature?
BOOKS
June 28, 1992 | Jeannine Stein, Stein is the Times' society writer and a View columnist
Judith Krantz once said she didn't think critics reviewed her books fairly; after all, she wasn't trying to compete for the same audience that reads Dostoevski. The author of such mega-sellers as "Scruples," "Princess Daisy" and "Mistral's Daughter" has a point. Along the way she's probably been bashed for the sake of being bashed.
BOOKS
May 22, 1994 | Margo Kaufman, Margo Kaufman is the author of "1-800-AM-I-NUTS?" (Random House)
I believe that the true test of a really great bad book is that you don't hate yourself until you've finished it. It's embarrassing enough to have to go out of your way to a bookstore where they don't know you to buy it, and then make sure that nobody that you want to impress catches you reading it. (To my everlasting shame, I once ran into my high school English teacher while I holding "Valley of the Dolls," perhaps the "War and Peace" of trash literature.
REAL ESTATE
July 4, 1999 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Novelist Judith Krantz likes to dance in her bedroom. She and her husband, Steve, roll up the carpet and waltz, rumba and fox trot. Often they tango and swing. Other times, she sits by the fire in the large 40-foot-long room and reads. Whether dancing or reading, the author describes her bedroom as "cozy and gay at the same time." No wonder it is her favorite room. The walls are covered with a joyous-looking fabric depicting colorful roses and other flowers in cascading bouquets.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Judith Krantz is angry. No, she's madder than angry. Judith Krantz is livid, raging, fuming, and any other adjective you can find to describe her fury. "They keep telling me they feel as bad as I do. Like hell they do," she says peevishly. "Nobody feels as bad as I do." Why is the diminutive, dainty and usually demure Bel-Air author seeming like her evil twin this morning? (Surely, that was a Krantz plot sometime.
BOOKS
July 16, 2000 | PATTY MARX, Patty Marx is the author of numerous books, including "The Skinny: What Every Skinny Woman Knows About Dieting (And Won't Tell You!)" and, most recently, "Meet My Staff."
Let's begin by judging the book by its cover. A photo of an effervescent Judith Krantz, then age 70 but looking 50, tops, features prominently. This is a woman with a fantastic life--the life, in fact, of a character from a Judith Krantz novel--and it shows. I covet her face lift (she's had two, she unabashedly tells us). I covet her pretty pink suit (I believe it's a Chanel). I covet her Tiffany's gold cuff bracelet (one of the many many gifts from her husband).
REAL ESTATE
July 4, 1999 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Novelist Judith Krantz likes to dance in her bedroom. She and her husband, Steve, roll up the carpet and waltz, rumba and fox trot. Often they tango and swing. Other times, she sits by the fire in the large 40-foot-long room and reads. Whether dancing or reading, the author describes her bedroom as "cozy and gay at the same time." No wonder it is her favorite room. The walls are covered with a joyous-looking fabric depicting colorful roses and other flowers in cascading bouquets.
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | Book Review MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE JEWELS OF TESSA KENT by Judith Krantz Crown $25.95, 416 pages * Popularity as great as Judith Krantz's is rarely unexplainable. Her 10th novel, like the previous nine (including "Scruples," "Princess Daisy" and "Dazzle"), is a spun-sugar confection fit to rot the serious reader's teeth, but it's useless to complain. A lot of people are going to love "The Jewels of Tessa Kent" anyway, and the time is better spent acknowledging why.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | LAURIE DRAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fashion meets fiction in the novels of Judith Krantz, the best-selling author of "Scruples," "Princess Daisy" and "Spring Collection," her latest about three rookie models living in Paris. "Clothes are symptomatic of a heroine's state of mind," Krantz says. "The way she dresses is part of her psychological makeup. And in real life, I think women dress from the inside out, as it were. I always wonder what makes people choose the clothes they do," she says.
BOOKS
April 14, 1996 | Mary McNamara, Mary McNamara is associate editor at the Los Angeles Times Magazine
The moment I open "Spring Collection," Judith Krantz's latest miniseries treatment, er, novel, I am shocked and amazed. No, not by the first sentence (which begins symbolically enough with the letter O in 48-point type). Before I even get to that first sentence, I am shocked and amazed because as I skim the obligatory catalog of those works that reflect Ms. Krantz's distinctive weltanschauung, I realize that I have read almost all of them. How did this happen? When did this happen?
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | BART MILLS, Bart Mills is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
For years, one of the biggest issues in California has been land use. How much development is overdevelopment? Should property rights be balanced by future generations' right to have open space? These are weighty questions for soap-like drama to address, but Judith Krantz's "Dazzle" is a glittery two-part movie with an earthbound basis.
BOOKS
May 22, 1994 | Margo Kaufman, Margo Kaufman is the author of "1-800-AM-I-NUTS?" (Random House)
I believe that the true test of a really great bad book is that you don't hate yourself until you've finished it. It's embarrassing enough to have to go out of your way to a bookstore where they don't know you to buy it, and then make sure that nobody that you want to impress catches you reading it. (To my everlasting shame, I once ran into my high school English teacher while I holding "Valley of the Dolls," perhaps the "War and Peace" of trash literature.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 1990 | MARGY ROCHLIN, Margy Rochlin is a contributing editor of this magazine.
HELEN GURLEY BROWN is talking about Judith Krantz, who used to write for Cosmopolitan magazine and who also is a close friend. In her famous urgent whisper, Brown says, "There are people who say to Judy, 'Why don't you write something good ? Something literary ? Something you can be proud of?' Well, I'd like to put a bullet through those people's heads." Brown stops, carefully weighing the savageness of her statement. "No," she reconsiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Who says television lacks diversity? This weekend brings the best of timeslots and the worst of timeslots, the Sunday of wisdom and the Sunday of foolishness, the network of belief and the network of incredulity, the miniseries of light and the miniseries of darkness. On Sunday, we will have everything before us (Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities" on PBS) and we will have nothing before us (Judith Krantz's "Till We Meet Again" on CBS).
BOOKS
June 28, 1992 | Jeannine Stein, Stein is the Times' society writer and a View columnist
Judith Krantz once said she didn't think critics reviewed her books fairly; after all, she wasn't trying to compete for the same audience that reads Dostoevski. The author of such mega-sellers as "Scruples," "Princess Daisy" and "Mistral's Daughter" has a point. Along the way she's probably been bashed for the sake of being bashed.
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