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Judith L Hopkinson

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March 12, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Preparing to make his imprint on the University of California, Gov. Gray Davis on Thursday announced his first appointments to the UC Board of Regents: Paramount Pictures chief Sherry L. Lansing, San Diego Padres owner John J. Moores and Newport Beach businesswoman Judith L. Hopkinson. The appointments come a week before Davis will push his first initiative before the board: a proposal to admit the top 4% of students from each public high school in California.
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NEWS
March 12, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Preparing to make his imprint on the University of California, Gov. Gray Davis on Thursday announced his first appointments to the UC Board of Regents: Paramount Pictures chief Sherry L. Lansing, San Diego Padres owner John J. Moores and Newport Beach businesswoman Judith L. Hopkinson. The appointments come a week before Davis will push his first initiative before the board: a proposal to admit the top 4% of students from each public high school in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2006 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to tighten controls over executive benefits and restore public confidence in the university's leadership, the UC Board of Regents on Thursday approved the creation of three high-ranking jobs supervising finances. By launching searches to fill those positions, the regents acknowledged criticism from legislators and independent auditors that too many decisions about executive salaries and perks have been poorly handled and lacked proper oversight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2006 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Alarmed by declining numbers of African American students at UCLA and other campuses, University of California regents on Wednesday decided to study the effect of the state's 10-year-old ban on affirmative action on UC admissions and student enrollment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Prominent Latino faculty members at the University of California on Monday urged the UC regents to address what the group described as a "crisis of Latino inequity" at all levels of the university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six years after the University of California became the first university system in the country to ban race-based affirmative action programs, UC regents are set to consider a mostly symbolic compromise that would remove the ban from admissions guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2009 | Larry Gordon
A much-debated plan by the University of California to expand its freshman applicant pool and reduce the tests required for admission won final approval Thursday from the Board of Regents. The new rules, among other changes, mean that applicants will no longer be required to submit scores from two SAT subject exams but as before, must take the main SAT or ACT test, as well as 15 UC-approved college prep courses in high school and keep a minimum 3.0 grade-point average.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009 | Larry Gordon
University of California regents Wednesday gave preliminary approval to a controversial change in freshman admission standards that would drop the requirement for two SAT subject exams and make more students eligible for a review of their applications while guaranteeing entry to fewer. The change is considered among the most sweeping admissions policy shifts by the university in years.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | REBECCA TROUNSON and JILL LEOVY, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Six years after banning affirmative action and plunging into a wrenching national debate over race-based preferences, University of California regents voted unanimously Wednesday to drop their controversial policy. The turnaround was mainly symbolic. Voters approved a statewide ballot measure, Proposition 209, the year after the university imposed its ban, and the initiative continues to prohibit affirmative action in all state agencies. But regents and university officials said the shift in policy could have some actual impact in two areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | REBECCA TROUNSON and JILL LEOVY, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Six years after banning affirmative action and plunging into a wrenching national debate over race-based preferences, University of California regents voted unanimously Wednesday to drop their controversial policy. The turnaround was mainly symbolic. Voters approved a statewide ballot measure, Proposition 209, the year after the university imposed its ban, and the initiative continues to prohibit affirmative action in all state agencies.
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