Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudith Martin
IN THE NEWS

Judith Martin

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
November 16, 1986 | Susan Stamberg, Stamberg is between anchors. For 14 years, she hosted National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." In January, she host NPR's new "Weekend Edition" on Sunday mornings.
They should have asked John Updike to write this review. Not just because he is arguably our finest book reviewer, but also because he is a gentleman critic, polite and considerate. Such qualities are always pleasant but become downright crucial when reviewing the second novel of a writer whose pen name, in other circumstances (columns, TV spots, best sellers), is Miss Manners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Born a perfect lady in an imperfect society, Miss Manners is the pioneer mother of today's civility movement." So begins Judith Martin's tongue-in-cheek official biographical statement. Martin, 62, adjudicates social behavior as Miss Manners for the etiquette-challenged in a United Features syndicated column carried by more than 200 newspapers. Her books offer advice, rebukes and wry commentary about virtually every important social activity and most human foibles.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 25, 1990
The new etiquette book by Judith Martin must surely be the book she was promoting when her mink coat was stolen from a limo outside a bookstore. That Miss Manners would say, "We have such a long time to go to get to some place approaching civilization" while traipsing about in an animal skin is an irony that is not lost on this gentle reader. EDIE WARWICK, El Segundo
BUSINESS
November 4, 1996 | PAT PRINCE ROSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may come as a bit of a surprise to some Gentle Readers--specifically those who have not consulted Miss Manners since they last prepared for a wedding or some other social occasion involving multiple forks. But many savvy ladies and gentlemen with more than a passing interest in the proper way to comport oneself in the modern workplace--and how to survive the insufferable boors who haven't a clue--know that Miss Manners, a.k.a.
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | MARY LOU LOPER
COMMON COURTESY: IN WHICH MISS MANNERS SOLVES THE PROBLEM THAT BAFFLED MR. JEFFERSON by Judith Martin (Atheneum: $10.95). Thomas Paine argued for the rights of man. Now Judith Martin ("Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior") suggests good manners as a refined cure for the nation's epidemic of rudeness.
BOOKS
July 19, 1992
(To reviewer Judith Martin) Early Sunday morning a call came from Phil and Vivian in Long Beach. A while back I had mentioned to them that the L.A. Times had requested a copy of "Italian Hours," and they've kept their eyes open, hoping that some stray--very stray--note would appear, probably on the food page. At first they missed (Judith Martin's) review (May 10)) because, as Phil said, "It was too big!," but Vivian spotted it over cereal. I calmed Phil down. You can understand how such attention pleases me. My last book on Henry James came out in 1986, and after considerable success among the academic reviewers, it sold 723 copies, and the royalties, which have so far amounted to $47.03, continue to dribble in. I wasn't after the "Italian Hours" project for the cash (I gave up royalties on the first--and only projected--printing to help keep the price down)
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Born a perfect lady in an imperfect society, Miss Manners is the pioneer mother of today's civility movement." So begins Judith Martin's tongue-in-cheek official biographical statement. Martin, 62, adjudicates social behavior as Miss Manners for the etiquette-challenged in a United Features syndicated column carried by more than 200 newspapers. Her books offer advice, rebukes and wry commentary about virtually every important social activity and most human foibles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | CONNIE BENESCH
Judith Martin is the author of the "Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior" and has been writing the Miss Manners syndicated column since 1978. These are her views on how people should behave in Hollywood--or anywhere else. * After screenings: "You're obliged to be polite. You find something nice to say. I mean, the vaguer, the better. I'm not against the blatant, 'It's simply wonderful.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Amy: Help! On second thought, make that: Help, please! Ms. Vanderbilt, you must be turning over in your grave because of the problems that polite society is suffering as we enter the '90s. I mean, as manners go, I'm not exactly a model of decorum. (I take special pleasure in cutting off Camaros on the freeway).
BUSINESS
November 4, 1996 | PAT PRINCE ROSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may come as a bit of a surprise to some Gentle Readers--specifically those who have not consulted Miss Manners since they last prepared for a wedding or some other social occasion involving multiple forks. But many savvy ladies and gentlemen with more than a passing interest in the proper way to comport oneself in the modern workplace--and how to survive the insufferable boors who haven't a clue--know that Miss Manners, a.k.a.
NEWS
August 21, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Miss Manners insists on the E-word," writes Judith Martin in "Miss Manners Rescues Civilization," the latest in her long-running series of lighthearted lessons in behaving well in our benighted world. The "E-word," of course, is etiquette, and etiquette has long been a highly lucrative enterprise for Martin. Why, she has even registered "Miss Manners" as a trademark, and a federal trademark symbol is neatly affixed to the famous name on the cover of her book.
BOOKS
March 17, 1996 | Elizabeth Houghton, Elizabeth Houghton is a writer who lives in New York
Mating season is here, and far less carnage will be reported if all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed lovers eager to couple get their kid-gloved mitts on Judith Martin's new book before innocently venturing out of the woods and down the aisle.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1992 | CONNIE BENESCH
Judith Martin is the author of the "Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior" and has been writing the Miss Manners syndicated column since 1978. These are her views on how people should behave in Hollywood--or anywhere else. * After screenings: "You're obliged to be polite. You find something nice to say. I mean, the vaguer, the better. I'm not against the blatant, 'It's simply wonderful.
BOOKS
July 19, 1992
(To reviewer Judith Martin) Early Sunday morning a call came from Phil and Vivian in Long Beach. A while back I had mentioned to them that the L.A. Times had requested a copy of "Italian Hours," and they've kept their eyes open, hoping that some stray--very stray--note would appear, probably on the food page. At first they missed (Judith Martin's) review (May 10)) because, as Phil said, "It was too big!," but Vivian spotted it over cereal. I calmed Phil down. You can understand how such attention pleases me. My last book on Henry James came out in 1986, and after considerable success among the academic reviewers, it sold 723 copies, and the royalties, which have so far amounted to $47.03, continue to dribble in. I wasn't after the "Italian Hours" project for the cash (I gave up royalties on the first--and only projected--printing to help keep the price down)
NEWS
February 25, 1990
The new etiquette book by Judith Martin must surely be the book she was promoting when her mink coat was stolen from a limo outside a bookstore. That Miss Manners would say, "We have such a long time to go to get to some place approaching civilization" while traipsing about in an animal skin is an irony that is not lost on this gentle reader. EDIE WARWICK, El Segundo
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Amy: Help! On second thought, make that: Help, please! Ms. Vanderbilt, you must be turning over in your grave because of the problems that polite society is suffering as we enter the '90s. I mean, as manners go, I'm not exactly a model of decorum. (I take special pleasure in cutting off Camaros on the freeway).
NEWS
August 21, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Miss Manners insists on the E-word," writes Judith Martin in "Miss Manners Rescues Civilization," the latest in her long-running series of lighthearted lessons in behaving well in our benighted world. The "E-word," of course, is etiquette, and etiquette has long been a highly lucrative enterprise for Martin. Why, she has even registered "Miss Manners" as a trademark, and a federal trademark symbol is neatly affixed to the famous name on the cover of her book.
BOOKS
March 17, 1996 | Elizabeth Houghton, Elizabeth Houghton is a writer who lives in New York
Mating season is here, and far less carnage will be reported if all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed lovers eager to couple get their kid-gloved mitts on Judith Martin's new book before innocently venturing out of the woods and down the aisle.
BOOKS
November 16, 1986 | Susan Stamberg, Stamberg is between anchors. For 14 years, she hosted National Public Radio's "All Things Considered." In January, she host NPR's new "Weekend Edition" on Sunday mornings.
They should have asked John Updike to write this review. Not just because he is arguably our finest book reviewer, but also because he is a gentleman critic, polite and considerate. Such qualities are always pleasant but become downright crucial when reviewing the second novel of a writer whose pen name, in other circumstances (columns, TV spots, best sellers), is Miss Manners.
BOOKS
November 24, 1985 | MARY LOU LOPER
COMMON COURTESY: IN WHICH MISS MANNERS SOLVES THE PROBLEM THAT BAFFLED MR. JEFFERSON by Judith Martin (Atheneum: $10.95). Thomas Paine argued for the rights of man. Now Judith Martin ("Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior") suggests good manners as a refined cure for the nation's epidemic of rudeness.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|