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Judith Miller

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OPINION
November 13, 2005
Your article on Judith Miller's "retirement" (Nov. 10) from the New York Times was delicious. This reporter has spent years cozying up to the right wing, haranguing her colleagues and insinuating herself with her so-called sources. What a disgrace. The Old Gray Lady ain't what it used to be. JOANNE C. MURRAY Santa Barbara
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OPINION
April 14, 2013
Re "Facing jail time for doing her job," Opinion, April 9 Judith Miller sees a "travesty of justice" in forcing a reporter to divulge the identity of a confidential source who leaked information pertinent to a criminal trial. The real travesty would be if a single journalist affected an accused's right to a fair trial. Reporters have no business deciding the significance of information covered by a judge's gag order, as the Fox News journalist did in this case by reporting leaked material in the trial of accused Colorado movie theater shooter James Holmes.
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OPINION
October 18, 2005
Re "N.Y. Times Breaks Silence on Jailed Writer," Oct. 16 Say what you will, but Judith Miller protected a possible hostile news source despite criticism from her own newspaper, and she defied her own attorney in spite of the extreme lengths to which this administration has intruded on individual rights. In my book, Miller goes down as a true heroine for journalistic integrity and pure guts. RALPH MITCHELL Monterey Park Miller's award from Cal State Fullerton is rather odd. First Amendment awards are given to those who protect their sources from retribution.
OPINION
March 24, 2010
Money and politics Re "Whitman wealth effect," March 18 What boggles the mind is how easily voters seem to have been suckered by gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman's slick media blitz when her three-part plan for California -- repeated over and over -- makes absolutely no sense: "fix" education, create jobs and cut spending. With California education already severely underfunded, how do we "fix" it by spending even less? Whitman claims to know something about how to create jobs from her EBay experience.
BOOKS
June 17, 1990 | John K. Roth, Roth, professor of philosophy at Claremont McKenna College, has published "Approaches to Auschwitz" (John Knox) and "Holocaust: Religious and Philosophical Implications" (Paragon) and is currently working on "Memory Offended: The Auschwitz Convent Controversy" (Praeger/Greenwood)
On April 12, 1990, East Germany installed its first democratic government. Immediately the Parliament issued an apology. Admitting responsibility "for the humiliation, expulsion and murder of Jewish women, men and children," it reversed 40 years of East German denial of responsibility for the Holocaust, the Third Reich's genocidal "Final Solution," which annihilated nearly 6 million Jews.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2005 | Greg Miller and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
Notebooks used by New York Times reporter Judith Miller during interviews with Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff contain variations of the name of an undercover CIA officer whose identity might have been illegally leaked, the newspaper reported in today's editions. Miller, in a first-person account of her interviews with top Cheney aide I.
OPINION
July 11, 2005
Re "Journalist Jailed for Not Revealing Source to Court," July 7 U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Hogan's misguided decision to jail New York Times journalist Judith Miller after she refused to cooperate with a grand jury investigating the disclosure of a covert CIA operative's identity reminds me of a quote by Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis: "Experience should teach us to be most on guard to protect liberty when the government's purposes are...
OPINION
April 14, 2013
Re "Facing jail time for doing her job," Opinion, April 9 Judith Miller sees a "travesty of justice" in forcing a reporter to divulge the identity of a confidential source who leaked information pertinent to a criminal trial. The real travesty would be if a single journalist affected an accused's right to a fair trial. Reporters have no business deciding the significance of information covered by a judge's gag order, as the Fox News journalist did in this case by reporting leaked material in the trial of accused Colorado movie theater shooter James Holmes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2005
Let me share my "Looking Glass" version of Tim Rutten's column about Matt Cooper and Judith Miller facing jail time because they refuse to reveal their journalistic sources ["Reporters Should Be Shielded From Jail," Feb. 19]. Bush administration officials realize, as have powerful people before them, that a free press threatens their ability to rule as they please. So instead of resisting the press, they co-opt them. Instead of keeping information from journalists, they flood those journalists with anonymous bits of information.
OPINION
October 24, 2004
Re "An Exchange on Reporters and Their Confidential Sources," Commentary, Oct. 20: In the ongoing debate over whether a New York Times reporter should be forced to divulge her sources, there is one obvious question I have never seen asked of those who support disclosure, such as Michael Kinsley. If the information is so vital, why is the prosecutor conducting a fishing expedition against a reporter who may (or may not) have talked to the source of the leak, rather than compelling Robert Novak to divulge his source?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
The first thing writer-director Rod Lurie wants you to know about his new film "Nothing but the Truth" is that it wasn't inspired by Judith Miller. In fact, he's tired of denying that it has to do with the former New York Times reporter based in Washington, D.C., who was jailed for contempt of court in July 2005 for refusing to testify before a federal grand jury investigating a leak naming Valerie Plame as a covert CIA agent. (Miller hadn't written an article revealing Plame but was supposedly in possession of relevant information regarding the leak.)
NATIONAL
January 31, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Testifying against a source she once went to jail to protect, former New York Times reporter Judith Miller said Tuesday that she had three discussions with former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby in which he told her that the wife of a Bush administration critic worked for the CIA. Miller described one meeting with Libby that occurred a full two weeks before the time that Libby has told investigators he first learned about CIA operative Valerie Plame from another journalist.
OPINION
November 13, 2005
Your article on Judith Miller's "retirement" (Nov. 10) from the New York Times was delicious. This reporter has spent years cozying up to the right wing, haranguing her colleagues and insinuating herself with her so-called sources. What a disgrace. The Old Gray Lady ain't what it used to be. JOANNE C. MURRAY Santa Barbara
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2005 | TIM RUTTEN
THE Judith Miller soap opera shuddered to an all-too-appropriate close this week in the all-but-inevitable forums -- on the talk shows and the Internet. Call it the final installment of "Desperate Reporters." The veteran New York Times reporter served 85 days in a federal lockup for refusing to name a confidential source to a grand jury investigating the leak of CIA agent Valerie Plame's identity to a clutch of Washington reporters.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2005 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
The New York Times announced Wednesday that correspondent Judith Miller, who went to jail for 85 days rather than divulge a source in the CIA leak investigation, had resigned, effective immediately. Miller had become a contentious figure in journalism, both for her actions in the leak case and for her reporting on Iraqi weapons programs in the months before the U.S. invasion of Iraq.
OPINION
November 3, 2005
Max Boot (Opinion, Nov. 2) takes the prize for spinning the Valerie Plame leak into the proverbial glass is half full. If I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby and other White House officials were "merely setting the record straight," why did Libby request anonymity in conversations with New York Times reporter Judith Miller? "Petty-ante perjury"? I agree it's not comparable to the Monica Lewinsky inquiry, but isn't that the point? This one led to war. MANLEY WITTEN Los Angeles The Times finally prints in Opinion critical background detail on Joseph C. Wilson IV and Plame.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
New York Times reporter Judith Miller on Wednesday completed her testimony before a grand jury investigating the leak of a CIA officer's name after she was summoned for a second appearance to discuss a previously undisclosed conversation she had had with Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff. Miller and her lawyer, Robert S. Bennett, emerged from the courthouse after she gave more than an hour's worth of testimony to grand jurors. Both declined to comment.
OPINION
November 3, 2005
Max Boot (Opinion, Nov. 2) takes the prize for spinning the Valerie Plame leak into the proverbial glass is half full. If I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby and other White House officials were "merely setting the record straight," why did Libby request anonymity in conversations with New York Times reporter Judith Miller? "Petty-ante perjury"? I agree it's not comparable to the Monica Lewinsky inquiry, but isn't that the point? This one led to war. MANLEY WITTEN Los Angeles The Times finally prints in Opinion critical background detail on Joseph C. Wilson IV and Plame.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
Among the string of prominent and powerful Washingtonians who traipsed through the Alexandria Detention Center to visit New York Times reporter Judith Miller this summer was former Navy Secretary Richard Danzig. Danzig, who is now a Defense Department bioterrorism consultant, had come to the lockup to offer the embattled journalist comfort and support. Yet he came away from the 30-minute conversation feeling as energized and impressed as he had in many previous meetings with the star reporter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2005 | TIM RUTTEN
IN an extraordinary memo on the Judith Miller affair sent to the New York Times staff late Friday afternoon, the paper's executive editor, Bill Keller, did something far more important than admit errors and explain why they occurred. He took the focus of this lacerating incident off the Times' internal workings as a media institution and put it squarely where it belongs: on Miller, the individual journalist.
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