Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudith Resnik
IN THE NEWS

Judith Resnik

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 18, 1988
The father of Challenger astronaut Judith Resnik said that the family has reached a settlement with the manufacturer of the shuttle's booster rocket. "I'm very angry at the way they (Morton Thiokol Inc.) treated us and the other families," Dr. Marvin Resnik said from his Encinitas home. "But I'm not angry enough to put the family through the agony of a long trial." Resnik, 68, a retired optometrist, said the settlement is "in the ballpark" of the $2 million to $3.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990
I was interested in Barbara Isenberg's Oct. 7 article, "Her Generation," about Wendy Wasserstein. I was, however, struck by an odd sentence about the playwright's family. After discussing Wasserstein's three siblings, the article states: "All except Wendy have had families." What is meant is that Wasserstein has not had children--but of course, as is discussed directly adjacent to the sentence quoted--Wasserstein does have a family. Much of Wasserstein's work, and that of others of "her generation," has been to avoid defining women exclusively in terms of their role as mothers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990
I was interested in Barbara Isenberg's Oct. 7 article, "Her Generation," about Wendy Wasserstein. I was, however, struck by an odd sentence about the playwright's family. After discussing Wasserstein's three siblings, the article states: "All except Wendy have had families." What is meant is that Wasserstein has not had children--but of course, as is discussed directly adjacent to the sentence quoted--Wasserstein does have a family. Much of Wasserstein's work, and that of others of "her generation," has been to avoid defining women exclusively in terms of their role as mothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The widows of several crew members aboard the Challenger space shuttle say they are upset about plans by ABC to make a three-hour television movie about the accident, the Associated Press reported. Loran Onizuka, widow of Challenger astronaut Ellison Onizuka, and Jane Smith, widow of Challenger pilot Michael Smith, and their attorney have talked to George Englund, executive producer and writer of the ABC drama, in an effort to get him to drop the project. "Why do we have to relive this?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989
Three years after the space shuttle Challenger blew up, a small group of Irvine residents will commemorate it and the seven crew members who died by changing the name of their street to Challenger. In a short ceremony at 2 p.m. today, Dr. Marvin Resnik, father of astronaut Judith Resnik, will remove the covers on two new signs and officially change the block-long street's name from Norfolk to Challenger. Actually, Irvine resident Les Kaufman explained, his community of Northwood Glen had received permission from the city to change the street name from one that recalled blue-green pines to Challenger as long ago as April 22, 1986, not quite 3 months after the Jan. 28, 1986, disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1989
More than 3 years after the 1986 space shuttle disaster, a group of Irvine residents celebrated new street signs Friday, renaming the entryway to their community Challenger in honor of the crew. "It was the American thing to do," said Northwood Glen resident Les Kaufman, who attended a dedication ceremony on the former Norfolk Street. Kaufman, who with other community leaders had sought the name change, said it was a way to "honor the heroes in our society." Dr. Marvin Resnik, father of the late astronaut Judith Resnik, attended the ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
An artist was unable to find a buyer for his 6-foot-4 portrait of Judith Resnik, one of the seven astronauts killed when the shuttle Challenger exploded Jan. 28, 1986. Ralph Herzog, 28, of Norton, Ohio, had hoped to sell the work to an exhibitor for $10,000 with the proceeds going to Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron. But no buyers surfaced, so Herzog gave the painting to Resnik's father, Marvin Resnik, a San Diego optometrist. "He spent a lot of time and work on it," Resnik said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The widows of several crew members aboard the Challenger space shuttle say they are upset about plans by ABC to make a three-hour television movie about the accident, the Associated Press reported. Loran Onizuka, widow of Challenger astronaut Ellison Onizuka, and Jane Smith, widow of Challenger pilot Michael Smith, and their attorney have talked to George Englund, executive producer and writer of the ABC drama, in an effort to get him to drop the project. "Why do we have to relive this?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1986
While as a nation we grieve for the seven crew members who gave their lives in the name of discovery, let us not be angered by our commitment to the manned space program. The seven astronauts who died aboard Challenger were pursuing one of man's most fundamental desires, that of exploration. Whether they were pilots commanding a craft beyond our atmosphere, or engineers taking technology to a place most of us only dream of, or educators helping to bring that dream back home, all were graced with that certain pioneering quality.
MAGAZINE
February 11, 1990
The introduction to "Slouching Toward the Millennium," by Jack Jones (Dec. 24/31), stated: "We thought it might be wise to ask for help in preparing" a story on the next decade and so turned to "specialists" for predictions about the future. When seeking assistance on the environment, race relations, education, art, business, politics, religion, medicine, sports, science and world affairs, you asked men. When asking about food, fashion and "trends," you asked women. Thus, one prediction needs no "specialist."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1989
More than 3 years after the 1986 space shuttle disaster, a group of Irvine residents celebrated new street signs Friday, renaming the entryway to their community Challenger in honor of the crew. "It was the American thing to do," said Northwood Glen resident Les Kaufman, who attended a dedication ceremony on the former Norfolk Street. Kaufman, who with other community leaders had sought the name change, said it was a way to "honor the heroes in our society." Dr. Marvin Resnik, father of the late astronaut Judith Resnik, attended the ceremony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1989
Three years after the space shuttle Challenger blew up, a small group of Irvine residents will commemorate it and the seven crew members who died by changing the name of their street to Challenger. In a short ceremony at 2 p.m. today, Dr. Marvin Resnik, father of astronaut Judith Resnik, will remove the covers on two new signs and officially change the block-long street's name from Norfolk to Challenger. Actually, Irvine resident Les Kaufman explained, his community of Northwood Glen had received permission from the city to change the street name from one that recalled blue-green pines to Challenger as long ago as April 22, 1986, not quite 3 months after the Jan. 28, 1986, disaster.
NEWS
February 18, 1988
The father of Challenger astronaut Judith Resnik said that the family has reached a settlement with the manufacturer of the shuttle's booster rocket. "I'm very angry at the way they (Morton Thiokol Inc.) treated us and the other families," Dr. Marvin Resnik said from his Encinitas home. "But I'm not angry enough to put the family through the agony of a long trial." Resnik, 68, a retired optometrist, said the settlement is "in the ballpark" of the $2 million to $3.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
An artist was unable to find a buyer for his 6-foot-4 portrait of Judith Resnik, one of the seven astronauts killed when the shuttle Challenger exploded Jan. 28, 1986. Ralph Herzog, 28, of Norton, Ohio, had hoped to sell the work to an exhibitor for $10,000 with the proceeds going to Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron. But no buyers surfaced, so Herzog gave the painting to Resnik's father, Marvin Resnik, a San Diego optometrist. "He spent a lot of time and work on it," Resnik said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1986
While as a nation we grieve for the seven crew members who gave their lives in the name of discovery, let us not be angered by our commitment to the manned space program. The seven astronauts who died aboard Challenger were pursuing one of man's most fundamental desires, that of exploration. Whether they were pilots commanding a craft beyond our atmosphere, or engineers taking technology to a place most of us only dream of, or educators helping to bring that dream back home, all were graced with that certain pioneering quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1988 | ANTHONY PERRY, Times Staff Writer
The father of Challenger astronaut Judith Resnik said Wednesday that the family has reached a settlement with the manufacturer of the shuttle's booster rocket rather than relive the Challenger tragedy during a trial. "I'm very angry at the way they (Morton Thiokol Inc.) treated us and the other families," Dr. Marvin Resnik said from his Encinitas home. "But I'm not angry enough to put the family through the agony of a long trial."
WORLD
January 6, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
A man stole a small aircraft at gunpoint Sunday and flew it over downtown Frankfurt, circling skyscrapers and threatening to crash into the European Central Bank. He landed safely after two hours and was arrested. While two military jets and a police helicopter shadowed the plane, the hijacker told officials and journalists in contact with him by radio and cell phone that he wanted to call attention to Judith Resnik, a U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|