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Judith S Wallerstein

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April 9, 1989 | ALEX RAKSIN
SECOND CHANCES Men, Women and Children a Decade After Divorce by Judith S. Wallerstein with Sandra Blakeslee (Ticknor & Fields: $19.95; 329 pp.) When he first arrived at Judith Wallerstein's Marin County Center for the Family in ransition shortly after his parents' divorce, six-year-old John wouldn't say a word, preferring to gather baby dolls in the center's play-room. Setting the dolls firmly on their feet, he placed miniature tables, chairs and beds on their heads. On the steep roof of a nearby dollhouse, he then put mother and father dolls in precarious positions, gently catching each one as it began sliding off the roof.
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September 24, 2000 | VALERIE H. COLB, Valerie H. Colb is a family lawyer and the co-author with Susan Goldstein of "The Smart Divorce."
There was a time not long ago, in the "perfect" world of the 1950s, when every American family at the dinner table was expected to resemble a Norman Rockwell painting and any marriage that ended in divorce was considered a disgrace. Divorce, declared sociology textbooks of the time, was a public acknowledgment of failure, and a man or woman who was divorced often became an object of scorn and gossip in the neighborhood.
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BOOKS
September 24, 2000 | VALERIE H. COLB, Valerie H. Colb is a family lawyer and the co-author with Susan Goldstein of "The Smart Divorce."
There was a time not long ago, in the "perfect" world of the 1950s, when every American family at the dinner table was expected to resemble a Norman Rockwell painting and any marriage that ended in divorce was considered a disgrace. Divorce, declared sociology textbooks of the time, was a public acknowledgment of failure, and a man or woman who was divorced often became an object of scorn and gossip in the neighborhood.
BOOKS
April 9, 1989 | ALEX RAKSIN
SECOND CHANCES Men, Women and Children a Decade After Divorce by Judith S. Wallerstein with Sandra Blakeslee (Ticknor & Fields: $19.95; 329 pp.) When he first arrived at Judith Wallerstein's Marin County Center for the Family in ransition shortly after his parents' divorce, six-year-old John wouldn't say a word, preferring to gather baby dolls in the center's play-room. Setting the dolls firmly on their feet, he placed miniature tables, chairs and beds on their heads. On the steep roof of a nearby dollhouse, he then put mother and father dolls in precarious positions, gently catching each one as it began sliding off the roof.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When it comes to the effects of divorce on children, all parental splits are not created equal. That is what recent research from the University of Pennsylvania has found--research that is changing conventional wisdom on divorce. "Two different kinds of marriages that end in divorce have very different impacts on children as adults," said Paul Amato, a Pennsylvania State University professor of sociology whose research was recently published in the Journal of Marriage and the Family.
NEWS
June 3, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adults who end a marriage know divorce to be a painful but time-limited crisis in which the most severe impact occurs when the union comes apart. But for children, according to new data from the nation's longest ongoing study of families and divorce, it turns out to be a long-term, cumulative experience whose impact increases over time. For children, Marin County psychologist Judith S.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court, decreeing a major shift in family law, ruled Monday that a divorced parent who has child custody can move to a new city or state even if the other parent objects. The parent with primary physical custody, the court held, need not show that the relocation is essential for a new job or other reason, only that it is in good faith.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clearly, the couple in their 60s had traveled this conversational road before. You should be more aggressive in pursuing your mother's inheritance, the husband told his wife. That's real money and you're entitled to your share of it, he pressed. Besides, there's that gold-digging sister of yours, and if you don't watch out, she'll walk off with every single cent. . . . "Robert!" interrupted the wife, who at this point had had enough. End of discussion.
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