Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJudith Viorst
IN THE NEWS

Judith Viorst

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On three separate occasions, Alexander Viorst fell out of trees and broke a leg. One day, he swallowed turpentine. And let us not forget the chewing-gum-in-the-hair gambit. These truly were terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days. In fact, they were so terrible, horrible, no good and very bad that his mother, Judith Viorst, chose to immortalize them in a book that has become a classic survival guide for children--and parents--navigating life's very bad days.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a gray, sleeting winter morning, and Judith Viorst was packed and poised to begin her New York-Washington-Chicago-St. Louis-Portland-Los Angeles tour to promote her book on controlling your life. At the airport, she found out all the flights had been canceled. Undeterred, she made her way to the train station and bought a seat to D.C.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Fans of humorist Judith Viorst already know that she is audience-specific. Her target is the WAMMMMs: those unsung throngs of White, Affluent, Middle-class, Middle-aged, Married Mothers. Viorst's several books have addressed themselves to life changes seen from that perspective, virtually decade by decade. Viorst has her fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997
Re Anne Bancroft ("Escaping Mrs. Robinson," by John Clark, Aug. 10): Does no one remember that David Letterman's ill-fated "Uma/Oprah" routine was actually based on a sketch from a TV special Bancroft made years ago? In it, she has a nightmare where she goes to a party and has to introduce Mia to Ava and then Ava to Uta and then Mia and Ava and Uta to Ulu and so on, spinning out the routine until it encompassed a list of 27 similarly named personalities. In her hands, the sketch was hilarious and showed a master at work.
BOOKS
April 27, 1986 | Elinor Lenz, Lenz is author of "Once My Child, Now My Friend" (Warner Books). and
Life is a balance sheet in which the losses we suffer along the way are offset by what they contribute to our development as independent, responsible, connected people. So argues Judith Viorst in "Necessary Losses."
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
When Did I Stop Being 20 and Other Injustices: Selected Poems From Single to Mid-Life by Judith Viorst (Simon & Schuster: $10.95). Judith Viorst is probably best known for her recent best-selling "Necessary Losses," a sociological analysis of the steps in aging. But--where have I been?--for many years, she has published both children's books and anthologies of vers de societe , whose long titles pretty much summarize their contents.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997
Re Anne Bancroft ("Escaping Mrs. Robinson," by John Clark, Aug. 10): Does no one remember that David Letterman's ill-fated "Uma/Oprah" routine was actually based on a sketch from a TV special Bancroft made years ago? In it, she has a nightmare where she goes to a party and has to introduce Mia to Ava and then Ava to Uta and then Mia and Ava and Uta to Ulu and so on, spinning out the routine until it encompassed a list of 27 similarly named personalities. In her hands, the sketch was hilarious and showed a master at work.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
After nearly 30 years of marriage, author Judith Viorst says she has learned one of the secrets to a long and happy relationship: Shut up. "It used to be that every time we'd come home from a dinner party, I'd give my husband a complete review of his conduct for the evening," says Viorst. "I'd analyze everything. The jokes that were getting stale, the things he said, the things he didn't say. Everything. "Now that I'm in my 50s, I say to myself, 'I'm not raising this man. I'm not his mother.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
M erry is the operative word here, although sex and violence do figure into the equation. Even so, fans of Chandler, Hammett and company may find Judith Viorst a tad bland in the department, though she rates at least a six for sex. "Murdering Mr. Monti" is actually about thinking of murdering Mr. Monti, an exercise that provides ample opportunities for the author's wit and antic humor, but offers relatively few chances for overt antisocial acts.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On three separate occasions, Alexander Viorst fell out of trees and broke a leg. One day, he swallowed turpentine. And let us not forget the chewing-gum-in-the-hair gambit. These truly were terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days. In fact, they were so terrible, horrible, no good and very bad that his mother, Judith Viorst, chose to immortalize them in a book that has become a classic survival guide for children--and parents--navigating life's very bad days.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
M erry is the operative word here, although sex and violence do figure into the equation. Even so, fans of Chandler, Hammett and company may find Judith Viorst a tad bland in the department, though she rates at least a six for sex. "Murdering Mr. Monti" is actually about thinking of murdering Mr. Monti, an exercise that provides ample opportunities for the author's wit and antic humor, but offers relatively few chances for overt antisocial acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Fans of humorist Judith Viorst already know that she is audience-specific. Her target is the WAMMMMs: those unsung throngs of White, Affluent, Middle-class, Middle-aged, Married Mothers. Viorst's several books have addressed themselves to life changes seen from that perspective, virtually decade by decade. Viorst has her fans.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
After nearly 30 years of marriage, author Judith Viorst says she has learned one of the secrets to a long and happy relationship: Shut up. "It used to be that every time we'd come home from a dinner party, I'd give my husband a complete review of his conduct for the evening," says Viorst. "I'd analyze everything. The jokes that were getting stale, the things he said, the things he didn't say. Everything. "Now that I'm in my 50s, I say to myself, 'I'm not raising this man. I'm not his mother.
NEWS
January 28, 1988 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
When Did I Stop Being 20 and Other Injustices: Selected Poems From Single to Mid-Life by Judith Viorst (Simon & Schuster: $10.95). Judith Viorst is probably best known for her recent best-selling "Necessary Losses," a sociological analysis of the steps in aging. But--where have I been?--for many years, she has published both children's books and anthologies of vers de societe , whose long titles pretty much summarize their contents.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a gray, sleeting winter morning, and Judith Viorst was packed and poised to begin her New York-Washington-Chicago-St. Louis-Portland-Los Angeles tour to promote her book on controlling your life. At the airport, she found out all the flights had been canceled. Undeterred, she made her way to the train station and bought a seat to D.C.
BOOKS
April 27, 1986 | Elinor Lenz, Lenz is author of "Once My Child, Now My Friend" (Warner Books). and
Life is a balance sheet in which the losses we suffer along the way are offset by what they contribute to our development as independent, responsible, connected people. So argues Judith Viorst in "Necessary Losses."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|