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Judy Baca

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1989
Judy Baca, assistant professor of studio art at UC Irvine, has been elected to the board of trustees of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles. A muralist and arts activist, Baca co-founded the Social and Public Art Resource Center in the Venice area of Los Angeles. She is artistic director for the center. MOCA announced that its six new trustees were chosen "to reflect the changing Los Angeles multi-cultural, multi-ethnic community."
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 29, 2011
For decades, Los Angeles was a mecca for muralists. Lush and bold, murals sprouted like indigenous flora from Boyle Heights to the ocean to South Los Angeles. The themes were as compelling as the muralists themselves — including emerging black and Latino artists — and the neighborhoods that nurtured them. Los Angeles became identified with murals and they came to define the city — Highland Park residents immortalized on a building in that neighborhood, a line of children romping along a freeway wall.
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OPINION
May 18, 2005
Re "Protest Over Art Forces Police to Draw the Line," May 15: Joseph Turner should pick his fights more carefully. Targeting the Baldwin Park Metrolink public artwork makes a laughingstock of him and his group, Save Our State. Failing to understand the origin of the quote he labels seditious, he opens himself to ridicule and being labeled a racist. His comments and attitude make me wonder if the protest against the arch wasn't really just a publicity stunt. This group would be better served if Turner were to direct his attention to the substantive issues surrounding illegal immigration.
OPINION
August 28, 2010 | Patt Morrison
In this city on wheels, this city of wheels, an image has to be large and vivid and striking to make an impression. For more than three decades, the light, the climate, the speed, the invitation of long blank walls have made Los Angeles one vast plein-air gallery, the mural capital of the world, exterior-decorated by artists like Kent Twitchell, Willie Herron, Glenna Avila, Leo Politi — and Judy Baca. Baca leads brush-first, blending aesthetics and politics, first as the mother of the city's original community mural project, Neighborhood Pride, and now as founder of the Venice-based Social and Public Art Resource Center, or SPARC.
OPINION
June 30, 2005
In the June 25 article "A Monumental War of Words," Joseph Turner, founder of Save Our State, makes it clear that "inflicting economic damage to the city of Baldwin Park" is his goal. He hopes to cost Baldwin Park so much money protecting his hate group from enraged counter-protesters that the city will tear down the monument to stay solvent. Why do police allow Save Our State's "protests," knowing that economic damage and blackmail are its stated goals? If they were spray-painting on the monument, they'd be arrested.
OPINION
October 29, 2011
For decades, Los Angeles was a mecca for muralists. Lush and bold, murals sprouted like indigenous flora from Boyle Heights to the ocean to South Los Angeles. The themes were as compelling as the muralists themselves — including emerging black and Latino artists — and the neighborhoods that nurtured them. Los Angeles became identified with murals and they came to define the city — Highland Park residents immortalized on a building in that neighborhood, a line of children romping along a freeway wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1989 | MICHAEL CICCHESE, Times Staff Writer
When Judy Baca's intermediate art class decided to paint a mural at UC Irvine, students hoped it would provoke thought about social issues. But what the artwork on a temporary construction fence sparked were complaints that the mural--which includes images of a nude woman in chains and Ku Klux Klan members--is sexist and racist, plus counter-complaints of censorship. Since work began 2 weeks ago on the 50-foot-long, 8-foot-high mural near the new Physical Sciences Building and facing Aldrich Park, questions and complaints have rolled in to university officials.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | JOSEPH N. BELL
I stopped by UC Irvine the other day to have a look at the artwork that has been causing all the fuss: a mural conceived and executed by a campus art class on about 100 yards of the zillion miles of fence surrounding campus construction sites.
OPINION
August 28, 2010 | Patt Morrison
In this city on wheels, this city of wheels, an image has to be large and vivid and striking to make an impression. For more than three decades, the light, the climate, the speed, the invitation of long blank walls have made Los Angeles one vast plein-air gallery, the mural capital of the world, exterior-decorated by artists like Kent Twitchell, Willie Herron, Glenna Avila, Leo Politi — and Judy Baca. Baca leads brush-first, blending aesthetics and politics, first as the mother of the city's original community mural project, Neighborhood Pride, and now as founder of the Venice-based Social and Public Art Resource Center, or SPARC.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Judy Baca did a little dance in Baldwin Park the other day, a very old little dance. In the dry heat of a midday sun, Baca skipped along a concrete footpath that represents ceremonial steps performed by early California inhabitants, the Gabrielino and Chumash Indians. The winding lane is part of "Danza Indigenas" (Indigenous Dances), the public artwork she designed to spruce up the Baldwin Park Metrolink commuter rail station.
OPINION
June 30, 2005
In the June 25 article "A Monumental War of Words," Joseph Turner, founder of Save Our State, makes it clear that "inflicting economic damage to the city of Baldwin Park" is his goal. He hopes to cost Baldwin Park so much money protecting his hate group from enraged counter-protesters that the city will tear down the monument to stay solvent. Why do police allow Save Our State's "protests," knowing that economic damage and blackmail are its stated goals? If they were spray-painting on the monument, they'd be arrested.
OPINION
May 18, 2005
Re "Protest Over Art Forces Police to Draw the Line," May 15: Joseph Turner should pick his fights more carefully. Targeting the Baldwin Park Metrolink public artwork makes a laughingstock of him and his group, Save Our State. Failing to understand the origin of the quote he labels seditious, he opens himself to ridicule and being labeled a racist. His comments and attitude make me wonder if the protest against the arch wasn't really just a publicity stunt. This group would be better served if Turner were to direct his attention to the substantive issues surrounding illegal immigration.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Judy Baca did a little dance in Baldwin Park the other day, a very old little dance. In the dry heat of a midday sun, Baca skipped along a concrete footpath that represents ceremonial steps performed by early California inhabitants, the Gabrielino and Chumash Indians. The winding lane is part of "Danza Indigenas" (Indigenous Dances), the public artwork she designed to spruce up the Baldwin Park Metrolink commuter rail station.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Judy Baca did a little dance here the other day, a very old little dance. In the dry heat of a midday sun, Baca skipped along a concrete footpath that represents ceremonial steps performed by early California inhabitants, the Gabrielino and Chumash Indians. The winding lane is part of "Danza Indigenas" (Indigenous Dances), the public artwork she designed to spruce up the Baldwin Park Metrolink commuter rail station.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1989
Judy Baca, assistant professor of studio art at UC Irvine, has been elected to the board of trustees of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles. A muralist and arts activist, Baca co-founded the Social and Public Art Resource Center in the Venice area of Los Angeles. She is artistic director for the center. MOCA announced that its six new trustees were chosen "to reflect the changing Los Angeles multi-cultural, multi-ethnic community."
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | JOSEPH N. BELL
I stopped by UC Irvine the other day to have a look at the artwork that has been causing all the fuss: a mural conceived and executed by a campus art class on about 100 yards of the zillion miles of fence surrounding campus construction sites.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artist Judy Baca did a little dance here the other day, a very old little dance. In the dry heat of a midday sun, Baca skipped along a concrete footpath that represents ceremonial steps performed by early California inhabitants, the Gabrielino and Chumash Indians. The winding lane is part of "Danza Indigenas" (Indigenous Dances), the public artwork she designed to spruce up the Baldwin Park Metrolink commuter rail station.
NEWS
April 19, 1992
Judy Baca, a muralist with extensive background in public art, has been chosen to create an art project at Baldwin Park's commuter rail station. An associate professor at UC Irvine, Baca is the director of "The Great Wall of Los Angeles," the world's largest mural, in the Tujunga Wash flood control channel. Baca was chosen Wednesday from a field of 25 artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1989 | MICHAEL CICCHESE, Times Staff Writer
When Judy Baca's intermediate art class decided to paint a mural at UC Irvine, students hoped it would provoke thought about social issues. But what the artwork on a temporary construction fence sparked were complaints that the mural--which includes images of a nude woman in chains and Ku Klux Klan members--is sexist and racist, plus counter-complaints of censorship. Since work began 2 weeks ago on the 50-foot-long, 8-foot-high mural near the new Physical Sciences Building and facing Aldrich Park, questions and complaints have rolled in to university officials.
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