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Judy Cagle

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March 26, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
One day next week, Judy Cagle will be free to go home to die. You may recall her story, told here just one month ago. Cagle is 37 years old and dying of AIDS. Her doctors say she may have as few as three, perhaps as many as five, months to live. For the last three years, she has been in the California Institute for Women in Frontera, where she has been serving a 14-year sentence for armed robberies in which no one was injured.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1992
As the chief executive officer at AIDS Project Los Angeles, I was disturbed to read my quote in the April 2 article on Judy Cagle's compassionate release from the California Institute for Women in Frontera. I would like to clarify the context in which I said that "prisoners on parole infect other people." This statement was part of a longer, more involved discussion. We were discussing the necessity for anonymous testing within the prison system and the fact that voluntary and anonymous testing is not available to inmates in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1992
As the chief executive officer at AIDS Project Los Angeles, I was disturbed to read my quote in the April 2 article on Judy Cagle's compassionate release from the California Institute for Women in Frontera. I would like to clarify the context in which I said that "prisoners on parole infect other people." This statement was part of a longer, more involved discussion. We were discussing the necessity for anonymous testing within the prison system and the fact that voluntary and anonymous testing is not available to inmates in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An AIDS patient who recently secured a compassionate release from prison joined activists on the outside Wednesday, calling for major reforms in the way the California penal system handles the AIDS crisis. Judy Cagle, a convicted armed robber who has become a symbol of redemption and a celebrated cause among AIDS activists, tearfully urged other inmates afflicted with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to press their fight against the disease and often unresponsive prison officials.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
Judy Cagle has a few simple wishes: She'd like to be alone with her husband. She'd like to go for a walk with her son. And, perhaps most of all, she'd like to die with dignity, in the company of people who love her. On the scale of human desire, that may not add up to much, but it is more than the state of California has been willing to grant her. Cagle is 37 and dying of AIDS. Her doctors say she has perhaps four months to live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1992 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An AIDS patient who recently secured a compassionate release from prison joined activists on the outside Wednesday, calling for major reforms in the way the California penal system handles the AIDS crisis. Judy Cagle, a convicted armed robber who has become a symbol of redemption and a celebrated cause among AIDS activists, tearfully urged other inmates afflicted with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to press their fight against the disease and often unresponsive prison officials.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
One day next week, Judy Cagle will be free to go home to die. You may recall her story, told here just one month ago. Cagle is 37 years old and dying of AIDS. Her doctors say she may have as few as three, perhaps as many as five, months to live. For the last three years, she has been in the California Institute for Women in Frontera, where she has been serving a 14-year sentence for armed robberies in which no one was injured.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
Judy Cagle has a few simple wishes: She'd like to be alone with her husband. She'd like to go for a walk with her son. And, perhaps most of all, she'd like to die with dignity, in the company of people who love her. On the scale of human desire, that may not add up to much, but it is more than the state of California has been willing to grant her. Cagle is 37 and dying of AIDS. Her doctors say she has perhaps four months to live.
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