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Judy Chicago

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October 30, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
In the great game of word-image association that is art history, when people say Judy Chicago, they picture "The Dinner Party. " An installation with dozens of hand-painted table settings dedicated to important women throughout history, the 1970s work elicited impassioned debate, fast becoming a national symbol for feminist art in all of its disruptive power. But before she painted a single vulval-looking plate and even before she co-founded the groundbreaking Woman's Building in Los Angeles in 1973, Chicago had begun a serious career in L.A., making works that are prime examples of Finish Fetish, Light and Space and earthworks.
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May 16, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"Everything Loose Will Land" has landed. And its timing could hardly be better. The exhibition at the MAK Center in West Hollywood, curated by UCLA architectural historian and critic Sylvia Lavin, is a wry study of the ways Los Angeles artists and architects worked with, leaned on, stole from and influenced one another in the 1970s. In a larger sense, it charts the way Southern California architects threw off the influence of establishmen Modernism and helped remake the profession in that decade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
IN 1974, artist Judy Chicago launched a work in Los Angeles to redress ignorance of women's history. "The Dinner Party," an installation in the form of a banquet table commemorating important women, became an icon of the era. Now the work has a permanent home at the Brooklyn Museum, where it went on view this weekend at the new Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Here on the West Coast, other works by Chicago are part of "WACK!
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
You can never step in the same river twice, unless you're a performance artist working today. Artists who specialize in the most ephemeral, fleeting and hard-to-preserve visual art form are increasingly trying various ways to resurrect their earlier pieces and bring them to new audiences. And the 11-day Performance and Public Art Festival that starts Thursday in Los Angeles will be a big test of how effective their work can be when brought back to life in a different era. Funded primarily by the Getty as part of Pacific Standard Time — the museum-wide celebration of Southern California art history that started in October and runs into spring — the festival will revisit several memorable works done in the L.A. area in the late 1960s and '70s.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
Last year, two women were in an elevator in a Boston art museum. One looked at the other, quizzically. "Are you Judy Chicago?" "Yes." "I see." Chicago is the artist whose extraordinary and extraordinarily controversial work "The Dinner Party" features 39 oversized place settings on a huge triangle of a table, each dedicated to women of achievement, many of whom have been obscured by history's relentless focus on the attainments of men. Much of the imagery is unabashedly sexual.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2001 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a time when sports fans know as much about a player's performance asthey do about his agent's ability to negotiate a multiyear contract, it's appropriate that Judy Chicago is one of the most famous artists in America. A savvy game-player who knows the difference between public perception and behind-the-scenes deal-making, Chicago is not an artist in the old-fashioned sense of the term.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1990 | RICHARD MAHLER
One morning last July in the nation's capital, artist Judy Chicago stood in her work-out leotards outside a YMCA and scanned the headlines of a sidewalk newsstand. "There, on the front page of the Washington Times, was a color picture of me and 'The Dinner Party,' " said Chicago, referring to her controversial mixed-media tribute to prominent women of history. "I looked at it and went, 'Huh?' I didn't have a quarter with me so I couldn't even buy a copy."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is a regular contributor to Calendar
Toward the end of working on her "Holocaust Project" (1985-1993), Judy Chicago found herself perilously close to the heart of despair. "With my husband, Donald Woodman, a photographer, we spent eight years immersed in the darkness of the Holocaust," she says about the work, which combined his photography and her painting to convey the tragedy of that period of history. "It brought us face to face with a lot of things in the world that are deeply unjust and deeply disturbing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Jasmine Elist, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in the Age of Gaga it's still necessary to remind the world that female artists face barriers. Yes, women are free to wear a meat dress or express themselves in any artistic way imaginable, which is an important, tectonic shift from the rigidity of decades past — but they are still struggling to pierce the armor plating of art's most sacred institutions. According to feminist artist and educator Judy Chicago, only 3% to 5% of artwork on display in the permanent collections of most major museums is by a female artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even for legendary decades of change, the 1960s stands out, its impact felt around the world but especially in the Los Angeles art world. The '60s is the point when a number of factors converged that would transform L.A. from just another place that ambitious artists left when they moved to New York into a distinct and thriving art scene in its own right. At midcentury, as World War II was fading from immediate memory, the art associated with that traumatic period, Abstract Expressionism, had become the powerful and entrenched aesthetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
When Sheila de Bretteville was teaching graphic design at CalArts in the early 1970s, at a time when so much education was tailored to male students, she lobbied her male dean for the chance to devote her two days of teaching each week entirely to female students. Surprisingly, she says, he eventually relented. It fueled an admittedly utopian idea: What would it look like to start a center for feminist culture and education run by women for women where she didn't need permission from that dean?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
In the great game of word-image association that is art history, when people say Judy Chicago, they picture "The Dinner Party. " An installation with dozens of hand-painted table settings dedicated to important women throughout history, the 1970s work elicited impassioned debate, fast becoming a national symbol for feminist art in all of its disruptive power. But before she painted a single vulval-looking plate and even before she co-founded the groundbreaking Woman's Building in Los Angeles in 1973, Chicago had begun a serious career in L.A., making works that are prime examples of Finish Fetish, Light and Space and earthworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even for legendary decades of change, the 1960s stands out, its impact felt around the world but especially in the Los Angeles art world. The '60s is the point when a number of factors converged that would transform L.A. from just another place that ambitious artists left when they moved to New York into a distinct and thriving art scene in its own right. At midcentury, as World War II was fading from immediate memory, the art associated with that traumatic period, Abstract Expressionism, had become the powerful and entrenched aesthetic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Jasmine Elist, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even in the Age of Gaga it's still necessary to remind the world that female artists face barriers. Yes, women are free to wear a meat dress or express themselves in any artistic way imaginable, which is an important, tectonic shift from the rigidity of decades past — but they are still struggling to pierce the armor plating of art's most sacred institutions. According to feminist artist and educator Judy Chicago, only 3% to 5% of artwork on display in the permanent collections of most major museums is by a female artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
In 1966, Lynn Hershman Leeson, a pioneering multimedia artist, started filming people coming through her living room in Berkeley. She forgot about the footage until she came across it in storage in 2004 and became inspired to call attention to the work of these women who were attempting to discover their identities, addressing issues of social justice and civil rights and their role in creating a revolutionary feminist art. In her vibrant "!Women...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
IN 1974, artist Judy Chicago launched a work in Los Angeles to redress ignorance of women's history. "The Dinner Party," an installation in the form of a banquet table commemorating important women, became an icon of the era. Now the work has a permanent home at the Brooklyn Museum, where it went on view this weekend at the new Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Here on the West Coast, other works by Chicago are part of "WACK!
NEWS
March 4, 1990
Re "Inviting Help for 'Dinner Party' " (Feb. 7): the friends of Judy Chicago should use the $15,000 they collected to give her "Dinner Party" a decent burial. And, if there is room enough, dump in Judy, too, before she creates again. JOHN DEGATINA, Los Angeles
NEWS
July 19, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER
A LADDIE JOHN DILL FOR $90? A JUDY CHICAGO FOR $65? HAVE WE DIED AND GONE TO PIC 'N' SAVE HEAVEN?: No, we're still alive, and Pic 'N' Save is not dealing in ultra-fine art. But thanks to The Studio, a new art and jewelry gallery in Santa Monica, customers of modest means can afford to own authentic works by Dill, Chicago and other artists whose pieces typically cost tens of thousands of dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2001 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a time when sports fans know as much about a player's performance asthey do about his agent's ability to negotiate a multiyear contract, it's appropriate that Judy Chicago is one of the most famous artists in America. A savvy game-player who knows the difference between public perception and behind-the-scenes deal-making, Chicago is not an artist in the old-fashioned sense of the term.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is a regular contributor to Calendar
Toward the end of working on her "Holocaust Project" (1985-1993), Judy Chicago found herself perilously close to the heart of despair. "With my husband, Donald Woodman, a photographer, we spent eight years immersed in the darkness of the Holocaust," she says about the work, which combined his photography and her painting to convey the tragedy of that period of history. "It brought us face to face with a lot of things in the world that are deeply unjust and deeply disturbing.
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