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Judy Feeney

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November 13, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Feeney had been out of prison only two weeks and all he wanted to do was spend time with his family and rebuild his business. If anyone had told him he would go right back off on another risky foreign mission, the kind of high-adrenaline project that had landed him in an Iceland hoosegow in the first place, the fast-talking, Brooklyn-born Feeney would've laughed in his face. But when Connie Ghozzi walked through his door, neither Feeney nor his wife, Judy, could say no.
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NEWS
November 13, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Feeney had been out of prison only two weeks and all he wanted to do was spend time with his family and rebuild his business. If anyone had told him he would go right back off on another risky foreign mission, the kind of high-adrenaline project that had landed him in an Iceland hoosegow in the first place, the fast-talking, Brooklyn-born Feeney would've laughed in his face. But when Connie Ghozzi walked through his door, neither Feeney nor his wife, Judy, could say no.
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WORLD
June 11, 2009 | Ned Parker
The Iraqi police Wednesday released three of the five U.S. contractors who were detained last week in connection with the slaying last month of an American in Baghdad's Green Zone enclave, an Iraqi Interior Ministry official said. The men were freed on bail, but were forbidden to leave Iraq during the investigation of the death of Jim Kitterman, a 60-year-old construction contractor from Texas, said Rafae Munahe, a senior advisor to Interior Minister Jawad Bolani. "They cannot leave the country.
WORLD
June 12, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Five U.S. security contractors arrested in Baghdad have been cleared in the killing of a fellow American contractor, but two of them face drug-related charges, the Iraqi government said Thursday. Three of the U.S. contractors, and an Iraqi colleague arrested with them, will be released on bail and will still face charges of carrying unauthorized weapons and fake documents, government spokesman Ali Dabbagh said.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After living an episode worthy of an international espionage thriller, the Arcadia woman who was reunited with her 2-year-old son said Sunday that the bold rescue mission "was the scariest thing" she had ever gone through. Wired with microphones and tape recorders, Michelle Al-Nasseri, 23, had waited at London's Heathrow Airport while Scotland Yard agents and former Green Berets coaxed her son from her estranged husband's arms, minutes after the man's plane had landed.
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