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Judy Fiskin

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November 15, 1992 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA, Hunter Drohojowska is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis/Parsons School of Art and Design.
Judy Fiskin does not live in a dingbat. Nor does she live in a stucco box. Although such vernacular forms of Southern California architecture have often been the subject of her photographs, Fiskin lives in a respectable Spanish-style West L.A. house that once belonged to that avuncular character actor Guy Kibbee. Inside, the walls and sofas are very white, the tables made of warm, blond wood, the floors of red tile. Very tidy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Art Critic
Watching "Avatar," it's hard not to be struck by the utter strangeness of a fantastically complex high-tech movie that worships fervently at nature's mysterious altar. Digital primitivism is a peculiar faith, especially with 3-D glasses. Thirteen mostly recent, mostly large paintings by Mark Grotjahn at Blum & Poe knock that sort of faith upside the head. Emphatically handmade, with layer upon layer of pigment built up with brushes and palette knives on cardboard sheets affixed to canvas, they wear their secrets on their sleeve.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"My Trip to New York" records a journey by photographer Judy Fiskin on which she saw no monuments or tourist attractions, only modest houses in ordinary neighborhoods. That's hardly a surprise, for Fiskin has previously distinguished herself by focusing on California's "dingbat" houses. In this new suite she sets forth Eastern dwellings as 2-inch-square black-and-white images, printed with black outlines in the center of large white rectangles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA, Hunter Drohojowska is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis/Parsons School of Art and Design.
Judy Fiskin does not live in a dingbat. Nor does she live in a stucco box. Although such vernacular forms of Southern California architecture have often been the subject of her photographs, Fiskin lives in a respectable Spanish-style West L.A. house that once belonged to that avuncular character actor Guy Kibbee. Inside, the walls and sofas are very white, the tables made of warm, blond wood, the floors of red tile. Very tidy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 15 black-and-white gelatin silver prints, Judy Fiskin continues her ongoing project to explore the culturally ambiguous structure of art. Numbered among the photographs at Asher-Faure Gallery in West Hollywood are some of the most compelling this gifted artist has made. Fiskin's now-familiar format--a black and white image, 2 3/4 inches square, crisply printed inside a much larger field of white--is crucial to the success of her enterprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
In the early 1980s, photographer Judy Fiskin used to spend her days driving around Los Angeles neighborhoods looking for homely stucco apartment buildings built in the 1950s and '60s. When she spotted one, out came a notebook to record important facts--the street-cleaning schedule, and the position of the house relative to the sun. Then she'd come back with her camera to make a bunch of very tiny, very plain photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Art Critic
Watching "Avatar," it's hard not to be struck by the utter strangeness of a fantastically complex high-tech movie that worships fervently at nature's mysterious altar. Digital primitivism is a peculiar faith, especially with 3-D glasses. Thirteen mostly recent, mostly large paintings by Mark Grotjahn at Blum & Poe knock that sort of faith upside the head. Emphatically handmade, with layer upon layer of pigment built up with brushes and palette knives on cardboard sheets affixed to canvas, they wear their secrets on their sleeve.
NEWS
July 30, 1992
Philip Orlando, 69, who with his partner, Robert Gino, began an art gallery in the San Fernando Valley more than 30 years ago. The Orlando Gallery, which grew out of a dance studio the men had started earlier, gained a reputation for giving first shows to artists who later became prominent, among them photographers Jo Ann Challis, Bob Heineken and Judy Fiskin and painter Peter Alexander.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1997
Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions will hold its 18th annual benefit art auction Nov. 15 at 8 p.m. at Sotheby's Los Angeles showroom, 9665 Wilshire Blvd. Proceeds will go toward LACE's programming. Artists donating works include Llyn Foulkes, Catherine Opie, Renee Petropoulos, Raymond Pettibon, William Wegman, Uta Barth, John Baldessari, Judy Fiskin, Richard Hawkins and Jim Iserman. Tickets are $75 and the event includes cocktails, a light supper and dessert.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2008 | Diane Haithman
The MOCA Mobilization, a Facebook group banded in support of L.A.'s financially strapped Museum of Contemporary Art, recently used its Facebook page as a tool to draw about 450 people to the Geffen Contemporary for a rally intended to draw attention to the problems that threaten the existence of the museum. Now, the group -- led by a committee including artists Cindy Bernard, Diana Thater, Judy Fiskin and Mark Pally -- has launched a letter-writing campaign to encourage the public to contact Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, MOCA trustees and city officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
In the early 1980s, photographer Judy Fiskin used to spend her days driving around Los Angeles neighborhoods looking for homely stucco apartment buildings built in the 1950s and '60s. When she spotted one, out came a notebook to record important facts--the street-cleaning schedule, and the position of the house relative to the sun. Then she'd come back with her camera to make a bunch of very tiny, very plain photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 15 black-and-white gelatin silver prints, Judy Fiskin continues her ongoing project to explore the culturally ambiguous structure of art. Numbered among the photographs at Asher-Faure Gallery in West Hollywood are some of the most compelling this gifted artist has made. Fiskin's now-familiar format--a black and white image, 2 3/4 inches square, crisply printed inside a much larger field of white--is crucial to the success of her enterprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | KRISTINE McKENNA
L.A. photographer Judy Fiskin is a former art history major whose way of seeing was shaped by years spent peering at minuscule reproductions of art. She makes very tiny black and white pictures which she mounts in austere white frames and presents in clustered bouquets. There's great delicacy to Fiskin's presentation and her work looks rather innocuous at a glance, but these images have a terrific cumulative power.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1995
Otis College of Art and Design kicks off a new lecture series Jan. 10 with a critics' panel including Los Angeles Times Art Critic Christopher Knight, Village Voice writer Peter Schjeldahl and Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe of Art Center. The series, called "Just What Do You Think You're Doing?" will be held at Sotheby's, 9665 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. All sessions begin at 8 p.m. and will be moderated by art critic David Pagel. Following the initial critics panel will be a curators' panel on Jan.
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