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BUSINESS
April 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Top TV Agent Enters Management Business: Gavin Polone, a top television agent who was fired earlier this week by United Talent Agency in a highly publicized feud, will join former colleague Judy Hofflund in forming Hofflund/Palone, a new management partnership.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Top TV Agent Enters Management Business: Gavin Polone, a top television agent who was fired earlier this week by United Talent Agency in a highly publicized feud, will join former colleague Judy Hofflund in forming Hofflund/Palone, a new management partnership.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY
Interviews don't come easy to Michael Ovitz. Even in his private sanctum, flanked by a pair of colleagues, safe beneath the dual gaze of Buddha and Marilyn Monroe--totemic bits of art on a movie maker's wall--the sandy-haired president of Creative Artists Agency is wary and tense and never stops wishing the limelight would go away. "This is not a comfortable experience for any of us," he says, his hoarse voice so low a reporter's recorder barely registers. "We really function behind the scenes.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER
A decade ago, Bill Block was considered one of the hottest young agents in Hollywood and certainly one of the most ambitious. With slicked-back hair, trademark black attire and fast-talk hustle, he fit the part well. He practically pioneered the agent's use of the telephone headset and rarely missed a Monday night at Mortons. "He did the game better than anybody," says pal and former associate Jeremy Zimmer, an agent and partner at United Talent Agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Satirizing beauty contests is hardly new--Michael Ritchie's "Smile" did it brilliantly back in 1975--but since they're still around they remain ripe targets, as demonstrated with dark hilarity in "Drop Dead Gorgeous." Occasionally heavy-handed and overdone--and scarcely free from a self-congratulatory tone--this latest spoof is nonetheless lots of fun, clever and fearless, and loaded with wicked lines and touches.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Timing may be everything, but it's also a funny thing. How else to explain why "Stir of Echoes," in which a little boy sees dead people, should open at a time when the biggest movie in the country is about a little boy who sees dead people? But the reason "Stir of Echoes" works as well as it does has nothing to do with any similarities to "The Sixth Sense"--or to "The Shining," Poe's "The Black Cat" or even the infamous Glen Ridge, N.J.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | ALAN CITRON
Some civilizations turn historic places into shrines to good or evil. Others merely redecorate them and move on, which helps explain how United Talent Agency came to occupy the sweeping Beverly Hills office that junk bond kingpin Michael Milken lorded over in the 1980s. UTA signed a lease on the space just one day after Drexel Burnham Lambert abandoned ship.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tremors rocked the entertainment industry over the weekend as one Hollywood talent agency was sold, another prepared to go out of business and a third announced a management buyout. The William Morris Agency purchased Triad Artists, whose clients include actor Bruce Willis and country music star Vince Gill, for an undisclosed sum. At the same time, several top executives have left InterTalent in anticipation of the company's demise.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's called a panic room," the snarky real estate person says to prospective house buyer Meg Altman (Jodie Foster). It's the modern version of the castle keep, a specially equipped spot with a door of steel designed to be a refuge when burglars invade your space. Because they can't get in, you feel safe. If only it were that simple.
REAL ESTATE
November 30, 1997 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress BROOKE SHIELDS and her husband, tennis star ANDRE AGASSI, have purchased a Pacific Palisades home for a bit more than $3 million, sources say. The couple also have a home in Las Vegas that Agassi bought for about $2 million just before he and Shields were married in April, and he also owns a compound in a gated development in Las Vegas, his hometown. Shields, 32, stars in the NBC sitcom "Suddenly Susan," now in its second season. Agassi, 27, won the 1996 U.S.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity the poor Hollywood agent. In the '80s and early '90s, talent agents ruled the industry. Movie studios and television networks found themselves beholden to International Creative Management, the Creative Artists Agency and the time-tested William Morris Agency, the "big three" agencies that had a lock on most A-list stars. Agents made big money for both their clients and themselves, charging the TV networks, for example, huge so-called packaging fees to assemble talent for shows.
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