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Judy Olian

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BUSINESS
August 28, 2011 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Judy Olian is dean of the UCLA Anderson School of Management. With nearly 2,000 students in full-time and executive MBA programs, as well as PhD candidates, Anderson is ranked the 14th-best business school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. A native Australian, Olian, 59, is one of the few female business school deans in the country. Two tough women: Olian attributes her tenacity to her mother, Rachel, a teacher who was separated from her husband in Poland during the Holocaust, only to be reunited with him seven years later in Australia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Debate continued Thursday over the upcoming switch that will end any state funding for UCLA's MBA program and make it dependent on tuition and donations. UC system President Mark G. Yudof this week approved the plan with some measures to ensure the program remains under UC control.  The proposal for financial "self-support"  was advocated for nearly three years by leaders of the UCLA Anderson School of Management, but critics contend it is a step toward privatization of a public university.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The UCLA Anderson School of Management said Thursday that it had appointed Pennsylvania State University business school Dean Judy Olian to lead the school. As dean of Pennsylvania State's Smeal College of Business since 2000, Olian oversaw the school's undergraduate, MBA and PhD programs, UCLA Chancellor Albert Carnesale said. She led a fundraising campaign for a $68-million facility for the school that opened this summer. "Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
UC President Mark G. Yudof has approved a controversial plan to turn UCLA's MBA program into a self-supporting unit that depends wholly on tuition without state funding. The approval comes after nearly three years of debate over what critics alleged was an attempt to privatize part of a public university. But the final version is much less ambitious than the original proposal and keeps the UCLA master's degree in business administration, which enrolls about 720 students, firmly under central UC control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Debate continued Thursday over the upcoming switch that will end any state funding for UCLA's MBA program and make it dependent on tuition and donations. UC system President Mark G. Yudof this week approved the plan with some measures to ensure the program remains under UC control.  The proposal for financial "self-support"  was advocated for nearly three years by leaders of the UCLA Anderson School of Management, but critics contend it is a step toward privatization of a public university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
UC President Mark G. Yudof has approved a controversial plan to turn UCLA's MBA program into a self-supporting unit that depends wholly on tuition without state funding. The approval comes after nearly three years of debate over what critics alleged was an attempt to privatize part of a public university. But the final version is much less ambitious than the original proposal and keeps the UCLA master's degree in business administration, which enrolls about 720 students, firmly under central UC control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UCLA faculty leaders on Thursday narrowly approved a controversial plan to wean the campus' signature MBA program off state funding and have it survive on tuition and donations. The move was viewed by many around UC as a possible turning point in how California's public universities should respond to years of state budget cuts. Some said the proposed change at the Anderson School of Management's full-time MBA program may start a trend, particularly among business and law schools that are able to charge high fees and have wealthy alumni to help support them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UCLA's controversial plan to end state funding for the main MBA program at its management school and instead support it with tuition and donations has hit a significant roadblock that will at least delay the proposal. A powerful committee of the UC system's faculty senate recently voted to suspend its review of the Anderson School of Management's plan and raised questions about the proposal's budget, its effect on educational quality and affordability for students, and possible undue influence by donors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The University of California system's two top leaders on Tuesday rejected a politically controversial demand by some of the university's most highly paid employees that they should receive larger pensions, based on a percentage of their total salaries, not on just the first $245,000. The dispute comes weeks after UC bolstered its long underfunded retirement plans by cutting benefits for all employees and raising the minimum retirement age from 50 to 55 for those hired after 2013.
OPINION
January 7, 2011
A group of highly paid executives at the University of California has adopted an unseemly attitude best described as "gimme, gimme. " Although each of them already earns at least $245,000 a year, along with generous pension benefits, they're threatening to sue if the university, which has imposed hefty tuition increases on its students over the past two years, doesn't give them more. The Board of Regents clearly intended, back in 1999, to give its highest-paid administrators a retirement boost by asking the Internal Revenue Service to lift a cap on pension benefits for those earning the biggest salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UCLA faculty leaders on Thursday narrowly approved a controversial plan to wean the campus' signature MBA program off state funding and have it survive on tuition and donations. The move was viewed by many around UC as a possible turning point in how California's public universities should respond to years of state budget cuts. Some said the proposed change at the Anderson School of Management's full-time MBA program may start a trend, particularly among business and law schools that are able to charge high fees and have wealthy alumni to help support them.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2011 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Judy Olian is dean of the UCLA Anderson School of Management. With nearly 2,000 students in full-time and executive MBA programs, as well as PhD candidates, Anderson is ranked the 14th-best business school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. A native Australian, Olian, 59, is one of the few female business school deans in the country. Two tough women: Olian attributes her tenacity to her mother, Rachel, a teacher who was separated from her husband in Poland during the Holocaust, only to be reunited with him seven years later in Australia.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The UCLA Anderson School of Management said Thursday that it had appointed Pennsylvania State University business school Dean Judy Olian to lead the school. As dean of Pennsylvania State's Smeal College of Business since 2000, Olian oversaw the school's undergraduate, MBA and PhD programs, UCLA Chancellor Albert Carnesale said. She led a fundraising campaign for a $68-million facility for the school that opened this summer. "Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2013 | By Meg James
Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger was honored with the UCLA Anderson School of Management John Wooden Global Leadership Award during an evening that celebrated impressive records. At the UCLA gala Thursday night at the Beverly Hilton, Iger's won-loss record was compared to that of the legendary UCLA basketball coach, who posted a 620-147 record in his 27 years at the helm. Since Iger took the reins of the Burbank entertainment giant in 2005, the value of Disney's stock has tripled.
OPINION
September 15, 2010 | By Jason Ball and Lincoln Ellis
Understandable as the University of California's precarious budget situation is, raising tuition to the level of private universities for specific programs is unacceptable. We see problems with both the process and the substance of the drastic proposal to essentially privatize the UCLA Anderson School of Management and charge $50,000 for in-state tuition, as reported on Sept. 9 by The Times. On the process side, we expect administrators to involve students in the decisions that shape students' lives, especially a decision of this magnitude.
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