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Judy Schwabacher

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991
The founder and head of Lancaster's embattled art acquisition program, artist Judy Schwabacher, angrily quit her post Wednesday night and the program was sent back to the drawing board. Saying that she had been the subject of "ugly lies" and had been victimized by "unprofessional and unethical" city officials, Schwabacher resigned from the program that had been created last year to solicit art works for Lancaster's public buildings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991
The founder and head of Lancaster's embattled art acquisition program, artist Judy Schwabacher, angrily quit her post Wednesday night and the program was sent back to the drawing board. Saying that she had been the subject of "ugly lies" and had been victimized by "unprofessional and unethical" city officials, Schwabacher resigned from the program that had been created last year to solicit art works for Lancaster's public buildings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The founder and head of Lancaster's embattled art acquisition program, local artist Judy Schwabacher, angrily quit her post Wednesday night and the program was sent back to the drawing board. Saying that she had been the subject of "ugly lies" and had been victimized by "unprofessional and unethical" city officials, Schwabacher resigned from the program that had been created last year to solicit art works for Lancaster's public buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The founder and head of Lancaster's embattled art acquisition program, local artist Judy Schwabacher, angrily quit her post Wednesday night and the program was sent back to the drawing board. Saying that she had been the subject of "ugly lies" and had been victimized by "unprofessional and unethical" city officials, Schwabacher resigned from the program that had been created last year to solicit art works for Lancaster's public buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster, once a sleepy desert outpost, is now a city of 100,000 with a burden of big city problems--drugs, the homeless, overdevelopment, corruption, crowded schools and even gangs. Just when it seemed Lancaster had confronted all the usual metropolitan woes comes a new one: art wars. Lancaster's first attempt to institute a public art program to put donated paintings in city-owned buildings has broken down amid battles over who controls the program and chooses the art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster, once a sleepy desert outpost, is now a city of 100,000 with a burden of big city problems--drugs, the homeless, overdevelopment, corruption, crowded schools and even gangs. But just when it seemed that Lancaster had confronted all the usual metropolitan woes comes a new one: Art wars. Lancaster's first attempt to institute a public art program to put donated paintings in city-owned buildings has broken down amid battles over who controls the program and chooses the art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER
The Lancaster City Council has voted 4 to 1 to disband the city's Parks, Recreation and Arts Commission, a five-member advisory panel that has been dogged by controversies and a lack of clout at City Hall. Councilman Frank Roberts, who prefers temporary, council-appointed ad-hoc committees to deal with specific tasks, sought the change Monday night. Mayor George Root cast the lone dissenting vote. The council is set to take a final vote on disbanding the commission in two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster, once a sleepy desert outpost, is now a city of 100,000 with a burden of big city problems--drugs, the homeless, overdevelopment, corruption, crowded schools and even gangs. Just when it seemed Lancaster had confronted all the usual metropolitan woes comes a new one: art wars. Lancaster's first attempt to institute a public art program to put donated paintings in city-owned buildings has broken down amid battles over who controls the program and chooses the art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster, once a sleepy desert outpost, is now a city of 100,000 with a burden of big city problems--drugs, the homeless, overdevelopment, corruption, crowded schools and even gangs. But just when it seemed that Lancaster had confronted all the usual metropolitan woes comes a new one: Art wars. Lancaster's first attempt to institute a public art program to put donated paintings in city-owned buildings has broken down amid battles over who controls the program and chooses the art.
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