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Juergen Hippenstiel Imhausen

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May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
Authorities today arrested the former head of a West German company at the center of a scandal involving a suspected chemical weapons plant in Libya. West German and U.S. authorities alleged that the company, Imhausen-Chemie, was the key supplier of material for the plant in the Libyan city of Rabta. Libya claimed that the plant was for making pharmaceuticals, but U.S. and West German officials claim that it was intended to manufacture chemical weapons. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, who was chief of Imhausen-Chemie until March, was arrested in the city of Bochum, said prosecutor Holger Preisendanz, who is leading the probe into the case.
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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A West German businessman was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison on Wednesday for helping Libya build a plant the court said was "clearly intended" to produce chemical weapons. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, described by prosecutors as a "merchant of death," was found guilty by a state court in Mannheim of violating West German export laws. He was also found guilty on charges of tax evasion of $11.7 million.
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NEWS
May 11, 1989
The former chairman of a West German firm alleged to have helped Libya make a suspected chemical weapons plant has been arrested, the Mannheim prosecutor's office said. A spokesman said Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen of the Imhausen chemical company was seized in the town of Bochum on suspicion of offenses against export laws. Imhausen-Chemie and several other West German firms are under investigation on suspicion of evading export laws to help Libya build a factory at Rabta. Libya has said the plant will make only medicines, but the United States and other Western governments believe it was designed to make poison gas. Hippenstiel-Imhausen resigned in March, saying he hoped this would help to clear up the affair.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A controversial factory in Libya damaged by fire last week was designed solely for making chemical weapons, West Germany said Thursday after an official investigation. The public prosecutor's office in Mannheim also said in a statement that a West German businessman was indicted on charges he helped build the Libyan plant, which the United States has insisted produced chemical weapons.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A West German businessman was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison on Wednesday for helping Libya build a plant the court said was "clearly intended" to produce chemical weapons. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, described by prosecutors as a "merchant of death," was found guilty by a state court in Mannheim of violating West German export laws. He was also found guilty on charges of tax evasion of $11.7 million.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A controversial factory in Libya damaged by fire last week was designed solely for making chemical weapons, West Germany said Thursday after an official investigation. The public prosecutor's office in Mannheim also said in a statement that a West German businessman was indicted on charges he helped build the Libyan plant, which the United States has insisted produced chemical weapons.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German customs police staged raids Wednesday on the offices of three companies and the homes of a dozen executives and found evidence of their involvement in supplying an alleged chemical weapons plant in Libya, according to the prosecutor in charge of the investigation.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The director of a chemical company accused of helping Libya build a suspected poison gas plant was found unconscious in his car after attempting suicide, police said today. Hans Renner, the 60-year-old executive director of the embattled Imhausen-Chemie firm, was discovered by forestry workers at 12:30 p.m. Thursday after he had consumed something apparently intended to kill him, said a Lahr Police Department spokesman, Emil Roth.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
A court today convicted a West German industrialist of helping Libya build a plant that Western officials say was intended to produce poison gas. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, described by prosecutors as a "merchant of death," was found guilty of violating export laws and tax evasion. He was sentenced to five years in prison for his involvement in construction of the widely publicized plant in the Libyan city of Rabta, south of Tripoli.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that damaged the global image of German business and deeply embarrassed the government, a regional court sentenced three chemical-company executives to jail terms Wednesday for their roles in illegally exporting to Libya components of a factory capable of producing poison gas.
NEWS
May 11, 1989
The former chairman of a West German firm alleged to have helped Libya make a suspected chemical weapons plant has been arrested, the Mannheim prosecutor's office said. A spokesman said Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen of the Imhausen chemical company was seized in the town of Bochum on suspicion of offenses against export laws. Imhausen-Chemie and several other West German firms are under investigation on suspicion of evading export laws to help Libya build a factory at Rabta. Libya has said the plant will make only medicines, but the United States and other Western governments believe it was designed to make poison gas. Hippenstiel-Imhausen resigned in March, saying he hoped this would help to clear up the affair.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
Authorities today arrested the former head of a West German company at the center of a scandal involving a suspected chemical weapons plant in Libya. West German and U.S. authorities alleged that the company, Imhausen-Chemie, was the key supplier of material for the plant in the Libyan city of Rabta. Libya claimed that the plant was for making pharmaceuticals, but U.S. and West German officials claim that it was intended to manufacture chemical weapons. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, who was chief of Imhausen-Chemie until March, was arrested in the city of Bochum, said prosecutor Holger Preisendanz, who is leading the probe into the case.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German customs police staged raids Wednesday on the offices of three companies and the homes of a dozen executives and found evidence of their involvement in supplying an alleged chemical weapons plant in Libya, according to the prosecutor in charge of the investigation.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of the Persian Gulf War, Chancellor Helmut Kohl's newly constituted government Monday moved to further tighten controls on the country's controversial export policy. A high-level working group from several ministries met in the chancellory to discuss strengthening existing measures to monitor goods shipped to the Middle East and the Third World. A toughening of punishment for businesses that skirt the restrictions is also likely, government officials said.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
West German financial examiners found no proof to support U.S. allegations that a West German firm helped build a plant in Libya designed to produce chemical weapons, officials said today. The announcement ended an investigation of the Imhausen-Chemie company in southwest Baden-Wurttemberg state. The federal Finance Ministry ordered the company's records examined in response to the U.S. claims.
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