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February 14, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
For those who have witnessed their act--at the old Renaissance Pleasure Faire, for instance, or the 1984 Olympic Arts Festival--The Flying Karamazov Brothers are to juggling what Ty Cobb was to baseball or Orson Welles was to movie making: Performers who turn craft into artistry, and then push that art quantum leaps.
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SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
As it turns out, we all got the question wrong. How would the Dodgers split playing time among four outfielders? By the time the Dodgers finally got their four headline outfielders healthy at the same time, they had decided to split time among five outfielders. For now, the Dodgers have a stable outfield rotation. If they face a right-hander, the outfield consists of Carl Crawford, Andre Ethier, and either Matt Kemp or Yasiel Puig. If they face a left-hander, the outfield consists of Kemp, Puig and Scott Van Slyke.
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SPORTS
February 1, 1986
The Super Bowl is slowly but surely losing its attraction as a major sporting event and gaining more and more recognition as general entertainment. NFL championships used to be snow, blood, mud and beer. Now they are music videos, political advertisements, sushi and bathtub margaritas. I admit this letter is in vain. So I suggest to keep the spirit, the people who run professional sports (ABC, NBC and CBS) add to their coverage by giving the majority of the audience (I dare not call them fans)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Gillian Anderson did the unthinkable when she achieved pop culture fame as skeptical FBI agent Dana Scully in the landmark "The X-Files. " When the series ended in 2002 after nine seasons, she walked away from American television, moved to London and began taking on a variety of smaller-scale theater and film projects. Now, a year after the 20th anniversary of the start of "The X-Files," Anderson is more visible than ever in three TV series. She stars in BBC Two's "The Fall" as a senior police detective investigating serial murders, and NBC's "Crisis," in which she plays the chief executive of an international IT conglomerate whose daughter is kidnapped.
NEWS
December 28, 2006 | Brenda Rees, Special to The Times
ON a chilly Monday night, kids and adults hurry up the stairs to a 1920s gym in South Pasadena where the waxed floor is littered with an assortment of juggling balls, rings, pins and even unicycles. There's a bit of organized commotion as folks find equipment, grab a buddy and start the evening's fun. Standing in a circle with four youngsters is Bryan Langholz, a biostatistician at USC who comes here religiously to spread the gospel of gravity. "Let's go!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some gym teachers want their charges to learn how to finesse a soccer ball. Some want them to learn how to sink a basket. Jean Flemion, of A.E. Wright Middle School in Calabasas, advocates a kinder, gentler physical education. He teaches his students how to juggle. "Every year we have 600 kids who will learn," Flemion said. "That's the entire sixth grade." Flemion, 54, who added juggling to the curriculum in the mid-1980s, estimates he has taught 7,000 youngsters and more than 3,000 teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1997 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The spinning, throwing, laughing jugglers out celebrating their friendships and their sense of fun made it all look easy Sunday. Gathered in Irvine Regional Park near Orange to mark what the International Jugglers Assn. has dubbed World Juggling Day, they hurled clubs and balls into the air and juggled everything from tops to objects called feather sticks at astonishing rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some gym teachers want their charges to learn how to finesse a soccer ball. Some want them to learn how to sink a basket. Jean Flemion, of A.E. Wright Middle School in Calabasas, advocates a kinder, gentler physical education. He teaches all his students how to juggle. "Every year we have 600 kids who will learn," Flemion said. "That's the entire sixth grade."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1995 | GLENN DOGGRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pundits can debate whether the world has become too weird, but when chain-saw jugglers need a gimmick to set them apart from the crowd, it's clear what direction things are headed. "People would always ask if we do chain saws. That sticks in their mind as the ultimate juggling prop," Jon Wee, of the Passing Zone juggling duo, said by phone last week from Decorah, Iowa, where he and Owen Morse were performing at Luther College and enjoying an old friend's hospitality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michelle Gerdes started juggling 13 years ago because her doctor said it would help maintain her peripheral vision, which was being slowly lost due to a condition weakening her eye muscles. "It helps out my eyes a lot," said Gerdes, 34, of Long Beach. "Now I know a great bunch of jugglers, and I married one of them." Gerdes met her husband Steve while juggling with friends at Hermosa Beach in 1985. They married soon after, incorporating a juggling performance into their wedding ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By David Ng
Shakespeare's "Henry V" begins with a narrator called the Chorus bemoaning the theater as "an unworthy scaffold. " The description turns out to be an accurate one for the Pacific Resident Theatre production, which takes place in a cramped, 34-seat space where actors and audience can practically touch hands without much strain. The tiny theater turns out to be a major asset in this production, which has been earning critical praise since opening last month, and has extended its run to May 11. Featuring minimal sets and actors clad in contemporary clothes, this fast-paced staging was the brainchild of Guillermo Cienfuegos, a veteran L.A. theater director who has worked numerous times with the Venice-based PRT. PHOTOS: Shakespeare 2.0 The bard on the screen Cienfuegos is actually actor Alex Fernandez, who pulls double duty in this "Henry V" by playing the Chorus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By David Colker
Before Wes Anderson directed his first feature film, he'd hang out at an eclectic coffee shop in Dallas where he met a 70-something yoga teacher - Kumar Pallana - who was like a one-man Ed Sullivan variety show. To entertain customers in the cafe owned by his son, Pallana would juggle, do magic tricks and perform a vaudeville staple: plate spinning. Anderson and his buddy, actor-writer Owen Wilson, made Pallana an offer. "They said they were shooting a movie and 'Are you interested in being in it?
OPINION
September 30, 2013 | By Rosalind C. Barnett and Caryl Rivers
It's back-to-school time and parents' worries abound. Will the new teacher be any good? Will my child have friends in the new class? Will budget cuts limit the offerings in art, music or sports? There's one worry that's universal: Are my kids safe after school? The combination of shorter school days and the lack of after-school child care creates a mismatch for many full-time employed parents, especially mothers. Imagine that you have a child whose school day ends at 2 p.m. but you don't get home until 6 p.m. or later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By David Zahniser
Amid his first big political battle as Los Angeles mayor, Navy Lt. Eric Garcetti will have to juggle summer duty as a military intelligence officer over the coming weeks. Mayoral spokesman Yusef Robb said Monday that Garcetti has begun two weeks of training as a member of the Navy Reserve - a stint that will send him to a facility in the city of Bell and possibly other locations in Southern California during a portion of each workday. The training comes as council members are growing increasingly vocal about wanting a salary deal with the union that represents Department of Water and Power employees by the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Romantic entanglements among young, attractive, progressive urbanites inform so many indie films and TV series that it's a relief to see that springboard so definitively turned on its ear. The result is "The Happy Sad," an engaging look at a pair of New York couples whose love lives intersect, crisscross, circle and backtrack in hip and provocative ways. Marcus (LeRoy McClain) and Aaron (Charlie Barnett of TV's "Chicago Fire") are an African American couple who, after six seemingly solid years together, decide to test an open relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Character actor Donal Logue is performing the tricky but enviable task of juggling roles in three cable series - BBC America's "Copper," the History Channel's "Vikings" and "Sons of Anarchy" on FX. He talked about the series that's currently on the air, "Copper," a day before flying to Ireland to film "Vikings. " Let's start with "Copper. " Is it true that you went after the role of ward boss Brendan Donovan? No, "Copper" was something quite unexpected, literally a phone call on a Tuesday afternoon before I started shooting on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He survived eight years of juggling chain saws at Venice Beach without suffering as much as a scratch. It's the three years that Robert W. Gruenberg Jr. allegedly juggled numbers on his tax returns that could end up costing him an arm and a leg. A federal grand jury has indicted the famed boardwalk performer for filing false tax returns and failing to report nearly $63,000 in income in 1984, 1985 and 1986 from his one-of-a-kind juggling act, officials said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | MATHIS CHAZANOV
Even the Venice Beach chain saw guy is not immune to mid-career crisis. After 11 years of parlaying his stupid human trick into a modest level of renown, Robert Gruenberg is putting away the Sears Craftsman. Off it will go into the garage (his landlady thinks he's in the gardening business), along with the bowling balls and a five-foot-long fake fish, all props for a wacky juggler who has long been a mainstay of the grungy stretch of beachfront tourist attractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
The people behind the "Payday" video game franchise have a lot going on. They're making a movie based on "Payday: The Heist," the 2011 cult hit video game, for 2014. The game's sequel is coming out in August, and they're now working on the third installment. Plus there's a Web series. Video games as source material for films is not new. What's different about these projects is that the video game makers and the filmmakers are working together throughout the process. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Juggling all those projects means taking multiple angles on the same intellectual property and thinking in ways filmmakers typically haven't, said Greg O'Connor, producer of the upcoming "Payday: The Heist" film.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
Vaudevillian elements notwithstanding, the absurdist theater isn't typically associated with slam-bang entertainment value. Based on the works of Eugene Ionesco, “Ionescopade” at the Odyssey brings slapstick firmly to the fore in a surprisingly light-hearted divertissement. Yet in fine Ionesco style, the general inanity yields horrific hints of a world gone mad. Director/choreographer William Castellino, working with longtime collaborator Mildred Kayden (music and lyrics)
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