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Jule Styne

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NEWS
September 21, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jule Styne, who was not born in this country but became one of the most prolific contributors to its singular offering to the arts--the Broadway musical--died Tuesday in New York City. Styne, who won an Oscar and a Tony, had at his death composed more than 1,500 tunes, many from such widely heralded shows as "Gypsy," "Funny Girl" and "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." He was 88. He had been hospitalized for the last six weeks after undergoing open-heart surgery at Mt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When the heroine of the topical 1956 diversion "Bells Are Ringing" tells a Marlon Brando wannabe to knock off the Brando act because "there's a glut on the market," she might as well be talking about Broadway musical revivals, circa 2001. At the moment, Broadway has nine of them, ranging from "Annie Get Your Gun" to "The Rocky Horror Show." The latest second-time-around hopeful is "Bells Are Ringing," a project originally announced for a tryout at the Pasadena Playhouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
"The great gift of this show is seeing people who I've worked with over 50 years and knowing I'm still here," composer Jule Styne said of taking part in a public-television special focusing on his long and illustrious career. The two-hour program, "Broadway Sings: The Music of Jule Styne," is scheduled to be seen on "Great Performances" at 8 tonight on KCET Channel 28 in Los Angeles. It also airs Friday at 8 p.m. on (24) and at 9 p.m. on (15), and Saturday at 9:15 p.m. (50).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2000
American-made musical theater, especially the rare contemporary kind that dares to entertain like "The Scarlet Pimpernel," has never been a "guilty pleasure" for me ("This Time, He's Dressed to Kill," April 30). Jan Breslauer's cheerfully spun report on a tuner kept alive by audience affection and, evidently, constructive rewrites may only err in leaving the impression--"boffo box office"--that it is finally turning a profit. Despite non-fatal second-act overwriting, I found the "4.0" version (the only one I've seen)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1993 | SUSAN REITER, Susan Reiter is a free-lance writer based in New York. and
From the start, the 1948 British film "The Red Shoes"--an expansive saga of the passionate and obsessive people who make up the fictitious Ballet Lermontov--has captivated people who might otherwise never have ventured near a ballet performance. Cinematically adventurous for its day, astutely cast, it weaves together a grim Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale and the realistic on- and off-stage activities of a touring ballet troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2000
American-made musical theater, especially the rare contemporary kind that dares to entertain like "The Scarlet Pimpernel," has never been a "guilty pleasure" for me ("This Time, He's Dressed to Kill," April 30). Jan Breslauer's cheerfully spun report on a tuner kept alive by audience affection and, evidently, constructive rewrites may only err in leaving the impression--"boffo box office"--that it is finally turning a profit. Despite non-fatal second-act overwriting, I found the "4.0" version (the only one I've seen)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It dazzles everyone, even those who have seen it all. "Of all the events I've attended," a White House Marine guard said, nervously adjusting the cuffs of his military tuxedo as he gazed at the celebrity-studded crowd in the East Room--"this is really it." This last weekend, as it has for the last 13 years, Washington dressed up and turned out to honor five Americans whose cultural achievements have earned them a place in the nation's heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
It showed how thoroughly Dodgermania had spread when two women, sitting in the San Gabriel Civic Auditorium last Sunday, spent the last minutes before the curtain rose on "Gypsy" by watching the World Series on their micro TV. How could the San Gabriel Valley Civic Light Opera's "Gypsy" top the Dodgers? Try Jo Anne Worley as Rose. Then, for good measure, add Lauren Hathaway as Louise/Gypsy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | DAVID FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood came calling with some of its biggest names: Barbra Streisand, Bette Midler, Madonna. But Broadway said "no." "Not for all the money in the world will we let them make another film version of 'Gypsy,' " said playwright Arthur Laurents. The first time Hollywood filmed the Broadway musical, it was "lousy," said composer Jule Styne, referring to the 1962 Warner Bros. adaptation that starred Rosalind Russell and Natalie Wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | MARTIN GOTTFRIED, Martin Gottfried is the author of the forthcoming biography, "Bob Fosse And All That Jazz," to be published by Bantam Books. His "Broadway Musicals" was published by Harry N. Abrams Co.) and
Change comes in waves, first as experiment, then as daring, finally affecting the way things are and settling into common use. Then another wave of change comes along. This is the pattern in most things and it is the pattern in the theater.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jule Styne, who was not born in this country but became one of the most prolific contributors to its singular offering to the arts--the Broadway musical--died Tuesday in New York City. Styne, who won an Oscar and a Tony, had at his death composed more than 1,500 tunes, many from such widely heralded shows as "Gypsy," "Funny Girl" and "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." He was 88. He had been hospitalized for the last six weeks after undergoing open-heart surgery at Mt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1993 | SUSAN REITER, Susan Reiter is a free-lance writer based in New York. and
From the start, the 1948 British film "The Red Shoes"--an expansive saga of the passionate and obsessive people who make up the fictitious Ballet Lermontov--has captivated people who might otherwise never have ventured near a ballet performance. Cinematically adventurous for its day, astutely cast, it weaves together a grim Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale and the realistic on- and off-stage activities of a touring ballet troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It dazzles everyone, even those who have seen it all. "Of all the events I've attended," a White House Marine guard said, nervously adjusting the cuffs of his military tuxedo as he gazed at the celebrity-studded crowd in the East Room--"this is really it." This last weekend, as it has for the last 13 years, Washington dressed up and turned out to honor five Americans whose cultural achievements have earned them a place in the nation's heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Bush welcomed the five artists who received the 1990 Kennedy Center honors Sunday, saying their work underscores the "crucial role" art plays in U.S. society. At a star-studded black tie reception at the White House, Bush honored jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie, actress Katharine Hepburn, composer Jule Styne, director Billy Wilder and opera singer Rise Stevens.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | DAVID FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood came calling with some of its biggest names: Barbra Streisand, Bette Midler, Madonna. But Broadway said "no." "Not for all the money in the world will we let them make another film version of 'Gypsy,' " said playwright Arthur Laurents. The first time Hollywood filmed the Broadway musical, it was "lousy," said composer Jule Styne, referring to the 1962 Warner Bros. adaptation that starred Rosalind Russell and Natalie Wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | MARTIN GOTTFRIED, Martin Gottfried is the author of the forthcoming biography, "Bob Fosse And All That Jazz," to be published by Bantam Books. His "Broadway Musicals" was published by Harry N. Abrams Co.) and
Change comes in waves, first as experiment, then as daring, finally affecting the way things are and settling into common use. Then another wave of change comes along. This is the pattern in most things and it is the pattern in the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
President Bush welcomed the five artists who received the 1990 Kennedy Center honors Sunday, saying their work underscores the "crucial role" art plays in U.S. society. At a star-studded black tie reception at the White House, Bush honored jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie, actress Katharine Hepburn, composer Jule Styne, director Billy Wilder and opera singer Rise Stevens.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When the heroine of the topical 1956 diversion "Bells Are Ringing" tells a Marlon Brando wannabe to knock off the Brando act because "there's a glut on the market," she might as well be talking about Broadway musical revivals, circa 2001. At the moment, Broadway has nine of them, ranging from "Annie Get Your Gun" to "The Rocky Horror Show." The latest second-time-around hopeful is "Bells Are Ringing," a project originally announced for a tryout at the Pasadena Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
It showed how thoroughly Dodgermania had spread when two women, sitting in the San Gabriel Civic Auditorium last Sunday, spent the last minutes before the curtain rose on "Gypsy" by watching the World Series on their micro TV. How could the San Gabriel Valley Civic Light Opera's "Gypsy" top the Dodgers? Try Jo Anne Worley as Rose. Then, for good measure, add Lauren Hathaway as Louise/Gypsy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
"The great gift of this show is seeing people who I've worked with over 50 years and knowing I'm still here," composer Jule Styne said of taking part in a public-television special focusing on his long and illustrious career. The two-hour program, "Broadway Sings: The Music of Jule Styne," is scheduled to be seen on "Great Performances" at 8 tonight on KCET Channel 28 in Los Angeles. It also airs Friday at 8 p.m. on (24) and at 9 p.m. on (15), and Saturday at 9:15 p.m. (50).
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