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Jules Aaron

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charles Ludlam, a real wise guy of a playwright, would have had fun with Orange County. There's enough overblown silliness around here to satisfy any farcical satirist, and Ludlam had a knack for puncturing any target in need of deflation. He never made it to sunny O.C. (he chose Manhattan as his home base and rarely strayed from it, founding the Ridiculous Theater Company in 1967 and creating broad, gender-twisting comedy with a slicing edge until his death 20 years later).
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lightning can strike twice, in the theater at least. On the heels of his acclaimed staging of "Company" for Laguna Playhouse last year, Jules Aaron demonstrates a masterful grasp of the show's subtleties and presentation challenges with a different cast and venue at West Coast Ensemble.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lightning can strike twice, in the theater at least. On the heels of his acclaimed staging of "Company" for Laguna Playhouse last year, Jules Aaron demonstrates a masterful grasp of the show's subtleties and presentation challenges with a different cast and venue at West Coast Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lightning can strike twice, in the theater at least. On the heels of his acclaimed staging of "Company" for Laguna Playhouse last year, Jules Aaron demonstrates a masterful grasp of the show's subtleties and presentation challenges with a different cast and venue at West Coast Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say good night, Jules. That is the message GroveShakespeare's acting artistic director Jules Aaron has gotten so far to an appeal for funds to keep the county's second-largest professional theater company from closing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
When the Grove Shakespeare Festival closed out last season with "Twelfth Night" at the Gem Theatre in February, artistic director Thomas F. Bradac devised a spare production meant to emphasize the text. As he dryly put it then, he was going for a "non-concept concept." He wanted to treat the play without the sort of high-concept spin that has become many a director's stock in trade. Bradac was not just deflating artistic pretensions about making Shakespeare "relevant."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
Director Jules Aaron, whose triumphant staging of "Measure for Measure" has just closed at the Grove Shakespeare Festival, is about to pose a formidable question.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | Jan Herman
Amid the sweeping changes at the Grove Shakespeare Festival--which has dropped its associated Grove Theatre Company designation, and has adopted a unified, indoor-outdoor schedule running through December instead of dual, year-round programming--one of the things that remains unchanged is the theatrical collaboration with guest director Jules Aaron. When the festival launches its 11th annual Shakespeare season Friday with "Romeo and Juliet" under the stars at the 550-seat Festival Amphitheatre in Garden Grove, it will mark the third consecutive year that Aaron has directed the opening play.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lightning can strike twice, in the theater at least. On the heels of his acclaimed staging of "Company" for Laguna Playhouse last year, Jules Aaron demonstrates a masterful grasp of the show's subtleties and presentation challenges with a different cast and venue at West Coast Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
As a boy, Jules Aaron appeared in a soda commercial with Buster Crabbe and sang on "The George Jessel Show." But any dream of a performing career ended one Saturday afternoon in Detroit, when Aaron, then 20, caught Laurence Olivier's performance in a touring production of "Becket." "I thought, 'If he can give this kind of performance in Detroit at a Saturday matinee, I'm probably in the wrong business." And thus, Aaron jokes, he and the world were spared "a lot of pain."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1997 | Daryl H. Miller, Daryl H. Miller is a Los Angeles-based theater writer
As a boy, Jules Aaron appeared in a soda commercial with Buster Crabbe and sang on "The George Jessel Show." But any dream of a performing career ended one Saturday afternoon in Detroit, when Aaron, then 20, caught Laurence Olivier's performance in a touring production of "Becket." "I thought, 'If he can give this kind of performance in Detroit at a Saturday matinee, I'm probably in the wrong business." And thus, Aaron jokes, he and the world were spared "a lot of pain."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charles Ludlam, a real wise guy of a playwright, would have had fun with Orange County. There's enough overblown silliness around here to satisfy any farcical satirist, and Ludlam had a knack for puncturing any target in need of deflation. He never made it to sunny O.C. (he chose Manhattan as his home base and rarely strayed from it, founding the Ridiculous Theater Company in 1967 and creating broad, gender-twisting comedy with a slicing edge until his death 20 years later).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say good night, Jules. That is the message GroveShakespeare's acting artistic director Jules Aaron has gotten so far to an appeal for funds to keep the county's second-largest professional theater company from closing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
Director Jules Aaron, whose triumphant staging of "Measure for Measure" has just closed at the Grove Shakespeare Festival, is about to pose a formidable question.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
When the Grove Shakespeare Festival closed out last season with "Twelfth Night" at the Gem Theatre in February, artistic director Thomas F. Bradac devised a spare production meant to emphasize the text. As he dryly put it then, he was going for a "non-concept concept." He wanted to treat the play without the sort of high-concept spin that has become many a director's stock in trade. Bradac was not just deflating artistic pretensions about making Shakespeare "relevant."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | Jan Herman
Amid the sweeping changes at the Grove Shakespeare Festival--which has dropped its associated Grove Theatre Company designation, and has adopted a unified, indoor-outdoor schedule running through December instead of dual, year-round programming--one of the things that remains unchanged is the theatrical collaboration with guest director Jules Aaron. When the festival launches its 11th annual Shakespeare season Friday with "Romeo and Juliet" under the stars at the 550-seat Festival Amphitheatre in Garden Grove, it will mark the third consecutive year that Aaron has directed the opening play.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
A new production of "Romeo and Juliet"--set in contemporary Southern California--will close Grove-Shakespeare's 1993 season in the 550-seat Festival Amphitheatre, company officials announced Tuesday. The play will be directed by GroveShakespeare artistic director Stuart MacDowell. Also announced Tuesday was a new production of "Midsummer Night's Dream," to be directed by Jules Aaron. The company had previously announced its season-opening production of "King Lear."
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