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Jules Dassin

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NEWS
April 2, 2008
Dassin obituary: The obituary in Tuesday's California section on director Jules Dassin labeled his "The Tell-Tale Heart" a feature film. It was a 20-minute short.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Susan King
"Now You See Me," which opens Friday, is a caper thriller starring Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo and Oscar-winners Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine. The film is about an FBI agent and an Interpol detective on the hunt for a team of young illusionists who pull off elaborate bank heists during their performances and hand out the money to their audiences. The heist/caper genre has been popular since the silent era and has run the gamut from noirish thrillers such as John Huston's 1950 "The Asphalt Jungle" and Stanley Kubrick's 1956 "The Killing" to broad comedies like Stanley Kramer's 1963 hit "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Susan King
"Now You See Me," which opens Friday, is a caper thriller starring Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo and Oscar-winners Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine. The film is about an FBI agent and an Interpol detective on the hunt for a team of young illusionists who pull off elaborate bank heists during their performances and hand out the money to their audiences. The heist/caper genre has been popular since the silent era and has run the gamut from noirish thrillers such as John Huston's 1950 "The Asphalt Jungle" and Stanley Kubrick's 1956 "The Killing" to broad comedies like Stanley Kramer's 1963 hit "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2009 | Susan King
The American Cinematheque will celebrate a brooding actor, a blacklisted director and a bronco-buster this weekend. With his sonorous voice and good looks, James Mason had a truly stellar career in England and America. Tonight, the Aero Theatre will mark the centennial of his birth by showing Stanley Kubrick's 1962 "Lolita," in which he plays a professor obsessed with a nymphet (Sue Lyon), and Carol Reed's 1947 classic "Odd Man Out," which casts Mason as a wounded IRA gunman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2004
I find it infuriating that so many prominent people and institutions in America see nothing amiss about honoring those who have been supporters of the Soviet Union and communism through much of their lives. In this instance, it's Jules Dassin, a very skilled film director who left the U.S. in 1952 because he was identified as a communist by some of his Hollywood pals ("Celebrating the Crimes and Capers of Dassin," April 11). It is gross and quite shameful when the Los Angeles Times assigns Susan King to do a very friendly write-up of someone who reportedly had been an avid supporter of the Soviet Union and communism in much of his life but has also done a thing or two in the movies that may be quite admirable.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
To call director Jules Dassin a survivor is something of an understatement. Now 92 and a longtime resident of Athens, Dassin is the only big blacklisted Hollywood director who's still alive. Most of his Hollywood friends "have checked out and gone," he says, but he's hoping to see the few who are left during his first trip to Los Angeles in more than a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2008 | Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Jules Dassin, the blacklisted American filmmaker who was a master of film noir, directing such classics as "Brute Force," "The Naked City" and "Rififi," died Monday in an Athens hospital. He was 96. The cause of death was not made public. The Associated Press reported that he had been in the hospital for a couple of weeks. "Greece mourns the loss of a rare human being, a significant artist and true friend," Prime Minister Costas Karamanlis said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2009 | Susan King
The American Cinematheque will celebrate a brooding actor, a blacklisted director and a bronco-buster this weekend. With his sonorous voice and good looks, James Mason had a truly stellar career in England and America. Tonight, the Aero Theatre will mark the centennial of his birth by showing Stanley Kubrick's 1962 "Lolita," in which he plays a professor obsessed with a nymphet (Sue Lyon), and Carol Reed's 1947 classic "Odd Man Out," which casts Mason as a wounded IRA gunman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Time is not necessarily kind to the classics. Films that were admired in decadespast do not always hold up to more recent scrutiny. "Rififi" is different. One of the great crime thrillers, the benchmark all succeeding heist films have been measured against, it's no musty museum piece but a driving, compelling piece of work, redolent of the air of human frailty and fatalistic doom.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
JULES DASSIN was one of the key filmmakers of postwar America. In the late 1940s, having escaped the restrictive employment of MGM, he reinvented himself as a director of brash, socially conscious pulp. By 1950, he was on the blacklist, and the Hollywood career of this committed leftist, the Connecticut-born son of a Russian Jewish immigrant, was effectively over.
NEWS
April 2, 2008
Dassin obituary: The obituary in Tuesday's California section on director Jules Dassin labeled his "The Tell-Tale Heart" a feature film. It was a 20-minute short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2008 | Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Jules Dassin, the blacklisted American filmmaker who was a master of film noir, directing such classics as "Brute Force," "The Naked City" and "Rififi," died Monday in an Athens hospital. He was 96. The cause of death was not made public. The Associated Press reported that he had been in the hospital for a couple of weeks. "Greece mourns the loss of a rare human being, a significant artist and true friend," Prime Minister Costas Karamanlis said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
JULES DASSIN was one of the key filmmakers of postwar America. In the late 1940s, having escaped the restrictive employment of MGM, he reinvented himself as a director of brash, socially conscious pulp. By 1950, he was on the blacklist, and the Hollywood career of this committed leftist, the Connecticut-born son of a Russian Jewish immigrant, was effectively over.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2004
I find it infuriating that so many prominent people and institutions in America see nothing amiss about honoring those who have been supporters of the Soviet Union and communism through much of their lives. In this instance, it's Jules Dassin, a very skilled film director who left the U.S. in 1952 because he was identified as a communist by some of his Hollywood pals ("Celebrating the Crimes and Capers of Dassin," April 11). It is gross and quite shameful when the Los Angeles Times assigns Susan King to do a very friendly write-up of someone who reportedly had been an avid supporter of the Soviet Union and communism in much of his life but has also done a thing or two in the movies that may be quite admirable.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
To call director Jules Dassin a survivor is something of an understatement. Now 92 and a longtime resident of Athens, Dassin is the only big blacklisted Hollywood director who's still alive. Most of his Hollywood friends "have checked out and gone," he says, but he's hoping to see the few who are left during his first trip to Los Angeles in more than a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Time is not necessarily kind to the classics. Films that were admired in decadespast do not always hold up to more recent scrutiny. "Rififi" is different. One of the great crime thrillers, the benchmark all succeeding heist films have been measured against, it's no musty museum piece but a driving, compelling piece of work, redolent of the air of human frailty and fatalistic doom.
NEWS
June 18, 1994
Manos Hadjidakis, 68, Greek composer who won an Academy Award for his lively music in the film "Never on Sunday." Self-taught, Hadjidakis drew heavily on Greece's folk music for popular songs and for his scores for films and plays. He won the Oscar for Jules Dassin's 1960 film starring Dassin's wife, the late Melina Mercouri, as the happy prostitute who espouses the song and film title. Hadjidakis also scored the film "America, America" by Elia Kazan and another Dassin film, "Topkapi."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2007
THANKS to Dennis Lim for his article on the extraordinary filmmaker Jules Dassin ["Everywhere a Bleak Outlook," April 15]. One of the greatest movies ever made is "Phaedra," which was written, directed and produced by Dassin and starred his beautiful wife, Melina Mercouri, as well as the magnificent actor Anthony Perkins. This film is a masterpiece, and I just have to call attention to "Phaedra" since it was not mentioned. MARJORIE RUBIN Los Angeles
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