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Jules Feiffer

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Josh Lambert
Backing Into Forward A Memoir Jules Feiffer Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 450 pp., $30 Whether newspapers live or die, the prognosis for the comic strip doesn't look promising. The extinction of the form not much more than a century after its birth would represent only a very minor tragedy too, given the rise of the graphic novel -- who would shed a tear for "Hägar the Horrible" in the age of "Fun Home" and "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth"? -- except it would also mean we no longer live in a world with a berth reserved for the likes of Jules Feiffer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
L.A. zinesters, their friends, family and fans will be gathering Sunday in Culver City for the city's third annual Zinefest . A conversation with Jaime Hernandez of Love and Rockets fame will close out the event at 5:15 p.m. It's a celebration of zines, micro-published DIY magazines. Typically handmade and/or hand-copied, stapled or otherwise assembled, they can tell coherent narratives or be a chaotic, Dada-ist jumble. Stories, illustrations, poems, collages, personal esoteric explorations and other expressions: There was a time when people thought these had migrated online.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996
Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist, novelist and screenwriter Jules Feiffer will speak on his career and art from his new book, "A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears," at Every Picture Tells a Story gallery in Hollywood on Jan. 27 at 6 p.m. The event kicks off a retrospective of the artist's work, on exhibit through March 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Far out isn't far enough" is the way the once-banned children's book illustrator/writer Tomi Ungerer describes his belief that creativity should have no limits, should face no boundaries. That line in the sand gives the brash new documentary on the artist its overly long and winding name - "Far Out Isn't Far Enough: The Tomi Ungerer Story. " The man we meet in this excellent examination of his controversial work would probably have gone with something pithier and more subversive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"I'm not the first to say that what serves me best as a cartoonist is a disaster for everybody else," says Pulitzer Prize winner Jules Feiffer. "In terms of my future as a political cartoonist, there's no question that George Bush should be my candidate of choice." As one the most respected editorial cartoonists in America, Feiffer has spent the last 30 years finding humor in political disasters and social problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT
In 1969, Jules Feiffer wrote a play. Its premise was that men really don't like women. He showed it to Mike Nichols, famous director by trade. "He loved it and said, 'I want to do it, but I think it's a movie, not a play.' " Feiffer said. Two years later, it was a movie, "Carnal Knowledge," a controversial tale of casual sex, desperate boredom and a certain amount of nasty. It starred Jack Nicholson, Art Garfunkel and Ann-Margret. "Carnal Knowledge" is a play again.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jules Feiffer, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and author/playwright whose work appears in over 100 newspapers, will be at Adventures For Kids, 3457 Telegraph Road, Ventura from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monday. He'll be signing his first book for children, "The Man in the Ceiling," published by HarperCollins. Don't miss this rare opportunity to meet the man whose cartoons have since 1956 mirrored our foibles, fashions and mad ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was 23 years old and living in his first apartment on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Jules Feiffer got lucky. A modern dancer came home with him and spent the night. "She was the first girl who ever did that," Feiffer recalled with just a note of nostalgia. "You don't forget that. She has been revisiting me ever since in the cartoons." These days, the dancer--sketched differently at various times in his life to reflect past girlfriends--is disappointed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2000
As one of Feiffer's loyal readers, I find it difficult to believe and very disheartening to have this marvelous cartoon coming to an end. As a former dancer (and always a dancer at heart), the delightful dancer expressing herself with balletic movement and satire has held a special joy for me throughout the years. Turning to the last page of Calendar has been a Sunday ritual for as long as I can remember. Thank you, Jules Feiffer, for years of great joy and satire--you will be sorely missed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1996
Being of the Jewish faith as well as an aficionado of Jules Feiffer's humor and insight, I feel it necessary to defend his April 7 cartoon that some readers have condemned, misunderstanding, I believe, Feiffer's intentions (Letters, April 14). I dislike the "Seinfeld" program most intensely just because the Jewish men depicted are exactly what they were termed, "brash, oafish and ignorant"--and may I add whiny and stupid as well? I applaud Feiffer's observations! NORMAN S. BRONSON Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Florence Parry Heide, a prolific children's book author best known for her droll illustrated picture book "The Shrinking of Treehorn" and her ability to convey in her writing what it is like to be a child, has died. She was 92. Heide died in her sleep Monday at her home in Kenosha, Wis., said Judith Heide Gilliland, one of her daughters. A self-described late bloomer, Heide didn't become a published author until her late 40s when the illustrated picture book she co-wrote — "Maximilian," about a mouse that wished it could fly like a bird — came out in 1967.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2010
The Early Show The cast of "The Big Bang Theory." (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Laura and Lisa Ling; Jonah Hill and Russell Brand; Jane Pauley; Cheryl Forberg; Neil Patrick Harris. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC KTLA Morning News (N) 7 a.m. KTLA Good Morning America The cast of "Modern Family." (N) 7 a.m. KABC Good Day L.A. (N) 7 a.m. KTTV Live With Regis and Kelly Ashton Kutcher; Miss USA Rima Fakih. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Will Forte; Michael Emerson. (N) 10 a.m. KABC Rachael Ray Regis Philbin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2010
BOOKS An Evening With Ian McEwan This lively evening of arts and letters features a conversation between the bestselling author of "Atonement" and David Kipen, literature director of the National Endowment for the Arts. McEwan's new novel, "Solar," explores a philandering Nobel prize-winning physicist's effort to save the world from environmental disaster. The Aratani/Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles. 8 p.m. $25. (213) 680-3700. www.lfla.org. Joyce Maynard and Dana Goodyear This reading of selected pieces from the literary magazine Canteen has high stakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010
Words & Ideas Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY Chopin with Cherries: A Tribute in Verse: A poetry reading and piano recital will feature contributors to the new anthology of poems celebrating the 200th anniversary of the Polish composer's birth. Participants include pianist Dr. Neil Galanter and poets Millicent Borges Accardi, Lia Brooks, Emily Fragos, Helen Graziano, Rebeca Hoffmann, Amy Lowell, Rick Lupert, Ruth Nolan, Nils Petersen, Susan Rogers, Maja Trochimczyk and many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Josh Lambert
Backing Into Forward A Memoir Jules Feiffer Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 450 pp., $30 Whether newspapers live or die, the prognosis for the comic strip doesn't look promising. The extinction of the form not much more than a century after its birth would represent only a very minor tragedy too, given the rise of the graphic novel -- who would shed a tear for "Hägar the Horrible" in the age of "Fun Home" and "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth"? -- except it would also mean we no longer live in a world with a berth reserved for the likes of Jules Feiffer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2000
As one of Feiffer's loyal readers, I find it difficult to believe and very disheartening to have this marvelous cartoon coming to an end. As a former dancer (and always a dancer at heart), the delightful dancer expressing herself with balletic movement and satire has held a special joy for me throughout the years. Turning to the last page of Calendar has been a Sunday ritual for as long as I can remember. Thank you, Jules Feiffer, for years of great joy and satire--you will be sorely missed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989
Valerie Reilly's Aug. 6 letter condemning Jules Feiffer's cartoon asserts it is "eugenically oriented" thinking to conclude that restrictions on abortion may lead to more abused, retarded or delinquent children. Here's a more reasonable assumption about the way that free access to abortion may prevent an increase in the number of problem children: Consider that people who turn to abortion do so because they have concluded that they are not, at this point in their lives, able to raise a child.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he was 23 years old and living in his first apartment on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Jules Feiffer got lucky. A modern dancer came home with him and spent the night. "She was the first girl who ever did that," Feiffer recalled with just a note of nostalgia. "You don't forget that. She has been revisiting me ever since in the cartoons." These days, the dancer--sketched differently at various times in his life to reflect past girlfriends--is disappointed.
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