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Jules Fisher

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2010 | By Cristy Lytal, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When they were growing up, Jules Fisher dreamed of becoming a magician and Peggy Eisenhauer trained to become a concert pianist. Eventually they ended up joining forces to bring their special combination of hocus-pocus and musicality to films, including this month's "Burlesque," through theatrical lighting design. Traditionally, film uses close-ups in the same way that theater uses spotlights: to direct the audience's attention. However, with a résumé that includes Broadway and off-Broadway shows, operas and concerts, Fisher and Eisenhauer bring their dynamic, theatrical lighting sensibility to film sets, where lighting is usually more static.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2010 | By Cristy Lytal, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When they were growing up, Jules Fisher dreamed of becoming a magician and Peggy Eisenhauer trained to become a concert pianist. Eventually they ended up joining forces to bring their special combination of hocus-pocus and musicality to films, including this month's "Burlesque," through theatrical lighting design. Traditionally, film uses close-ups in the same way that theater uses spotlights: to direct the audience's attention. However, with a résumé that includes Broadway and off-Broadway shows, operas and concerts, Fisher and Eisenhauer bring their dynamic, theatrical lighting sensibility to film sets, where lighting is usually more static.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | Alina Tugend, Special to The Times
Broadway and Hollywood, which have always been somewhat prickly cousins, are increasingly poaching each other's techniques -- and perhaps nothing illustrates that more this year than the film success of the Tony Award-winning lighting designing team of Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhauer. Their specialty is lighting musical numbers on stage and in film, and the Oscar-nominated "Chicago" is the most spectacular cinematic showcase to date for their talents.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | Alina Tugend, Special to The Times
Broadway and Hollywood, which have always been somewhat prickly cousins, are increasingly poaching each other's techniques -- and perhaps nothing illustrates that more this year than the film success of the Tony Award-winning lighting designing team of Jules Fisher and Peggy Eisenhauer. Their specialty is lighting musical numbers on stage and in film, and the Oscar-nominated "Chicago" is the most spectacular cinematic showcase to date for their talents.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | Associated Press
Here is the list of Tony Award winners for Broadway's 1989-90 season. Play: "The Grapes of Wrath." Musical: "City of Angels." Revival: "Gypsy." Actor, Play: Robert Morse, "Tru." Actress, Play: Maggie Smith, "Lettice & Lovage." Actor, Musical: James Naughton, "City of Angels." Actress, Musical: Tyne Daly, "Gypsy." Book, Musical: Larry Gelbart, "City of Angels." Score, Musical: Cy Coleman music, David Zippel lyrics, "City of Angels." Director, Play: Frank Galati, "The Grapes of Wrath."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Will Rogers Follies" sure does create a hankerin' for the good ol' days. But they're not the same good old days that the show's creators had in mind. Instead, this vacuous mishmash at the Pantages Theater makes you long for the time when people could write musicals as well as they could stage them. Tommy Tune, who staged "Will Rogers," is the main attraction--more than Rogers or Keith Carradine, who plays Rogers. The show exists primarily as a playground for Tune and his designers.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
"Crazy for You," a loving recreation of a 1930s song-and-dance extravaganza featuring old songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was named best musical of the 1991-92 Broadway season Sunday at the annual Tony Awards ceremony. "Dancing at Lughnasa," Brian Friel's memory play about five unmarried Irish sisters, was chosen best play and won two other awards--featured actress for Brid Brennan and for director, Patrick Mason.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1996 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
'Mary Poppins Hoppin' Mad!" cried the New York Post. Julie Andrews spurned the Tony nomination when she felt that the nominators spurned her show, the depressingly mediocre "Victor/Victoria." Because the Tonys are both an award and a national commercial, a sense of entitlement seems to cling to the annual event. Both Jackie Mason and David Merrick have tried to sue the folks who administer the Tony Awards. I can't remember anyone suing the Pulitzer committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I want to go to Hollywood," an ambitious typist sings in the musical "Grand Hotel." Well, she made it. "Grand Hotel" is open for business at the Pantages Theatre, on Hollywood Boulevard. It's a homecoming of sorts. This show's precursor, "At the Grand," was a 1958 offering of Los Angeles Civic Light Opera, and this edition opens a new season for the same organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
An alternate title for "Grand Hotel," the musical that opened a six-day run at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa Tuesday, might be "As the Revolving Door Turns." This nonstop two-hour Broadway showpiece, based on Vicki Baum's novel of the same name and set in 1928 Berlin, is high-gear, swank-scale soap opera, wrenched from the jaws of oblivion by the ever-inventive Tommy Tune, director and choreographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"People die from an excess of the truth," goes a line somewhere in the second half of Ariel Dorfman's "Death and the Maiden," that opened Tuesday at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. It sums up in a nutshell, what this self-exiled Chilean's latest play is mostly about: the truth. Does it exist? Whose truth? And can it ever be finite? New take. Old subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until "Crazy for You" was named best musical, in the final award at the end of the Tony ceremony Sunday, no one would have guessed that the Tony voters were crazy for updated Gershwin. The new musical set to old Gershwin tunes won none of the other major awards--score, book, director, leading actors--that usually forecast which show will take the top musical award. Its only other honors, prior to the big one, went to choreographer Susan Stroman and costume designer William Ivey Long.
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