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Julia Butterfly Hill

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NEWS
December 18, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two years after she began her marathon tree-sit, Julia "Butterfly" Hill has reached an agreement with Pacific Lumber Co. to leave the giant Humboldt County redwood tree she has called home, a company spokesman said Friday. Hill could not be reached for comment, but a spokeswoman said she will hold a news conference today "in person" in the former logging town of Stafford. The spokeswoman declined to discuss the agreement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
I knew that the effort to save L.A.'s Southside urban farm was getting serious when Fred Starner wrote a folk song about it. The minute he heard that the farm was probably on the way to becoming history, he sat right down and banged out words to the tune of Woody Guthrie's "This Land." The lyrics don't sound right unless you're actually singing the music, but trust me when I say it's all there: poverty, tears, Jesus, greed and how "Horowitz don't like gardening on hands and knees."
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MAGAZINE
January 20, 2002 | MATTHEW HELLER, Matthew Heller last wrote for the magazine about the transporting of radioactive nuclear waste along California 127
On this balmy October evening, some 400 well-heeled Angelenos have gathered in the auditorium of the Freud Playhouse at UCLA. They have paid up to $500 a ticket to attend a fund-raiser for the Ark Trust animal-protection group. Their ranks include stars such as Lindsey "The Bionic Woman" Wagner and Gillian Anderson of "The X-Files." Gloria Steinem is hosting the event, billed as "An Evening of Music and Inspiration." Later, she will introduce singer Sophie B.
MAGAZINE
January 20, 2002 | MATTHEW HELLER, Matthew Heller last wrote for the magazine about the transporting of radioactive nuclear waste along California 127
On this balmy October evening, some 400 well-heeled Angelenos have gathered in the auditorium of the Freud Playhouse at UCLA. They have paid up to $500 a ticket to attend a fund-raiser for the Ark Trust animal-protection group. Their ranks include stars such as Lindsey "The Bionic Woman" Wagner and Gillian Anderson of "The X-Files." Gloria Steinem is hosting the event, billed as "An Evening of Music and Inspiration." Later, she will introduce singer Sophie B.
BOOKS
March 26, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE LEGACY OF LUNA; The Story of a Tree, a Woman, and the Struggle to Save the Redwoods By Julia Butterfly Hill; HarperSanFrancisco: 256 pp., $25 Spring 1997 comes to the redwoods. Julia Butterfly Hill has survived the first of two winters on a platform 18 stories up during her tree sit to save Luna, a lone redwood owned by Pacific Lumber and blue-marked for cutting. "I awoke to nature's morning breath, sweet as honey," she writes, "and watched the sun rise."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
I knew that the effort to save L.A.'s Southside urban farm was getting serious when Fred Starner wrote a folk song about it. The minute he heard that the farm was probably on the way to becoming history, he sat right down and banged out words to the tune of Woody Guthrie's "This Land." The lyrics don't sound right unless you're actually singing the music, but trust me when I say it's all there: poverty, tears, Jesus, greed and how "Horowitz don't like gardening on hands and knees."
BOOKS
July 2, 2000 | MICHAEL MCCLURE, Michael McClure is a poet, novelist and playwright whose most recent book is "Touching the Edge: Dharma Devotions."
In December 1999, after two years of tree-sitting, 25-year-old Julia Hill climbed down from her adopted redwood, Luna, one of the last of the ancient-growth redwoods in Northern California. Hill had taken the environmentalist name "Butterfly" before going up the tree, just as other tree activists had taken "Shakespeare," "Almond" and "Gypsy." For two years, the feet of this woman, a model in high school and the daughter of an itinerant Southern preacher, did not touch the Earth.
NEWS
December 22, 1998 | Associated Press
Julia Butterfly Hill, who has been living in an ancient redwood tree for nearly a year to prevent loggers from cutting it down, is putting up lights for Christmas. But just as Hill's tree, which she calls Luna, is hundreds of times bigger than an ordinary Christmas tree, so are her lights. They are flashing beacons with a range of over two miles.
MAGAZINE
October 1, 2006 | David K. Israel
What do Queen Latifah, Billy Crystal, Jerry Seinfeld, Caroline Kennedy, Madonna, Lynne Cheney, Jorge Posada and Paul McCartney have in common (besides sizable incomes)? Well, if you have young kids, you probably already know the answer: children's books. It seems like every time you walk into a bookstore, some other celebrity has joined the craze. Jamie Lee Curtis alone has seven titles available, some bestsellers.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 2002
I found the story on Julia Butterfly Hill ("Butterfly's Hard Landing," by Matthew Heller, Jan. 20) feverishly thought provoking. Although I consider myself a conservative in many ways, dismissing her as an infatuated tree hugger is something I am no longer capable of. I admire her dedication and her ability to draw media attention. She is still quite young, and therefore hard to fault, but her case represents a problem in the activist population. The article displayed the phenomenal ineptitude of the environmental protection movement.
BOOKS
July 2, 2000 | MICHAEL MCCLURE, Michael McClure is a poet, novelist and playwright whose most recent book is "Touching the Edge: Dharma Devotions."
In December 1999, after two years of tree-sitting, 25-year-old Julia Hill climbed down from her adopted redwood, Luna, one of the last of the ancient-growth redwoods in Northern California. Hill had taken the environmentalist name "Butterfly" before going up the tree, just as other tree activists had taken "Shakespeare," "Almond" and "Gypsy." For two years, the feet of this woman, a model in high school and the daughter of an itinerant Southern preacher, did not touch the Earth.
BOOKS
March 26, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE LEGACY OF LUNA; The Story of a Tree, a Woman, and the Struggle to Save the Redwoods By Julia Butterfly Hill; HarperSanFrancisco: 256 pp., $25 Spring 1997 comes to the redwoods. Julia Butterfly Hill has survived the first of two winters on a platform 18 stories up during her tree sit to save Luna, a lone redwood owned by Pacific Lumber and blue-marked for cutting. "I awoke to nature's morning breath, sweet as honey," she writes, "and watched the sun rise."
NEWS
December 18, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two years after she began her marathon tree-sit, Julia "Butterfly" Hill has reached an agreement with Pacific Lumber Co. to leave the giant Humboldt County redwood tree she has called home, a company spokesman said Friday. Hill could not be reached for comment, but a spokeswoman said she will hold a news conference today "in person" in the former logging town of Stafford. The spokeswoman declined to discuss the agreement.
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE
Julia "Butterfly" Hill ends the year just the way she began it: high up in a 1,000-year-old tree. Hill, a 24-year-old environmental activist, clambered up the ancient Northern California redwood on Dec. 10, 1997, and pledged to stay put until the Pacific Lumber Co. promised not to cut the tree down. Company officials said nothing doing and continue to log around her.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The title of the no-frills documentary "Who Bombed Judi Bari?" is not a rhetorical question; the filmmakers are offering a $50,000 reward for answers. The 1990 attack on two Northern California environmental activists remains an unsolved case, though over the years it has been at the center of media scrutiny and a landmark 1st Amendment ruling against the FBI and Oakland police. Darryl Cherney, who produced the film, was in a car with Judi Bari when a pipe bomb exploded. Members of the direct-action group Earth First!
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