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April 2, 2010 | By Karen Wada
Eight years ago, Julia Cho came to South Coast Repertory for the first time. She was a novice author, still in grad school, and excited to have her play, "99 Histories," read at the Pacific Playwrights Festival. Her visit was "amazing," she recalls. "I couldn't believe they were going to fly me to Costa Mesa from New York and put me up in a hotel, let alone put on my play." The experience also proved to be "a little intimidating," she says. "I was glad to be there, but I wasn't sure I belonged with all the older, more established playwrights."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By Karen Wada
Eight years ago, Julia Cho came to South Coast Repertory for the first time. She was a novice author, still in grad school, and excited to have her play, "99 Histories," read at the Pacific Playwrights Festival. Her visit was "amazing," she recalls. "I couldn't believe they were going to fly me to Costa Mesa from New York and put me up in a hotel, let alone put on my play." The experience also proved to be "a little intimidating," she says. "I was glad to be there, but I wasn't sure I belonged with all the older, more established playwrights."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Large pieces of Julia Cho's family past in Korea are missing, and she concedes they may never be found. Her play, "99 Histories," is partly a reflection on that loss. It also is the product of Cho's conviction that in the absence of facts, the imagination must take over, and that it can suffice. The play is one of five unproduced works-in-progress that will have public readings in the annual Pacific Playwrights Festival, Friday through Sunday at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008
I was inspired by Charles McNulty's essay about our contemporary theater and whether it tells our country's current history ["Afflict the Comfortable? Not Broadway," Oct. 26]. I think this question, this problem, is why I became a playwright some years ago. Because my mother looked me in the eye and said, "Tell our story, make us a part of history." Indeed, I had never exactly seen my family's stories or problems grappled with on the stage. I had seen pieces, growing up, like "Sarafina," that opened my heart and left an indelible mark on my mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008
I was inspired by Charles McNulty's essay about our contemporary theater and whether it tells our country's current history ["Afflict the Comfortable? Not Broadway," Oct. 26]. I think this question, this problem, is why I became a playwright some years ago. Because my mother looked me in the eye and said, "Tell our story, make us a part of history." Indeed, I had never exactly seen my family's stories or problems grappled with on the stage. I had seen pieces, growing up, like "Sarafina," that opened my heart and left an indelible mark on my mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2007 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
MRS. K used to give piano lessons. But that was years ago. These days, she sits alone in her living room, eager to chat with anyone who comes to visit. Nobody does. Soon, we realize that things are not what they seem. For starters, Mrs. K is not alone. She exists, as do many people in Julia Cho's plays, in a twilight world crowded with memories that hover like ghosts. In "The Piano Teacher," which opens Friday at South Coast Repertory, we discover what happens when Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in nearly two decades, South Coast Repertory will stage a play by William Shakespeare, as part of its 2006-07 season. The inclusion of "Hamlet," directed by Daniel Sullivan and starring Hamish Linklater in the title role, marks a first for the Costa Mesa theater: It has never performed "Hamlet." The Segerstrom Stage season will open with George Walker's "Nothing Sacred," a play based on "Fathers and Sons," a novel by Russian author Ivan Turgenev.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2005 | Lynne Heffley
American politics, spirituality and morality are viewed through a theatrical prism at the eighth annual Ojai Playwrights Conference, an intensive, in-residence play development retreat for playwrights, actors, dramaturges and directors. Helmed by artistic director Robert Egan, the conference culminates this week at rustic Happy Valley School's Zalk Theatre, with public play readings and symposia presented by noted theater artists from Los Angeles and the East Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006 | F. Kathleen Foley
Deceptively modest in scale, Julia Cho's "The Winchester House," now receiving its world premiere at the Theatre @ Boston Court, is actually a surprisingly dense, "Rashomon"-like drama about a young woman's increasingly uncertain remembrance of a molestation. Both a poignant memory play and a trenchant indictment of the essential unreliability of memory, "Winchester" toys with easy assumptions about morality -- and reality.
NEWS
March 9, 2006 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
NO bankable-name playwrights are on the bill for this year's Pacific Playwrights Festival, but South Coast Repertory, which produces the annual weekend of new plays, has long been in the business of getting in on the ground floor with commercially unproved talent. Past festivals have featured works in progress by such acclaimed names as Donald Margulies, Richard Greenberg and Beth Henley, balanced with scripts by unknowns.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2007 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
MRS. K used to give piano lessons. But that was years ago. These days, she sits alone in her living room, eager to chat with anyone who comes to visit. Nobody does. Soon, we realize that things are not what they seem. For starters, Mrs. K is not alone. She exists, as do many people in Julia Cho's plays, in a twilight world crowded with memories that hover like ghosts. In "The Piano Teacher," which opens Friday at South Coast Repertory, we discover what happens when Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Large pieces of Julia Cho's family past in Korea are missing, and she concedes they may never be found. Her play, "99 Histories," is partly a reflection on that loss. It also is the product of Cho's conviction that in the absence of facts, the imagination must take over, and that it can suffice. The play is one of five unproduced works-in-progress that will have public readings in the annual Pacific Playwrights Festival, Friday through Sunday at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The world is used to watching actual or fictitious Orange Countians on television in “Arrested Development,” “The Real Housewives of Orange County” and “The O.C.” South Coast Repertory, the county's flagship theater company, is doing its own part in cultivating indigenous O.C. stories and characters for the stage. In the newly announced “CrossRoads Commissioning Project,” South Coast Rep will use a $150,000 grant from the Time Warner Foundation to send six playwrights into the field for encounters with O.C. communties - ethnic or other -- from which they're expected to draw inspiration for new plays.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors tend not to improvise at South Coast Repertory, where the guiding ethic is a faithful adherence to the words and meanings that playwrights put on the page. But a whole lot of improvising--logistical, not dramatic--is going on in connection with this year's fifth annual Pacific Playwrights Festival. Hardhats, not actors, will inhabit the theater in June, when the festival devoted to showcasing and developing works in progress customarily takes place.
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