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Julia Glass

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Heller McAlpin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Widower's Tale A Novel Julia Glass Pantheon: 402 pp., $25.95 The outspokenly fuddy-duddy 70-year-old patriarch at the center of "The Widower's Tale," Julia Glass' class-consciousness-raising new novel, is a recently retired Harvard librarian named Percival Darling. Couple the surname Darling with just about any moniker — well, maybe not the kids from "Peter Pan" — and your mind inserts a comma, evoking a Noel Coward play in which glamorous characters are always "darling-ing" each other, sometimes through clenched teeth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2010 | By Heller McAlpin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Widower's Tale A Novel Julia Glass Pantheon: 402 pp., $25.95 The outspokenly fuddy-duddy 70-year-old patriarch at the center of "The Widower's Tale," Julia Glass' class-consciousness-raising new novel, is a recently retired Harvard librarian named Percival Darling. Couple the surname Darling with just about any moniker — well, maybe not the kids from "Peter Pan" — and your mind inserts a comma, evoking a Noel Coward play in which glamorous characters are always "darling-ing" each other, sometimes through clenched teeth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | Claudia La Rocco, Associated Press
Julia Glass arrives at a Greenwich Village cafe in a whirl of colors: turquoise scarf, shimmering purple peasant blouse, jade green glasses. It is a fitting outfit for the former painter and author of the visually lush "Three Junes," the winner of the 2002 National Book Award.
BOOKS
May 28, 2006 | Art Winslow, Art Winslow, a former executive editor and literary editor of the Nation, writes frequently on books and culture.
BEFORE the plot of Julia Glass' "The Whole World Over" veered into the twin towers at the base of Manhattan, it had been flying pretty high. In the preceding 435 pages, Glass was commandeering a more-than-respectable novel in which couplings and decouplings, parenthoods and childhoods, fidelities and infidelities were movingly drawn from the grist of everyday life and the human heart's tendency to wander so fitfully. Yet when her characters are sped through the public trauma of Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
Craig Johnson comes as advertised. Standing outside the Autry National Center on a boiling summer afternoon, the Wyoming-based crime novelist is decked out in a long-sleeve shirt made of heavy cotton, scuffed brown boots and a 10-gallon hat that provides shade, but not nearly enough. Spotting his interlocutor, Johnson sticks out his hand and delivers a booming "How ya doin'?!"
BOOKS
May 28, 2006 | Art Winslow, Art Winslow, a former executive editor and literary editor of the Nation, writes frequently on books and culture.
BEFORE the plot of Julia Glass' "The Whole World Over" veered into the twin towers at the base of Manhattan, it had been flying pretty high. In the preceding 435 pages, Glass was commandeering a more-than-respectable novel in which couplings and decouplings, parenthoods and childhoods, fidelities and infidelities were movingly drawn from the grist of everyday life and the human heart's tendency to wander so fitfully. Yet when her characters are sped through the public trauma of Sept.
NEWS
October 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
"Master of the Senate," the third volume of Robert Caro's epic chronicle of the life and times of President Lyndon B. Johnson, is among the finalists for the 53rd annual National Book Awards. Other nonfiction nominees announced Wednesday included Steve Olson's "Mapping Human History," Atul Gawande's "Complications," Devra Davis' "When Smoke Ran Like Water" and Elizabeth Gilbert's "The Last American Man."
NATIONAL
November 21, 2002 | From Reuters
Robert Caro on Wednesday won the National Book Award for "Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson," his third book on the life of the late president. Caro, who is working on a fourth and his intended last book on Johnson, said in a statement read at the National Book Foundation award ceremony here that people often ask if he gets bored spending so much time on one person. "I consider each of my four books studies on political power, how it is acquired and how it is used," he said.
BOOKS
November 2, 2003
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction *--* *--* 1 Life of Pi by Yann Martel (Harvest Books: $14) A boy shares a lifeboat with a tiger on a harrowing trip. 2 Mystic River by Dennis Lehane (HarperTorch: $7.99) A girl's murder causes three friends to confront their pasts. 3 The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (Penguin: $14) A teenage girl is haunted by her mother's death. 4 Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (Picador: $15) A Greek family embraces the American dream.
BOOKS
February 1, 2004
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction *--* *--* 1 Angels & Demons by Dan Brown (Pocket Books: $7.99) A Harvard scholar uncovers a vendetta against the Catholic Church. 2 Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (Picador: $15) A Greek family embraces the American dream. 3 Life of Pi by Yann Martel (Harvest Books: $14) A boy shares a lifeboat with a tiger on a harrowing trip. 4 The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (Penguin: $14) A teenage girl is haunted by her mother's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | Claudia La Rocco, Associated Press
Julia Glass arrives at a Greenwich Village cafe in a whirl of colors: turquoise scarf, shimmering purple peasant blouse, jade green glasses. It is a fitting outfit for the former painter and author of the visually lush "Three Junes," the winner of the 2002 National Book Award.
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