Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulia Margaret Cameron
IN THE NEWS

Julia Margaret Cameron

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Julia Margaret Cameron didn't pick up a camera until she had lived almost half a century and given birth to six children, but she made up for lost time. She created more than 3,000 photographs in about 15 years--from 1864 to her death in 1879--and is widely regarded as one of the most original and accomplished photographers of the 19th century.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
How fitting that the highly theatrical practice of photographer Julia Margaret Cameron should itself make its way into a piece of theater. The short play, "Freshwater," named after the Isle of Wight home where Cameron did most of her work, was written in 1923 by Virginia Woolf, Cameron's great-niece. Woolf never knew Cameron directly, because she was born a few years after the photographer's death in 1879, but she did her homework. The piece is both knowing and affectionate.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1996 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Julia Margaret Cameron was a privileged woman of Victorian England. Her social position gave her access to the academic, artistic and literary elite of the day. She bucked convention by becoming a pioneer professional photographer in the 1860s. Presently her work is surveyed in unusual depth by simultaneous exhibitions at the Getty Museum and Scripps College's Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
After a year of seeing Nicole Kidman's prosthetically altered face staring out from magazine pages and billboards, confronting an actual photo of Virginia Woolf is a bit of a shock. Three years before Woolf's suicide, Gisele Freund took a portrait of the writer and it is included in "Women Seeing Women" a collection of photographs published in May by W.W. Norton. Even giving due credit to hindsight, it is almost breathtaking how this woman's face betrays her fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
The work of English photographer Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) will launch Los Angeles' fall season in three locations: the J. Paul Getty Museum, Loyola Marymount University's Laband Gallery and the Grunwald Gallery at UCLA. "Whisper of the Muse: Photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron," at the Getty Sept. 10 through Nov. 16, surveys her career with a selection from the 225 Cameron photographs that the museum has acquired since 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
After a year of seeing Nicole Kidman's prosthetically altered face staring out from magazine pages and billboards, confronting an actual photo of Virginia Woolf is a bit of a shock. Three years before Woolf's suicide, Gisele Freund took a portrait of the writer and it is included in "Women Seeing Women" a collection of photographs published in May by W.W. Norton. Even giving due credit to hindsight, it is almost breathtaking how this woman's face betrays her fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Not so long ago the news noted that Alf Landon had turned 99. That gentleman had the distinction of losing the 1936 presidential race to Franklin D. Roosevelt, but even had he done nothing, it's getting to be news when somebody is a century old. Age confers a certain patina on both people and objects. When it comes to objects, there are those who argue that age alone is enough to turn an ordinary work of craft into a work of art.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2003 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
How fitting that the highly theatrical practice of photographer Julia Margaret Cameron should itself make its way into a piece of theater. The short play, "Freshwater," named after the Isle of Wight home where Cameron did most of her work, was written in 1923 by Virginia Woolf, Cameron's great-niece. Woolf never knew Cameron directly, because she was born a few years after the photographer's death in 1879, but she did her homework. The piece is both knowing and affectionate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996
A rare Victorian family album by British photographer Julia Margaret Cameron will be on view at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego March 13-May 14. "For My Best Beloved Sister Mia: An Album of Photographs" offers visitors an intimate look at family life in 19th century England. The museum at Casa de Balboa, 1649 El Prado, Balboa Park, is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $3.50 for adults. Members and children under 12 with adults get in free. Information: (619) 239-5262.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art has added more than 3,500 photographs to its collection -- thanks, in large part, to financial support from LACMA trustee Wallis Annenberg and the Annenberg Foundation. The artworks were amassed by the late Marjorie and Leonard Vernon, pioneering Los Angeles collectors whose trove surveys the history of photography in the works of 700 artists, including leading 19th and 20th century figures. Hailed by the museum as its most important gift of photographs to date, the gift increases LACMA's holding from 8,500 to 12,000 images and fills many gaps.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1996 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Julia Margaret Cameron was a privileged woman of Victorian England. Her social position gave her access to the academic, artistic and literary elite of the day. She bucked convention by becoming a pioneer professional photographer in the 1860s. Presently her work is surveyed in unusual depth by simultaneous exhibitions at the Getty Museum and Scripps College's Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Julia Margaret Cameron didn't pick up a camera until she had lived almost half a century and given birth to six children, but she made up for lost time. She created more than 3,000 photographs in about 15 years--from 1864 to her death in 1879--and is widely regarded as one of the most original and accomplished photographers of the 19th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
Not so long ago the news noted that Alf Landon had turned 99. That gentleman had the distinction of losing the 1936 presidential race to Franklin D. Roosevelt, but even had he done nothing, it's getting to be news when somebody is a century old. Age confers a certain patina on both people and objects. When it comes to objects, there are those who argue that age alone is enough to turn an ordinary work of craft into a work of art.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
The work of English photographer Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) will launch Los Angeles' fall season in three locations: the J. Paul Getty Museum, Loyola Marymount University's Laband Gallery and the Grunwald Gallery at UCLA. "Whisper of the Muse: Photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron," at the Getty Sept. 10 through Nov. 16, surveys her career with a selection from the 225 Cameron photographs that the museum has acquired since 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1999
What's happening the next few weeks: * "The Cecil Family Collects: Four Centuries of Decorative Arts From the Burghley House" goes on display Sunday at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. The show features 120 objects from the Cecils' home in England, which has been in the family since 1577. The museum also has on display another private collection, "Eclectic Focus: Photographs From the Vernon Collection," through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Human Auras: In "Self-Portrait as David," one of the cyanotypes in John Dugdale's current show at Stephen Cohen Gallery, the artist stands nude in the pose of Michelangelo's famous sculpture.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|