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Julia Morgan

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NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Berkeley City Club isn’t just a civic organization in a quirky little castle designed by renowned architect Julia Morgan. For years it has run a hotel offering 35 modest rooms and suites upstair in the Bay Area city. Now, as the club turns 80, celebrates completion of a facelift and confronts an off-season lull, it is renting rooms for just $80 per night . The deal: As a nod to its history, the club is renting 31 standard rooms for $80 a night plus tax. Normally, rates are around $145 to $165.
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NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Back in the day, actress Marion Davies' luxurious beach house in Santa Monica had more than 100 rooms and an ornate swimming pool. Little of the original mansion still exists, but what's now known as the Annenberg Community Beach House still has plenty of oceanfront allure. The beach house will mark its fifth anniversary Saturday and Sunday with an open house that is to feature activities as varied as ballroom dancing and paddleboarding lessons. Guided tours with architects John Berley and Mia Lehrer are scheduled for 10 a.m. each day. The mansion was financed by Davies' lover, newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, and many grand Hollywood parties were held here, according to a history on the beach house website . Hearst engaged Julia Morgan to design it; Morgan also designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, Calif.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The American Institute of Architects has broken the gender barrier for its highest award, the gold medal. The 2014 medal is going to famed California architect Julia Morgan nearly 57 years after her death in 1957 and more than 100 years after the first gold medal was conferred. Morgan, whose most famous building is Hearst Castle at San Simeon on California's central coast, was “a pivotal figure in the history of American architecture and American women,” according to an article the AIA published on its website announcing the award -- the eighth gold medal awarded posthumously.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The American Institute of Architects has broken the gender barrier for its highest award, the gold medal. The 2014 medal is going to famed California architect Julia Morgan nearly 57 years after her death in 1957 and more than 100 years after the first gold medal was conferred. Morgan, whose most famous building is Hearst Castle at San Simeon on California's central coast, was “a pivotal figure in the history of American architecture and American women,” according to an article the AIA published on its website announcing the award -- the eighth gold medal awarded posthumously.
BOOKS
September 4, 1988 | Thomas Hines, Hines is professor of history and architecture at UCLA. He is the author of "Burnham of Chicago: Architect and Planner" (Oxford, 1974) and "Richard Neutra and the Search for Modern Architecture" (Oxford, 1982)
When architect Julia Morgan (1872-1957) was once asked by a Berkeley professor to design a home "just like" one she had done for another professor, she asked him if he was, in every way, exactly like his colleague. His inevitably negative reply led Morgan to design for him an equally excellent house, but one that reflected his own individual needs and choices. This incident epitomizes the architect's penchant for subordinating "style" to client, site, and program.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
You can draw a straight line, in terms of architectural history, from William Randolph Hearst'ssprawling estate in San Simeon to the corner of Broadway and 11th Street in downtown Los Angeles. It was at that downtown site in 1913 that Hearst commissioned architect Julia Morgan to design a headquarters for his Los Angeles Examiner newspaper, which he'd founded in 1903. Morgan produced one of the most remarkable designs of her prolific career, a 103,500-square-foot Mission Revival building draped with Italian and Moorish touches, including domes covered in yellow and blue tile.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sara Boutelle, an architectural historian and author who rediscovered the work of Julia Morgan, the architect who designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, and brought it to wide public notice, has died. Boutelle was 90 when she died Wednesday at a hospital in Santa Cruz. Born in Aberdeen, S.D., and educated at Mt. Holyoke College, the Sorbonne and Hamburg University, Boutelle taught architecture at the Brearley School in New York City from 1946 until her retirement in 1974.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2010 | By Corina Knoll
A lavish hilltop estate boasting 165 rooms, an ocean view and a palatial pool fit for a publishing magnate would end up her most famous work. But Hearst Castle was just one of hundreds of buildings designed by Julia Morgan, believed to be the first female architect to practice independently in the United States. And although she had a flair for opulence, Morgan dedicated much of her time to projects intended for working-class women. It was Morgan who conceived the three-story YWCA building with the red-tile roof and arched windows on Marengo Avenue in Pasadena.
BOOKS
October 9, 1988
Re Thomas Hines' review of "Julia Morgan: Architect" by Sara Holmes Boutelle (Book Review, Sept. 4): While I too am a Julia Morgan fan, and pleased to see a longer overdue appreciation of her work, our enthusiasm must not overshadow the truth. Hines credits Julia Morgan with the design of Hearst's "Wyntoon," but it was designed and built (and later destroyed by fire) by Bernard Maybeck in 1902-03. Julia Morgan was 25 at the time and just returning from her European schooling. ALAN LOUIS KISHBAUGH LOS ANGELES According to Boutelle, Morgan lived in the apartment below Maybeck's in Paris in 1898.
NEWS
December 26, 1987
I enjoyed (Sam Hall Kaplan's Nov. 21) column about Julia Morgan, and especially the part about our Julia Morgan-designed Pasadena YWCA building. Our building is one of our most important assets. Not only is it architecturally significant, but the fact that it was designed by a woman architect makes it also an asset in terms of what it has meant in the lives of people in the Pasadena area since the 1920s. I wish I had had the opportunity to talk with Kaplan personally and also share our frustrations with the building.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
If you ever wanted to spend the night at a Hearst property designed by Julia Morgan, here is your chance. Book a Tower Room at the Historical Hacienda, William Randolph Hearst's Rancho Milpitas - and you would swear Errol Flynn is staying next door. The added bonus is Mission San Antonio, a mile down the road. Have your ID, insurance and car registration handy because the hacienda is on Ft. Hunter Liggett property. Have a pizza at the bowling alley or enjoy a drink at historic Club Hacienda.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Susan Spano
The 100th birthday of the Asilomar Conference Center is being celebrated this year with a full slate of events, including lunch and lecture series, guided walks, chef-led cooking demonstrations and holiday guest packages. All are designed to welcome back folks to the historic meeting grounds designed by architect Julia Morgan in 1913 as a YWCA summer camp on the Central Coast between Pebble Beach and Pacific Grove. The old girl has great bones thanks to Morgan, the first female architect licensed in California and best known for designing Hearst Castle . She put her rustic, Western Arts and Crafts signature on 11 buildings at Asilomar (a National Historic Landmark)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2013 | Steve Lopez
The last edition of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner was published on Nov. 2, 1989, with the headline: "So long, Los Angeles. " But 23 years later, one employee has not yet said goodbye. Chuck Lutz hasn't even left the building. "They never told me not to come back to work, so I just kept coming back to work," said Lutz, who was exaggerating a little. When a colleague declined an offer to supervise the shutdown of the newspaper plant, Lutz - who joined the Her-Ex in 1973 as a truck driver - gladly stepped into the job. One task led to another, and the Hearst Corp., which published the newspaper and still owns the building, kept the reliable Lutz around to keep an eye on things and open the door for film crews that use the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
You can draw a straight line, in terms of architectural history, from William Randolph Hearst'ssprawling estate in San Simeon to the corner of Broadway and 11th Street in downtown Los Angeles. It was at that downtown site in 1913 that Hearst commissioned architect Julia Morgan to design a headquarters for his Los Angeles Examiner newspaper, which he'd founded in 1903. Morgan produced one of the most remarkable designs of her prolific career, a 103,500-square-foot Mission Revival building draped with Italian and Moorish touches, including domes covered in yellow and blue tile.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Berkeley City Club isn’t just a civic organization in a quirky little castle designed by renowned architect Julia Morgan. For years it has run a hotel offering 35 modest rooms and suites upstair in the Bay Area city. Now, as the club turns 80, celebrates completion of a facelift and confronts an off-season lull, it is renting rooms for just $80 per night . The deal: As a nod to its history, the club is renting 31 standard rooms for $80 a night plus tax. Normally, rates are around $145 to $165.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2010 | By Corina Knoll
A lavish hilltop estate boasting 165 rooms, an ocean view and a palatial pool fit for a publishing magnate would end up her most famous work. But Hearst Castle was just one of hundreds of buildings designed by Julia Morgan, believed to be the first female architect to practice independently in the United States. And although she had a flair for opulence, Morgan dedicated much of her time to projects intended for working-class women. It was Morgan who conceived the three-story YWCA building with the red-tile roof and arched windows on Marengo Avenue in Pasadena.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
If you ever wanted to spend the night at a Hearst property designed by Julia Morgan, here is your chance. Book a Tower Room at the Historical Hacienda, William Randolph Hearst's Rancho Milpitas - and you would swear Errol Flynn is staying next door. The added bonus is Mission San Antonio, a mile down the road. Have your ID, insurance and car registration handy because the hacienda is on Ft. Hunter Liggett property. Have a pizza at the bowling alley or enjoy a drink at historic Club Hacienda.
OPINION
January 26, 1992
In response to "Hearst Hassle: Demolition of Historic Herald Examiner Building Weighed," Jan. 10: A small but beautifully detailed relic sits on my porch; it is a sad reminder of a fateful decision made by the Community Redevelopment Agency some years ago. It is an even sadder reminder of urban blight brought about by a lack of corporate foresight. The Southern California Gas Co. insisted that it needed to demolish the First Methodist Church to make way for new corporate offices.
TRAVEL
July 6, 2003 | Vani Rangachar, Times Staff Writer
Usually I find solace in traveling. It's the going, not the place, and sometimes it doesn't much matter where I end up as long as I can escape my unquiet spirit and world. But at Asilomar, a conference center on the Monterey Peninsula, it's the place that matters. Asilomar was designed by maverick architect Julia Morgan in the early part of the last century. It has been owned by the state parks system since 1956 and is operated by Delaware North Cos.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sara Boutelle, an architectural historian and author who rediscovered the work of Julia Morgan, the architect who designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, and brought it to wide public notice, has died. Boutelle was 90 when she died Wednesday at a hospital in Santa Cruz. Born in Aberdeen, S.D., and educated at Mt. Holyoke College, the Sorbonne and Hamburg University, Boutelle taught architecture at the Brearley School in New York City from 1946 until her retirement in 1974.
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