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Julia Palau

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BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | MARK SAYLOR
After 25 years of selling movie rights to markets around the world, Julia Palau has quietly emerged as one of the most powerful women in the independent film business. Palau, majority owner and CEO of J&M Entertainment, the London-based company she co-founded in 1978, is in the rare ranks of those movie executives who personally have the authority to green-light a slate of movies. Yet she is little known in the United States.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | MARK SAYLOR
After 25 years of selling movie rights to markets around the world, Julia Palau has quietly emerged as one of the most powerful women in the independent film business. Palau, majority owner and CEO of J&M Entertainment, the London-based company she co-founded in 1978, is in the rare ranks of those movie executives who personally have the authority to green-light a slate of movies. Yet she is little known in the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
It would be wonderful to report that the British farce with Maggie Smith as a sweetly homicidal housekeeper and Rowan Atkinson as a bumbling vicar was the second coming of England's Ealing Studios, which produced the hilariously impolite murder comedies "The Ladykillers" and "Kind Hearts and Coronets." "Keeping Mum," however, is a specimen for the morgue.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In her first film released since winning an Oscar as serial killer Aileen Wuornos in "Monster," Charlize Theron has chosen a part that on the surface could not be more different from the seedy, desperate hard-scrabble Florida prostitute. In Australian filmmaker John Duigan's romantic historical epic "Head in the Clouds," Theron's Gilda Besse is the daughter of a super-rich French champagne magnate (Steven Berkoff) and a rich American socialite.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Line Cinema had planned to release "Theodore Rex," a film pairing Whoopi Goldberg with an animatronic dinosaur, last Friday--four days after her critically acclaimed turn hosting the Academy Awards. But the date came and went with no "Theodore Rex," which New Line says is now headed for TV or home video after an unsuccessful test-market theatrical run. The $33.5-million family comedy becomes one of the most expensive films in memory to virtually bypass the nation's cinemas.
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