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Julia Phillips

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NEWS
January 3, 2002 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Movie producer Julia Phillips, who made Hollywood history as the first woman to win a best picture Oscar--for "The Sting" in 1973--and who became the talk of the town almost 20 years later with her scandalous autobiography "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," died Tuesday at her West Hollywood home. She was 57. Family members said she had been diagnosed as having cancer in August.
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NEWS
January 3, 2002 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Movie producer Julia Phillips, who made Hollywood history as the first woman to win a best picture Oscar--for "The Sting" in 1973--and who became the talk of the town almost 20 years later with her scandalous autobiography "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," died Tuesday at her West Hollywood home. She was 57. Family members said she had been diagnosed as having cancer in August.
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NEWS
November 10, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I embark on this review with great trepidation, since it seems that anyone who talks to or about Julia Phillips becomes fodder for her next book. It is one of the many ironies that are the foundation of this wild, wobbly piece of performance art: To tinker a bit with Tennessee Williams, Phillips has always depended on the unkindness of strangers. And so-called friends. And one-time friends. And ex- or about to be ex-business partners. Her worst nightmares turn into her best-selling books.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I embark on this review with great trepidation, since it seems that anyone who talks to or about Julia Phillips becomes fodder for her next book. It is one of the many ironies that are the foundation of this wild, wobbly piece of performance art: To tinker a bit with Tennessee Williams, Phillips has always depended on the unkindness of strangers. And so-called friends. And one-time friends. And ex- or about to be ex-business partners. Her worst nightmares turn into her best-selling books.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992 | Ryan Murphy
Two years ago, former producer Julia Phillips set the town on its ear with her No. 1 bestseller "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," a scathing tale of her own rise and fall that pretty much reinvented the kiss-and-tell Hollywood tome. Not one to rest on her laurels, Phillips is working on a follow-up that has a few of the movie industry's most powerful women on pins and needles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood's hottest eateries are buzzing with gossip about producer Julia Phillips. But don't expect Phillips to show up at their tables. The title of her new share-a-joint-and-tell book, about the Hollywood fast track, probably says it all: "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again." Phillips claims she's already been banned from one insiders' restaurant, Morton's, and confesses that she's avoiding others so that her guests don't have to be seen with her.
BOOKS
March 17, 1991 | Jean Vallely, Vallely is a Los Angeles-based writer.
It's been said that there are three kinds of Hollywood stories: celebrity on the way up, celebrity on the way down, celebrity makes a comeback. The first time I met Julia Phillips she was on the way up. Very near the top, in fact. It was 1975. She and Steven Spielberg had come to New York to do some research for their next project, "Close Encounters." (I had interviewed Spielberg for a Time magazine cover on "Jaws" and he introduced us).
BUSINESS
January 17, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a comedy called "Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead" died at the box office last summer, so did the prospects for a small production company headed by Michael Phillips. Phillips--who has not had a hit since he produced "The Sting" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" in the 1970s--had counted on the film to shore up the shaky finances of Mercury Entertainment, founded in the red-hot financial climate of the mid-1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
Julia Phillips is no ordinary talk-show guest and she would be the first to agree. As the author of "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," the damning autobiographical tome about depraved Hollywood, Phillips wouldn't participate in just any old afternoon television gab-fest even though it might be timely to do so. Her book, a bestseller in hardcover, recently made a splashy debut in paperback--bowing in the No. 1 slot its first week and slipping only slightly since.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON
By now, everyone in Hollywood knows what happened to Julia Phillips, the Oscar-winning producer who crashed and burned on drugs only to resurrect herself with the biting kiss-and-tell book "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again." But what of her ex-husband, Michael Phillips, with whom she produced a string of hits in the 1970s--"The Sting" (also with Tony Bill), "Taxi Driver" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992 | Ryan Murphy
Two years ago, former producer Julia Phillips set the town on its ear with her No. 1 bestseller "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," a scathing tale of her own rise and fall that pretty much reinvented the kiss-and-tell Hollywood tome. Not one to rest on her laurels, Phillips is working on a follow-up that has a few of the movie industry's most powerful women on pins and needles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1992 | Jane Galbraith
Julia Phillips is no ordinary talk-show guest and she would be the first to agree. As the author of "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again," the damning autobiographical tome about depraved Hollywood, Phillips wouldn't participate in just any old afternoon television gab-fest even though it might be timely to do so. Her book, a bestseller in hardcover, recently made a splashy debut in paperback--bowing in the No. 1 slot its first week and slipping only slightly since.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a comedy called "Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead" died at the box office last summer, so did the prospects for a small production company headed by Michael Phillips. Phillips--who has not had a hit since he produced "The Sting" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" in the 1970s--had counted on the film to shore up the shaky finances of Mercury Entertainment, founded in the red-hot financial climate of the mid-1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON
By now, everyone in Hollywood knows what happened to Julia Phillips, the Oscar-winning producer who crashed and burned on drugs only to resurrect herself with the biting kiss-and-tell book "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again." But what of her ex-husband, Michael Phillips, with whom she produced a string of hits in the 1970s--"The Sting" (also with Tony Bill), "Taxi Driver" and "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"?
BOOKS
March 17, 1991 | Jean Vallely, Vallely is a Los Angeles-based writer.
It's been said that there are three kinds of Hollywood stories: celebrity on the way up, celebrity on the way down, celebrity makes a comeback. The first time I met Julia Phillips she was on the way up. Very near the top, in fact. It was 1975. She and Steven Spielberg had come to New York to do some research for their next project, "Close Encounters." (I had interviewed Spielberg for a Time magazine cover on "Jaws" and he introduced us).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood's hottest eateries are buzzing with gossip about producer Julia Phillips. But don't expect Phillips to show up at their tables. The title of her new share-a-joint-and-tell book, about the Hollywood fast track, probably says it all: "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again." Phillips claims she's already been banned from one insiders' restaurant, Morton's, and confesses that she's avoiding others so that her guests don't have to be seen with her.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Hot Paperback: When former producer Julia Phillips' Hollywood memoir came out last year, bookstores couldn't keep it on the shelves. The onetime Hollywood outcast is hot again: The just-out paperback edition of "You'll Never Eat Lunch in This Town Again" appears in the No. 1 spot on the March 15 New York Times paperback bestseller list.
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